Leaderboard


Popular Content

Showing most liked content since 12/21/2016 in all areas

  1. Blood, sweat, tears and a million dig holes! I, remember many of them. It's the hunt for them and the sweet sound in my headphones, that I cherish! Until the next hunt...when ever this rain ends? LuckyLundy
    23 likes
  2. I couldn’t find a wireless delay specification for the GPZ 7000 WM 12. So I tested it. The attached oscilloscope display is the audio waveform envelopes from a US nickel passing over the GPZ-19 coil at approximately 40 inches per/sec. The upper yellow waveform is from the earphone jack on the back of the GPZ 7000. The lower green waveform is from the earphone jack of the wireless WM 12 receiver. The waveforms are sweeping in time from the left side to the right side. The entire display is divided into 10 horizontal increments of 50 milliseconds (0.050 sec.) each. The audio (wah-wee sound) created by the nickel is spread across 9 divisions (450 milliseconds) with the nickel crossing the center of the coil at approximately 4.5 divisions (225 milliseconds). Close measurement of the green trace displacement to the right indicates that the wireless WM 12 receiver audio is delayed by 20 milliseconds. The nickel speed of 40 inches per second is equal to 1 second divided by 40 = 0.025 sec. = 25 milliseconds to move 1 inch. So a delay of 20 milliseconds is less than a 1 inch position error which would be imperceptible during normal searching. When slowed down to pinpointing speed it would be a minuscule error. A 50 ms delay would result in an approximate 2 inch position error which at sweep speed is probably not that noticeable to most of us. Again at pinpointing speed it should not be a problem. For information; the scattered positive and negative spikes are noise spikes from the GPZ 7000 transmitter pulses. The wide bandwidth / fidelity of the oscilloscope allow it to capture these spikes. The spikes are too high in frequency for the human ear to hear. Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) that we randomly hear resembles the waveform envelopes shown in this display. This is somewhat technical so I hope I have made it understandable to some. Have a good day, Chet
    21 likes
  3. I can't believe it, I got another morning to myself so went back out with the GPZ 19 coil and stuck to my "Boom or Bust" large nugget settings. 4 hours into it and just when I was starting to think I was going to go home gold-less I banged this 30 gram piece out in the open in among old dig holes. I've been over this dozens of times over the last 20 years with every coil imaginable, its one of my field testing locations so I am VERY familiar with the area. I know for sure I've been over it with the GPZ 14" too. Anyway here's the pics, and Norvic if your son has pipped me at the post yet again start your own bloomin thread!! JP
    21 likes
  4. Picked up an SCD2300 for my son from a fellow member of this forum right before Christmas. Thanks Allen! Finally made it out for just a few hours today with my 9 year old son. Third target, a nice little picker! First 2 targets were the tiniest shot I have ever found with a detector. I am amazed at the response from the SDC on such a tiny target. We were working around a small bedrock outcropping and I was teaching him what to listen for and how to retrieve a target. After the first two targets were lead shot within about 12 inches of each other, the third target had to be shot also (within the same area). I wanted to move on and he said no way let's dig it. About an inch into the decomposing bedrock the target had moved. He grabbed a handful of dirt and had the target in his hand. The target was small and he was having a little trouble figuring out how to split the dirt between his hand and the scoop, but when he finally had a few small bits of dirt in the scoop I could see a glint of yellow. Once he realized it was gold he kept saying I told you we should dig that target! Dad you wanted to walk away! I will probably never hear the end of it. Well, he was right! We spent about 3 hours out in the Motherload on an absolutely beautiful afternoon. Temps on my truck showed 60 degrees. We moved to another spot that I found several nuggets at a few years ago to give the sdc a go to finish the day. Steve H. you, Chris R., and Steve W., and Mike G. were there the day I found the nuggets at this spot. First target was the tiniest piece of gold I have ever found with a metal detector. It does not even register on the scale. I didn't take a picture of the tiny piece cause it probably would not even show up in a picture it was so tiny. I am amazed that any detector could find a piece of gold so small. I doubt it will even register on my gmt. We had a great day and my son should be able to really use this detector on his own next time out. He took to it like...on... Funny thing he found some old rusty sardine cans and a broken old flashlight to take for show-and-tell at school tomorrow along with his piece of gold. Looking forward to getting out again!
    20 likes
  5. Found this nice 26 gram slug with my GPZ 7000 and GPZ 19 coil yesterday (Christmas Eve). I grabbed my phone and filmed some of it so will get to work over coming days and piece the footage together if it's not too shaky, so keep an eye out for a link on this thread depending on where I end up getting it hosted. There were some key points about this dig which ties in with all the advice I've given since the coils release, hopefully that will come through on video because it was a real eye opener. I will say this though, I specifically went out chasing this type of target so hopefully some of the Aussie baggers of the GPZ 19 coil will be reading this post, the GPZ 14 coil would not touch this target except for General Normal and that was only because I knew the nugget was there, localised ground conditions would not allow the use of Normal at this location. JP
    19 likes
  6. Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays everyone. Heres a few photos of some of my new friends. Nothing compared to those Aussie nuggets but some gold at least. All park finds and a few relics. I only was able to get out nugget hunting once this year but hope to get out more in 2017. The 7000 is getting rusty.....Thanks for a great resource Steve! strick
    19 likes
  7. I am doing up a more detailed coverage of this for the ICMJ, but I want to post at least a little on this here: I've gotten several contacts in the last month from folks who have bought claims through ebay or by other means over the internet. These are people who don't know much of anything about mining or claims or anything else. They make old weird beard on Gold Rush look like a know-it-all mining genius. They ask me for help in recovering the millions and millions of $$$$$$$$ they just know are on their claim. I've also been contacted by folks who have filed legitimate claims and had encounters with these folks who stake over their valid claims to sell them to the inexperienced. Now don't get me wrong, it is totally legitimate to stake and then sell a mining claim. it's totally legal to stake a claim with the idea that you might sell or lease the claim to another person. No problem there. The problem is mis-leading your buyers with things that just really are not true. Leading your buyer to believe there is valuable ore on the claim when you have no sample data to show that is simply fraud. What they sell is more like a dream than a business - the buyer thinks something like: ooooh! Owning my own mining claim sounds so dreamy.... Those of us who have been doing this for a while are less dreamy eyed and more practical about it. I know most of the guys who regularly post have a reasonable level of experience. I post this to the new guys and those who lurk here to learn. Here are my iron clad rules about buying mining claims that you should always follow: 1. Take everything the seller says with a giant grain of salt - they want to make a sale and will tell you what you want to hear. Let the buyer beware! 2. Never buy a claim until you have the skills to go out and sample the claim and evaluate it for yourself. Until you have those skills, you have no business trying to buy a claim. 3. Never consider buying a claim until you have the knowledge needed to go out and stake your own claim independently and maintain it with the government in good standing. You will need this information to determine if the claim you are buying is valid or not. 4. Never, never buy a claim without first inspecting it on site and in person, and performing a full property evaluation for yourself as noted in No. 2 above. Buying a claim is a business decision and should be made like a business decision, not made as a daydream to seek and hope for something good.
    17 likes
  8. Hello, Ive been away working 2 jobs 16 hours a day for last 3 1/2 months. With only a couple days off a month. And it has been some hard times for my personal live losing my best friend, another good friend and my Aunt. but forward I shall keep going. Anyway on my very few days off I went detecting with Nokta Fors plus, makro Gold Racer & makro Racer 2 to find some bits of gold. They are all great gold detectors and I will get back out again soon for more. hope everybodys new years is starting off great. Good luck!
    17 likes
  9. Thought I would share my first hunt for the alluvious , with a break in the weather, I headed out early Sunday to an old patch , confidence high for the new year. Was looking for to trying out some different settings ( JP's advice ?) . Well I had found some bits there before but after about a ten hour session had been SKUNKED ?. JP's settings had worked though I managed to find a pocket full of old shot gun pellets. Set up camp , as I pondered on the day's events under a awesome bright three quarter moon, couldn't help thinking need a change of plan . The next morning up early coffee and of to another patch, well I was confident as still had settings close to those advised by Master JP ?Ten minutes and then I got my first mellow signal a nugget I thought, was excited ? Scraped about 2" off and checked target moved , after sorting out found a JW special .12 of gram ? First gold of 17 yeah . Had a break, back to it , about 20mins later had a faint repeatable signal , was fairly broad, might be GN , I took a scrape and signal improved , then started to dig , down 1foot still in the hole ?Sweet I was on to something ? 10mins later and a large hole approx between 1.5 to 2feet deep signal was out,so was I of breath and hot as ! Was a nice 14.8gramer?. I then got my breath back and backfilled the huge hole ? Continued to proceed toward some more open ground about 300 meters away where a mate had found a couple of peaces . Blow me down was there for 3 minutes and was on a target, different signal mellow but broken , like wire . Turned out to be a little specie .By this time I was out of water in me camel back and it was starting to hot and clouds building , making detectin a bit difficult due to noise. Called it a day and made tracks for home , happy for the first outing of the year ?. I would just like thanks to all that have been posting settings and GB control as has been interesting to read and apply. To those who doubt it makes much difference, the only thing I regret was not having a camera to take a picture of the depth of the hole in hot ground where I got the 14.8 grammar ,with just about JP's settings ?Thanks mate! Best luck to all for coming year, Squizz
    17 likes
  10. I've been out a few times now with the 19" and finally got over a couple of keepers! Yesterday I was hunting in a known meteorite area in Gold Basin, Arizona. Meteorites in this area are primarily surface targets to maybe 1 or 2 inches. You can still hunt in some areas for them without a detector. I started out with the 14" coil and found the 25g meteorite on the right. Now that I had located an area still holding them (and showing dig holes) I wanted to try the 19" coil. I didn't have to walk very far away before I got the 18g meteorite on the left. My first keeper of any kind with the 19" coil. Today we went a few miles away from where we found the meteorite and got the little .45g nugget that was 'missed' in a patch where I found several with the 14" coil. It was about 4" down. When I saw it and gave it a 'Find Point' I thought it was .2g. The sound was very faint but when I got to pinpointing it screamed. I was using JP's conservative settings. Before we went to Gold Basin we were in Quartzsite where I have very little experience with big gold at any depth. Actually I have very little experience anywhere with big deep gold so I'm trying to remember stories I have heard from others and go to those locations but I'll have to research more. It's just good to break in the coil. Mitchel
    16 likes
  11. Hi lutfi. In mild soils you get the ability to use the GPZ in Normal gold modes which means tapping into the full depth potential of ZVT. In Normal operators will notice more sensitivity to the Ferrite ring In Normal there will be more ground noise In Normal the Ferrite balance is a lot more important especially if the soils have varying degrees of X signal (Ferrite like material) In Normal the Ground balance will move around a lot more, so an operator needs to be aware that rapidly lifting or tilting the coil or poor coil control can cause the GB to drift out of optimum, so they need to maintain the GB more by checking its accuracy more often (pump the coil without the Quick-Trak button to bring the GB back into line with the local ground conditions) Settings for Normal using GPZ 19, GPZ 14 with a B&Z booster and dual speakers: I use very similar settings across the board on the GPZ, so long as the Audio Smoothing is OFF so I can tap into the full low noise floor potential of the GPZ 7000. Sensitivity 7 to 9 (usually 9) Audio Smoothing OFF Volume 8 or even less if the ground is variable Volume Limit 8 to 10 or even less than 8 in variable soils Threshold 27 Ground Balance Auto Tone 60 GPS OFF (important little snippet that one which requires a thread all on its own) Ferrite Balance notes: I always use the Ferrite ring and I check the Ferrite balance often. Initially at start up and then again 30 minutes later and often after that just to be sure. You need to calibrate to the Ferrite for each Gold Mode and Ground Type Mode you are using, the Ferrite balance will move around more in Normal Modes so I check it often. If there is no X signal in the soils you are working then you won't hear the X signal if the X balance is out, however in my experience all gold bearing soils have X signal so it pays to keep a good X balance regardless of the soils being worked. If there is X signal present and the Ferrite Balance is out then the X signal can mask target signals without your even being aware, plus if the X balance is out it does have an effect on the G balance behavior because the two are symbiotic. G balance is the regular ground balance of PI machines, X is the Ferrite balance, due to ZVT the GPZ is susceptible to X so the ground balance software has to combine the two, they interact with each other. Difficult and Normal: Difficult removes ground signal but also the null points of the modes (High Yield, General and Xtra Deep) are different to each other across the Ground Type modes (Difficult compared to Normal). For instance a 1/2 ounce solid nugget will give a better response in General Difficult than in General Normal, this is not due to ground signal but more to do with the modes sensitivity points. Some nuggets will fall into a modes least sensitive position that's why it pays to go over ground with a variety of modes. In Australia we often only have the choice of using Difficult due to the severity of the mineralisation, the concentration of iron rich highly magnetic surface materials just kills the performance of Normal, or rather the signals created by those near to coil minerals swamp out or mask the deeper responses, hence why I always advise lifting the coil for maximum depth. You need to get the coil out of the near to coil surface mineral responses to allow the deeper target signals to come through, obviously this potentially removes a lot of the small shallow target response so a blend of the two dependent on ground is required. My aim is to always give the deeper target signals as much chance as possible to be heard, lifting the coil prevents the near to soil response from drowning out the deep target signals. Hope this helps JP
    15 likes
  12. I would add to the above that if you lack the mentioned expertise - hire a qualified person that does. Best insurance money you will ever spend! There are companies that will file all the appropriate paperwork each year, etc. I filed my own paperwork for decades and still managed to screw it up finally so even people that think they know how can get caught. Arizona has a page on mining scams at http://www.azgs.az.gov/mining_scams.shtml More from http://dnr.alaska.gov/mlw/factsht/mine_fs/investig.pdf (on Alaska mining claims but similar issues apply elsewhere): ASK THE SELLER: 1. Is the claim State or Federal? What is the claim name and number? If it is a state claim ask for the ADL (Alaska Division of Lands) number. This is the identifying number for state records regarding the claim, and will help you research claim history, status, staking and maintenance. 2. Who is the owner of record? Claims can have more than one owner. In such cases, remember if only the interest of one owner is being transferred, you will be a partner with other owners of record. 3. Ask for a recorded copy of the claim location certificate. A recorded copy of the claim location certificate will have on it the Recording District Office stamp, date of recording, and document number or book and page number. 4. Whether Annual Labor or assessment work has been accomplished on a continuing basis; was acceptable; and has been properly recorded and filed according to State or Federal regulations. (NOTE: Again, regulations vary considerably here! Detailed information can be obtained by contacting the appropriate information source for State and Federal claims.) ***Be careful of claims offered for sale after September 1. This is the end of the annual labor year on both State and Federal claims. Assessment work must have been accomplished for any specific year prior to that date and recorded no later than November 30th for the State claims and December 30th for Federal claims. Have the seller show you a properly recorded affidavit. 5. Whether the claim is in conflict with other mineral locations. Claim conflicts do occur and often end up in court when the parties involved cannot resolve the problem themselves. You should verify the answers to the above questions through your own research or by engaging a professional agent to help guide you through the claim purchase. Other factors can enter into claim validity – factors that are often challenged in a court of law, especially if claim conflicts exist. These may include: 1. Whether the claim was located following the guidelines of appropriate State or Federal regulations, including: • Whether a “discovery” of a locatable mineral actually took place. The seller should be able to prove what type of discovery took place, i.e. geochemical sampling, panning, or drilling. If a visit to the location is possible, obtain permission to do your own sampling. • Whether the claim was actually staked in the field. Were posts or monuments erected and notice posted according to law? Or, was the claim “paper-staked”? • Whether the claim was properly recorded within 45 days of the date of staking in the District Recorder’s Office where it was located. 2. Whether annual labor has been done and properly recorded. Errors in the “essential facts” required on the annual labor affidavit are grounds for abandonment of the claim. 3. Whether annual rental has been paid in a timely manner. On State mining claims the rental year begins at noon on September 1 and ends at noon on September 1 of the following year. Payments must be received no later than November 30 of the same year. The penalty for failure to make a timely payment is abandonment of the location. See the Annual Rental Fact Sheet available on the Mining Section web page or at the Public Information Centers in Anchorage or Fairbanks. • NOTE: A word of caution, if the staking date of a mining claim on State land is prior to September 1 of a particular year, two annual rental payments will be required during that first year. The first is due no later than 45 days after the staking date of the location, and the second, no later than November 30. As a buyer, there are other important concerns you should be aware of or have clarified before taking the big plunge of investing: 1. Is the seller legitimate and reputable? What is their mining, prospecting, or geological background? How can it be verified? 2. Have any valuable minerals ever been produced or found on the land? Historical and geological reports on most areas in the State are available through the State Division of Geological and Geophysical Survey or the U.S. Geological Survey. The USGS maintains the Alaska Resource Data Files (ARDF) at http://ardf.wr.usgs.gov/. The ARDF files contain descriptions of many of the mineral occurrences in Alaska, and are a good quick reference. 3. Can the seller produce proof that he has operated on the claim? Depending on the type of equipment used, permits are normally required before any type of mining operation can begin. Operators who have submitted Applications for Permits to Mine in Alaska (APMAs) for intended mining activity involving mechanized equipment can be confirmed through a State Division of Mining, Land and Water Permitting Office. 4. Be aware of what rights you have with a mining claim! A common misconception is that the buyer is actually buying the land. This is not true, unless the mining property has been patented under Federal law and the owner has title to the land. (Patents are not issued under State mining laws.) Without a patent, the seller is only transferring their interest in the mineral rights to you. Ownership of the land remains with the State, Federal, or local government. As a claim owner, you have the right to possession and extraction of the minerals; but: a. You may not use a mining claim for purposes other than mining. Incompatible uses include residential use, placing any surface improvement on the claim without written approval; and use of the claim to pursue recreational or business interests such as hunting, fishing, trapping, guiding, or outfitting. b. You may not restrict public access without written approval from the land manager. c. If a third party has interest in the surface estate of a state mining claim, such as a grazing lease or surface ownership by a borough, you are required to reimburse the lessee or surface owner for damages caused by your use of the location for mining. 5. Is the claim compatible with the type of mining you intend to do? For example, if you intend to conduct suction dredging activities and the claim is located on a salmon spawning stream, be aware of the time frame restrictions as to when dredging can take place – generally from May 15 to July 15 annually. Note that on federal lands (federal mining claims), suction dredging is authorized at the discretion of the Authorized Officer. 6. Access – Are you familiar with the claim’s general location? Is there reasonably accessible? If travel “cross country” is involved, check land status along the route. Native corporation land, parks, refuges, stream crossings, area plans, type of equipment, time frame for intended travel, restrictive right-of-ways, etc., are potential problem areas. Charter flights to a “fly-in” only area can be expensive. 7. Water Rights – Are existing water rights associated with the claim? Water rights are registered with the State of Alaska and a certificate issued by the State’s Department of Natural Resources, Division of Mining, and Land & Water. Will they be transferred as part of the purchase? What is the availability of water in that particular stream during the course of a mining season? 8. What permitting requirements are there for mining activities, including transportation of equipment; exploration; or actual mining, in Alaska? It’s important to know any such activity must be fully permitted before “start-up” can begin. 9. Can mining even be conducted on your claim? In recent years, lawsuits against the State and Federal governments have restricted or stopped mining activity altogether in certain areas.
    14 likes
  13. Hi Guys & Gals, Merry xmas to you all. Mrs JW's daughter & partner are down for a few days over xmas & we headed out to a secluded river beach for a xmas picnic lunch today. It was a stunning day. This view from our drive out to our spot. The crew The spot A few days earlier our plan was to take the "kids" on a bit of a ticky tour of the sites around Central Otago & then do a bit of detecting. More to the point MR's JW was going to take them on a ticky tour while I detected & they were going to call in later & do a bit of detecting after seeing the sites. We ended up doing quite a bit of driving off the beaten track before they dropped me off to detect. We came across these display pieces on our travels. Old dredge buckets & an old sluicing monitor. By then Mr's JW said to her daughters partner, Would you like to stretch your legs for a bit, maybe do an hours detecting then I will show you around. Yep he was keen for that. So I had taken the 4500 for him to use & I was going to do a few tests with that & a few other coils I had brought along to do try on those two bigger bits of gold I had got last weekend at this spot with the zed. As I was sure the 4500 should have pinged those two. My plan was to do that with the 4500 while they were away & when they came back I would use the zed & he the 4500. Anyway, I got him rigged up with the 4500 & the 11" Elite coil. The question he asked me was , Where havent you been......Over that side of the gully & around there. I said. OK....so he was off. I went back over the same ground & a bit further from where I got my finds last weekend. I snagged 3 more little bits. I then heard him call out & saw him waving his hand with fingers pointing up, signaling he had found a bit. Sweet as, I called out & gave him the thumbs up & then carried on with what I was doing. After a while I looked over to where he was & saw he hadnt moved very far but was doing a lot of digging & the detector nutting off. MMMmmm....has the bugger found a wee patch. Mr's JW came over to me to confirm that he had & that he was now going no where. So there went my plans to do the tests with the 4500. To cut a long story short he found 23 pieces for just over 9 grams. So that was the day. The next day they had the day planned doing other stuff so I headed in to the hills on my own for the day detecting. This was xmas eve day. Well damned if I didnt stumble on to a little patch of my own. After a couple of hours I had this. Before I stopped for a coffee break. To cut a long story short & save heaps of pics I came across a couple of little glory holes. The last one coughed up about 20 pieces & is still giving signals. I am going to have to go back & widen the hole. Down about two feet & in to that schist basement rock A few pics of the gold coming out of it. Just small. Smallest was .04 of a gram I did get a bigger bit on the opposite side of the gully. 1.7 grams I fitted the swing arm a couple of weekends ago but found it a bit of a pain when trying to pinpoint a signal when not using the swing arm & having it wave around getting in the way. Not sure if others of you find that annoying as the little clip thing is ok when just carrying your detector or not using the swing arm but it isnt very user friendly to quickly get the swing arm out of the way when really laying in to a dig when you have unclipped the bungy from the harness like when pinpointing or just swinging the detector one handed with out using the swing arm to check the signal. I then had a light bulb moment. What I did was to quickly wrap the bungy cord one lap around the swing arm & detector shaft & hook the bungy back on to itself to hold the swing arm at bay. Worked a treat. Simple to just unclip it & hook the bungy back on to the harness when carrying on detecting with the swing arm. So all up 47 bits for just shy of 10 grams. YE HA. The Zed strikes again. Cheers guys Good luck out there for 2017 JW kiwijw
    14 likes
  14. Well, I would love to say that it was me who was the first to score gold with my new coil.... But alas..... Klunker bloodied it with with 3 nuggets totaling about 5dwt. They were roughly 14" deep...or 355.56mm for you Aussie friends He had no problem using the coil without a bungee or hipstick.....but I haven't figured out how he does that! Good job Klunker!
    14 likes
  15. Hi guys, A few days ago I went back to the spot where I had got 6 little bits of gold for .88 of a gram on my 2nd to last days detecting of 2016. It was an area I hadnt been to prior for about 18 months as I was no longer getting gold from it until I hit it with the Zed. So roll on 2017 & my first days detect. I got there & rigged up. It took about half an hour before I got my first very faint signal. It was down a bit into the solid schist that I had to smash out to get down in to the folds of the turned up on edge schist. Such a great gold trap. Gold it was Moved on & another very faint signal Again down in to the folds of the schist & in to a crevice Small bit of gold Then in to another schist crevice A tiny piece .04 of a gram Before I back filled the dig I scanned the hole, as I always do, & another signal. This time at the back of the hole Another small bit of gold Another faint signal. This time it was just in the gravel wash Slightly bigger. But not by much Then a signal right on top of bare schist bed rock. Must be down in it a bit. Bloody hell......here we go again. Smashing in to the hard schist. Not breaking apart as easily as the others & not opening up in to a crevice. Oh my poor pick. Took a while to get it out & luckily it wasnt too deep .03 of a gram Down in to the bed rock schist again Wee bit bigger. Almost a half grammer. .04 I stopped for a coffee & a bite to eat & took a pic of the total so far It was damn hot & I felt like packing it in but I had my coffee & wondered on down to another area of exposed bed rock. Got a slight hint of a break in the threshold. Backed up & scraped in to the up on edge schist. This one was getting down deep & giving me a hard time at getting it out Broke out the tweezers & coffee spoon to get in to that tight crevice that my pick point just couldnt get in to. Too worn down. Note in the foreground the up on edge fingers of schist bed rock. Mighty fine gold traps those. Finally got it out That was it. I was buggered after that one. So all up of absolutely flogged ground that even the GB2 & GMT weren't scoring any thing. I got another 8 bits of gold for 1.72 grams So off to a positive start with the Zed for 2017. YE HA Cheers all & best of luck out there for 2017 JW
    13 likes
  16. Got out today to the Pahrump / Johnnie NV area today. Still new to the GPZ , since selling the GPX 5000 not to long ago. But learning from everyone here sharing their experiences and settings on the GPZ got me on top of a little gold today. I have to say, Im pretty impressed with this machine. Its got me on some good gold and meteorites in the short time Ive had it. Dave
    13 likes
  17. Just looking through some old pics and came across this one from a few years back... Some gold found by a couple friends that mine near Fairbanks, Alaska. Don't recall the total, maybe 10-15 ounces in the pic. A little motivation for everyone...
    13 likes
  18. There are two types of Gain or Sensitivity settings. One type boosts the actual transmit (TX) power of the detector. The other type boosts or amplifies the receive (RX) signal. The GPZ 7000 Sensitivity setting is the second type. That being the case increasing the sensitivity is not actually making the machine more powerful. You amplify signals from nuggets, but also from ground noise and electrical interference (EMI). Ground setting controls directly affect the signals being generated. One ground setting may cause certain hot rocks to create signals. Another ground setting may eliminate those same hot rocks. Increasing the sensitivity in the first instance will make those hot rock signals and gold nugget signals louder. In the second instance, there is no hot rock signal that can be increased, so increasing the sensitivity control will not make those hot rock signals louder but will boost the response on a gold nugget. The Gold Mode and Ground Type are primary controls as they determine what the detector will or will not detect. The Sensitivity or Gain is a secondary control that amplifies the signals generated. The audio settings, Volume, Threshold Level, Threshold Pitch, Volume Limit, and Audio Smoothing all also act in their various ways to change how you hear the signal after the fact. They are less about changing the generated signal and more about customizing the sounds for your particular hearing. People still play one against the other however, lowering one while increasing another. The main problem when you dig into the details is that THERE ARE NO MAGIC SETTINGS. Different ground types, hot rocks, gold types, and background EMI call for different primary settings. Then our own hearing and brain signal processing call for different secondary control settings. Primary controls like ground type are actually simpler in my opinion. If you have a certain pesky hot rock, and one ground setting really lights it up, and another eliminates it, it is obvious with a bit of experimentation which setting is best. After that however things get messy. What we all want really is a detector that is dead quiet, and then gives a loud, unmistakable beep on a gold nugget, and nothing else. People often strive to reach this ideal level of perfection. The problem is that we all discover that a perfectly quiet detector gives up certain signals, typically the weakest signals. The Threshold control is an easy example. Many people do not like listening to a detector that makes a constant noise. Just turn the threshold down until the machine is like a coin detector - quiet until it goes beep. Most nugget hunters however live and die by the threshold and feel lost without it. It is those faint threshold disturbances that signal a very small or very deep nugget. Games then develop. Lower the Threshold but increase the Sensitivity is an example. It is like putting your foot on the brake while increasing the pressure on the gas pedal, with the great benefit being you can't burn up the brakes. You can still have your silent machine while boosting some signals that may have been lost, but finding the magic combination depends on what signals the primary controls are creating for you to modify in the first place, and that depends exactly where you are detecting. After years of going over this with hundreds of detectors and thousands of people I have come to understand it really is more about our ears and brains. We all have different combinations. We all have different ears, that is fairly easy to understand, and so the threshold setting you find too loud I may find too quiet. It normally just needs to be set as low as possible while still being audible, but that setting may vary due to our hearing. The second part is more to do with our brain. If you hate hearing a noise all day, you may want to set the threshold to just below where it is audible. I may want to set it where it is just barely audible. That may have a bit too much waver in the sound for some people as the ground varies, so they will raise the threshold even more in an attempt to smooth the signal. Which is correct? An engineer can tell you from a technical standpoint, but they would be wrong in my opinion. The trick to prospecting is in the end more mental than almost anything else. For most casual hunters it has to be enjoyable. If it is not, it is a burden to be borne, and we all can only bear a burden for so long. In my opinion the detector has to match your personal style in the way that makes you most comfortable and most likely to persevere and continue detecting. My brain and my style demands constant audio feedback. In theory I want a machine to be perfectly quiet and only make a sound over gold. Forty years of detecting has taught me it does not work that way for me. I like to have the machine deliver constant audio feedback, and so at a minimum I need to have a constant threshold tone. I like to hear faint ground variations as I go. Each detector has its own language, and apparently I have a brain that from long years of detecting has been trained well in these languages. People hear noise, I hear the symphony. It does not matter that much that I have poor hearing - I fix that with the controls and headphones, etc. What matter most to me is getting all the audio into my ears and to my brain, where the real work occurs. EMI makes one noise, ground makes another, rocks make something else, but with time it is the nugget signal that stops me dead in my tracks. Many people when coin detecting just want the machine to beep. Others want a couple tones. Most will balk at more than four tones. I prefer what is called full tones, which on my DFX means 191 different tones. I also do not like rejecting targets, but prefer for them to just have their own tone. It is all music to my ear, and I literally experience all attempts to reduce raw signals as a deadening of information to my brain. Critical information is being withheld and I am not happy. Too put it simply, if my machine is dead quiet, I feel deaf. That is a long explanation of how I detect. I am at one extreme. Another person will be at the other far end, trying hard to make their machine dead quiet unless over a nugget or a coin. In between we have the vast majority of people. seeking their own perfect combination that works for them. None is actually right or wrong - it is what works best for them. I am the renegade on this one because detectorists with more of an engineering bent will insist that no, running too noisy is bad, or running too quiet is bad. From an engineers perspective there is indeed a perfect signal to noise ratio for any given circumstance that is correct, and anything else is incorrect. The problem as I have found it is trying to impose one style of detecting on a person with a different style is hammering a square peg into a round hole. What matters in my opinion is to put very many hours on your detector while learning what every control does by way of experimentation. Then use that knowledge to develop settings that work best for your own situations and detecting style. Reading stuff like this is a very good start but at the end of the day it is like learning to play the guitar by reading about it. To learn and get good with a guitar requires constant practice and a detector is no different. I almost never discuss specific settings, but did so by publishing my Steve's Insanely Hot GPZ 7000 Settings. I kind of regret doing so now. The problem is people latch onto this stuff like it is some kind of gospel. Then you get Lunk's ZED Settings and the debate begins, which is "right" and which is "wrong". The answer is Lunk's settings are right for him, and my settings are right for me, and both of us would change them in a heartbeat if we thought it would be beneficial. More importantly, neither of us would ever advocate just using some settings gleaned off the internet as anything more than a starting point for your own experimentation, to find what works best for you in given locations depending on your own detecting style and preferences. Using some setting off the internet is like buying a car and then getting on the internet and asking which gear setting and throttle setting combination is best. It all depends on the road and the driver. The key thought I want to leave you with is that you just need to be in the ballpark. Detectors are actually pretty forgiving. The most important thing is to work on getting into good locations and practicing good prospecting habits like good coil control and long hours of detecting. Things like that have more impact on the gold you will find then the chase to find the perfect setting. Most nuggets I find to this day I would have found with a wide range of settings and indeed with many different detectors. You have to get the coil over the nugget, first and foremost. Well, way more answer than a simple question asked for, and maybe I just confused the issue. That's what happens when you give me a cup of coffee and put me in front of a keyboard in the morning! Below it says "using the highest stable sensitivity setting will achieve the best performance" (emphasis added). Or go back to Fred's answer above if I have thoroughly confused the issue.
    12 likes
  19. Some random photos..... Wildlife sightings were rare on this trip, but I did look up one day and see an emu watching me. Second only to the ostrich is size, these birds can reach six feet in height and do up to 30 mph in a sprint. This tree looked like an oversize banzai to me. I always got excited running into large amounts of quartz but it always seemed to be barren. Spring was in full bloom in the desert. This expanse of quartz did not produce any gold, but see that little arch in the distance? Here is the arch closer up. It is actually small, just enough room to crawl through. Yellow flowers everywhere. JP finds a small lizard. Escarpment in the distance. This quartz reef went as far as I could see. Flowering bush. Scattered quartz and iron rocks always got me going. Good stuff. More flowers. Cool banded rock. Some places look like planned gardens.
    12 likes
  20. Hi guys, Mrs JW & I had spent most of Thursday doing some landscaping out the front of our place. We went down to the Shotover River & got some big slabs of schist for some path way stepping stones & did some tussock grass plantings. We had finished by about 3pm. Mrs JW said, "Do you want to go to ........ & do some detecting?" I hadnt been there for about 18 months due to not being able to get any more gold out of there so I sort of umed & arred....not sounding too keen on it. I was a bit knacked from wrestling with the slabs of schist & digging them in to place. "You havnt tried the Zed there have you?" No I havnt I said.....still not too keen. "I just want to get out of here & it is a nice place to be." she said. I couldnt argue with that so off we went. The last time I had been here so had someone else before me & had left big un filled holes. I was really pist off with that & the holes were still there. I pointed them out to Mrs JW. Oh...they are big she said. Not holding my breath I rigged up & got in to it. This area has had all the overburden ground sluiced off from the oldtimers right down to schist bed rock. I had done well here back with the 3000, 4500, GMT & GB2 until I was getting no more. Not 1 minute in to it & I backed up on what I thought was a very very faint signal on top of the schist bed rock. Well I'll be buggered. It was repetitive with each sweep. All be it ever so faint. Probably a lead pellet. Bit of a scrape of the top & it improved but was still in the schist. Down now in to the schist & getting deeper & better. Down in to a small deeper crevice in the schist. How small is that. You can just see it on the coil in the above pic. What gobsmacked me was the depth for such a small piece. A few minutes later. Another very very faint signal. Exactly the same scenario. Down in to a deeper schist crevice Then another faint signal & down in to the schist wash. Wasnt in a crevice or schist bed rock but down a wee bit. Still bloody small. Then it dawned on me that I hadnt got one crap target. Just gold gold gold. One after the other. Shows how heavily this ground has been detected. No crap signals left. I then wondered over to one of the unfilled dig holes & waved the coil in to it & around the outside. What was that?? A signal. I backed up & on the top outside edge of the hole was a definite signal. I scraped away at it & it was still there Gold it was. Another very small bit. You may just make it out beside the G on the coil. If not....here you go... I walked back towards where Mrs JW was sitting waving the coil as I went ready to pack up & head off when I saw another shallow scrape from some one else in to the up on edge schist bed rock. Ha....they must have got a wee thin bit stuck in the on edge folds of schist. And as I do..... I waved the coil over there scrape. Well I'll be darned....a faint signal. Must me another thin piece jambed in there some where. They cant have re scanned there dig after recovering their target before moving on. BIG mistake. Well to cut a long dig short. It wasnt a shallow bit & I ended up having to smash in to the solid schist rock. No way I thought. Felt the pain for my pick....not to mention me trying to dig the bugger. Mrs JW was pissing herself with all the grunting & groaning coming from me. You may have to come back for it, she said. No way I said. This is going to be gold & I aint leaving it here. It still wasnt out at this stage. Look at all that smashed out schist. Oh...my poor pick Oh well....back in to it Look at the depth in to that soild schist & Mrs JW having a good laugh....at my exspense Finally it was out Ended up with 6 bits for .88 of a gram Now I realised that on my very first day with the Zed that there was something very special about this detector. For me it was the depth it was getting small gold at. I realized that any bigger gold would take care of its self. I cant fathom why there was so much bagging of this detector from so many when it first came out. I can only put it down to people being so stuck in their detecting habbit ways with the PI's. The Zed is a different beast & needs to be used as such. I guess I am lucky that & a bit of water has flowed under the bridge since its release & learning curves been learned & I have benefited from that. One thing that really stands out for me is from what JP said. Be conservative with your settings. When I first used it I had the threshold up a bit & the sensitivity to the point where it was running a little bit ratty. Just like I did with the 3000 & 4500. Getting that top end max out of it. The thing with the Zed is the faintest of signals still lift with the thing toned down a bit & so getting rid of that Zed warble, especially with JP's B&Z Booster system. The swing arm helps immensely too. I wouldnt be with out it to get that total coil swing control. Even & parallel to the ground. Mrs JW & I did go out yesterday for a detect with a bit of success. We are in for a few crap weather days so this will be my last report for 2016. Will do yesterdays outing in the new Year. Cheers guys. All the best to you all for 2017 Happy New Year JW
    12 likes
  21. The devil made me do it JP (thread hijack), got by son on first 19 patch on 23rd what a way to blood his 19. Using your conservative settings, son sends his thanks. 29.1 grams
    12 likes
  22. On a PC or tablet just below the menu bar on left you will see a little house icon and the word Home. Clicking on Home will always take you to the top of the forum structure which is at http://www.detectorprospector.com/forum/ There are two major sections, Metal Detecting & Gold Prospecting Forums (the active forums) and Archive - Closed To Active Posting Home will take you to both together but you can also access each one separately. If you do that, the other section will not be visible, so Home is the safe bet. Here is the Home Page: There are five new forums open to posting: Metal Detecting For Coins & Relics Metal Detecting For Jewelry Metal Detecting For Meteorites Gold Panning, Sluicing, Dredging, Drywashing, Etc Rocks, Minerals, Gems & Geology Several archives which corresponded to these new forums were deleted after the content was moved to the new forums. I also moved some newer threads to the appropriate forums, which is why you see quite a few threads on each forum already. Most people here who are interested in things as they have been can just continue on here as if nothing has happened. If you are interested in all the forums, become familiar with the Unread Content option. This will collect all new content for you in one location. I will monitor the forums and move threads if need be to the correct forums. Other than that, if you have friends who might want to share the new locations with you let them know. Thanks!
    12 likes
  23. I too, love the poems of Robert W. Service . The summer nights, at my grandfather's claim on West Nelson creek. He would recite the poems from memory by the glowing warmth of the campfire . The flickering fire, the creek flowing, were the only other sounds to be heard, as he spoke. Those were some wonderful memories that I hold dear.
    11 likes
  24. This forum exists in large part due to good people being run off or at least put off by the behavior on other forums. I was dismayed to find that by responding in kind to a**holes I was myself becoming an a**hole! After an epic blow-up on an Aussie forum I decided to start this forum to protect my own peace of mind. In the process I wanted to create a haven for knowledgeable people like JP for very selfish purposes. JP flat out knows his stuff and I want to hear what he has to say! People that act to shut him down and others like him are just hurting us all. Knowledge is everything in this business. So yes, JP and others like him are quite welcome here. Thanks JW.
    11 likes
  25. Hi guys, After working on my schist columns all day, & Mrs JW had a wedding to video, I buggered off at about 5pm & headed back to where I got those last 8 little bits. I planned on going a bit further over from where I had been going the last couple of times. Still, the spot I chose was an area where I had done well with the GP 3000 & 4500 but was no longer getting gold there with the 4500. I dont think though that I had used the Elite coils here. Any way......I parked up & walked to the spot. Got rigged up & hit an area of semi exposed bed rock schist that the old timers had surface washed. Not even a minute in to it & I had a soft faint signel. Scraped about 1.5 inches off it & that lifted the signal So I laid in to the dig with a bit more effort. Next minute. Oh no....you b**tard. Shite bugger damn. Those last few times that I had been smashing into that solid schist to get a few signals out had taken there toll on my pick. I knew I felt the pain for my pick at the time. Didnt I say so. What do I do??? Pack up & come back later with another pick?? Maybe I will just keep detecting & mark spots where I get a signal & then come back & dig them. I picked up the head of the pick & had a go at scraping & digging as best I could. So...scrape scrape dig dig...wasnt too bad actually. Down in to the schist bed rock which was actually quite rotten & soft & broke out easily Ye Ha. A nice little bit of the good stuff. Not five feet away, another very faint signal...I think. Some times you just think you here a slight hiccup in the threshold or just a hunch that it was a signal as it isnt all ways there with each sweep of the coil. I gave it a few scrapes any way. The hint of a signal improved so I kept on going down in to the schist bed rock. Into a few crevices A small bit of gold And again Another small bit This just kept on happening & no crap signals. All gold. Have detected here so often that there is no crap targets left. Bonus now. Look at the depth. I was lucky that this schist was rotten & soft & peeled away easily Nice piece Deep in to another schist crevice Loving the no crap tagets. Just GOLD The signals just kept on coming Thought I saw a bit of rusty crap come out of this hole, as it was a loud sharp signal as well But no Actually got two bits out of that dig Down in to a deep schist crevice Time out & a look at the finds so far In to the schist bed rock again The hand was getting a bit sore as some of these digs were quite deep And getting deeper But still the gold was coming & all off thrashed ground. Loving the Zed. Two bits from this hole Well it was time to head out & back to the wagon. All up 13 bits for 5.33 grams. Sure beat the other days 57 bits for 4.55 grams The Zed just keeps on blowing me away. What a machine. Thanks guys. Best of luck to you out there JW kiwijw
    11 likes
  26. Hi Guys. Took the Zed for a late afternoon walk back to one of my well flogged patches. Took my spare pick after breaking my good old faithful Walco pick last time I was out. I continued on from where I left off the previous time. The ground was a little bit lively as we had a heavy down pour of rain during the previous night. The Zed was a bit more touchy but after several ground balances over the ferrite & a few auto tunes I got it to a manageable steady threshold with out having to change any of the other settings. 5 minutes in to it & my first very faint little signal. Couple of scrapes & it was out. Ten feet away & more of a hunch that there was a signal & not very convincing at that. Gave it a few scrapes & it improved very slightly but was now sounding like a very faint signal. So I scraped on down until I hit the schist bed rock. Which wasnt far down. You will just make it out in the pic Signal had really improved now so I scraped out two crevices that had opened out in the hole. I had brought a screwdriver today to scrape out just such crevices....& bingo. A sassy bit of gold Before I back filled the dig I scanned the hole & the dug out dirt pile. Another wee signal down in the crevice. Another little bit of gold Again I scanned the dig out pile & the fainest of signals & another tiny bit of gold I stopped for a bite to eat & a coffee before carrying on. Had a bit of a dry spell for a while before another very faint little signal. Again....down in the schist bed rock Tiny gold it was This a pic looking down slope of the exposed schist bed rock tilted up on edge. And this is looking up hill to the dig of the last wee piece of gold This is a surfaced area from the old timers. That little shallow gutter running up to the left produced many bits of gold for the GP 3000, the 4500 & now for the Zed Just to the right of that green bush (briar rose) is an old small throw out pile from the old timers & is where I got the next three tiny bits of gold from. I called it quits at that & had got 8 bits for a grand total of 1.34 grams Smallest was .04 of a gram & the biggest was two at .31 of a gram. Cheers Good luck out there JW kiwijw
    10 likes
  27. "Don't leave gold to find gold". (Todd Hoffman needs to learn this one)
    10 likes
  28. Hey Steve and All, Just to clarify, the guy that shared the picture with me is close friends with the finder. They are finding some very nice gold in that area, but it's all private. I also stated it was found in the lower desert region, which is was. I never stated the US, but guys on my forum wanted to play the guessing game. I'm not the finder nor owner, so I was asked to not share the picture anywhere else in request of the finder. He obviously wanted to share it with Minelab, or someone he knew shared it with them. The majority of nugget shooters are not going to tell the location of a great find, so I respected his request and I didn't post any specifics. Hope this clarifies somewhat.
    10 likes
  29. I was recently helping my good ol friend Norm on his claim known for huge gold. He was digging, I was detecting . I got a booming signal, told him to go a little deeper . Bam, out pops this massive lump of gold. It was almost to heavy for the machine . Well got to go, got to strap this huge nugget down on the lowboy and head to the auction . Bidding starts at 1 million dollhairs.
    10 likes
  30. Now that the feline is out of the sack I'll give you all 2 cents worth of review and opinion of the 19"GPZ coil. Evidence indicates that when VA Paul left Australia last year he snuck out all of the Australian nuclear secrets, their plans to hack the 2020 American elections, the formula for Fosters beer and a 19'' GPZ coil. He made me use the coil first to see if Minelab assassins where following us to recover their coil. In the short time I used the coil, this is what I learned. All indications are that it will detect deeper. Your pick must be further away and it is more prone to pick up incidental metal such as zipper tabs. 30% deeper is only 10% less silly than claiming 40% even if Ml. does add an *. It does run smoother. You can use somewhat "hotter" settings than the 14" but it will still give a good sounding signal on bits of hot ground. There may be a bit more sensitivity to EMI. You need to slow your swing down significantly and keep it parallel to the ground. This also makes it easier to stop your swing and reverse direction. It will false when bumped on something solid but not enough to be a concern. Pin pointing is a pain in the a-- (arm). I have become immune ti this pain from my having spent a year with the 7000. Did you notice the little tray on VA Pauls coil. DON'T LAUGH! It actually works for tiny finds. In Pauls' posted photos, only one of the nuggets might not have been found with the 14" coil. However the area has been covered many times with a stock GPZ. but I have not spent enough time with the new coil to make a definitive statement like "more gold" or "deeper Gold" But I believe those statements will come. It is just plain HEAVY. Unless you are built funny, have no common sense or your just plain not to bright (yup, that's me) get your self some kind of suspension system. no gold is worth screwing up an arm or a shoulder. In conclusion I will say that the 19" coil is not magic. if you are not finding gold with a stock 7000 the bigger coil probably won"t help. They are, to me, unreasonably expensive and the history of Minelab dropping the price of the 7000 so soon after it's introduction still doesn't set well with a lot of early buyers so I probably won't tie up winter time beer money on a coil I can' use until next spring.
    10 likes
  31. Hi guys. I went out for a three hour detect late friday afternoon to an area I hadnt been to for a couple of years. I was surprised at how much sweet briar rose, thyme, broom & black berry growth there had been since I was last here. I struggled swinging the 14" coil on the Zed. So it wasnt a very eventful session. I did manage to get a very faint signal in a section of exsposed up on edge schist that did turn out to be a .3 gram bit of gold. Due to the tight detecting spaces I gave up with just that one piece & headed home. I got up early saturday morning & packed my gear & a bit of tucker & thermos of coffee & headed off on a 2.5 hour drive to an area for a full days detecting. After negotiating in 4 wheel drive a bit of rough country & driving up & down gullies & spurs, arrived at my spot that I call Doug's Gully. Named after the chap who put me on to it quite a few years ago. It is an area I have done quite well on with my 3000, 4500 & now I was going to try the Zed. Got all rigged up. Fresh batteries in the B & Z booster, fully charged battery in the Zed. Pick belt on & harness on I went to the front pocket of my back pack to get the fully charged WM12 to hook up.....& WHAT...no way...your kidding. No bloody WM12. I had left it on the charger back home. I couldnt believe it. What was I going to do now? Turn around & go back home. No cant do that. I had the Gold Bug 2 which I use in conjunction with the Zed as my pin pointer & discriminator. I knew I wasnt going to get any decent gold or gold at depth. But what choice did I have. I had in the past used the Bug in a few places down this gully with some success, but not down the entire gully. Oh well...better than nothing. So off I went. This little gully is not a running creek at any time. Well not for a very very long time any way. This is the very bottom of the narrow gully floor. It rises from this up to spurs either side. This is looking up the gully & I got a faint signal at the base of that sarson stone, or siliceous cement stone. These consist of quartz sands & gravels that have been cemented into a compact stone by the infiltration of siliceous waters. The cement stones were known to the miners as "Chinamen". They were favored by the miners as being associated with gold deposits. They had a believe that if you got above the chinamen then you were above the gold. So all those big rocks & boulders you will see in these picks they are those cement stones. Signal turned out to be a thin slither of gold. As I wondered on down this gully I came to quite a large cement stone cutting right across the narrow gully floor. My thoughts were that if water & gold ever did flow down this gully then this stone would be a perfect trap damming across the flow & any gold caught on its up stream side & down stream side if it acted like a giant riffle. I paid a lot of attention detecting all over, around all the edges & every little crack or hollow in the stone itself. First three signals were shot gun pellets. The first out of this hole & the 2nd to the hollow to the left My fourth signal & no reason why it shouldnt be another pellet from just beside the scoop. But it was a bit of gold. Ye Ha Then another signal in that hole beside the coil Another small bit of gold Then another Looking up the gully & the cement stone blocking across the floor I had back in my GP 3000 days got some better bits at the bottom of this stone. But none there this day. The gully widened out in a few places. Looking up gully you can see here the remains of the old timers throw out piles either side of the gully. Here on that bald bit I got a signal This is looking across the gully, detector in the same spot as previous shot This was the signal Then probably the biggest bit for the day I found this gin trap with the 3000 quite a few years earlier. It was still sitting where I had left it These little finds kept on popping up & then I hit a little glory hole of many tiny bits of gold the more I dug down in to the schist I wont bore you with all those but ended up for the day with 37 little pieces including a little speci for the grand total of 2.09 grams. The speci itself was .4 of a gram so it shows how tiny the rest of the gold was. Was a fun day but dont think I will forget my WM12 again in a hurry. Cheers Good luck out there JW kiwijw
    9 likes
  32. I was looking at some old metal detector catalogs and got a chuckle out of these charts from the 1973 Garrett catalog. People get up in arms about advertising claims these days but get a look at these. To their credit they say "large metal objects" and do not define what that is (dump truck?) but we are talking 1973 BFO detectors here. I need to ditch my new detectors and get one of those old machines! Unfortunately depths were measured in inches then, not feet, on normal targets. The irony is the page is addressing "misleading advertising".
    9 likes
  33. 9 likes
  34. With my hearing, I would like to have target signal hooked up to a shock collar!
    9 likes
  35. A pretty fascinating set of photos posted over at http://md-hunter.com/homemade-metal-detector-amazing-photos/
    9 likes
  36. A Park Selection Primer for the aspiring Jewelry Detectorist – My Method Image: Urban prospecting for refined gold The jewelry detectorist is a different breed. They tend to like a challenge, a challenge to both their selves and their skills. The jewelry detectorist may also be creative, a bit stubborn, and generally think outside the box due to the elusive nature of their quarry. Certainly they have little fear of work. Compared to the average butterfly, the jewelry detectorist accepts more digging and more trash as part of the game and they often enjoy it. When a choice patch is discovered they will happily work the same park for many years by working smartly in layers. Some patches might even merit a more serious approach; dig it all to get it all – nails and up get it all! Nobody except avid historic relic hunters tend to get so extreme on a site. There is no doubt many other detectorists find jewelry, but to the jewelry detectorist that targets gold jewelry those other detectorist’s recoveries are quite often incidental in their searches and they tend to fall mostly into the large and/or high conductive range. One can verify this by (assuming the reports are truthful) looking at hundreds of annual “Best finds of the year” and “Wrap-up Annual Totals” type forum posts on any metal detecting forum – heavy on the silver; light on gold. An avid gold jewelry detectorist often targets only the low to upper middle conductivity and will find gold items regularly and lesser valued “trash” jewelry almost every trip to a patch in working progress. This primer is meant to address jewelry hunting in general and gold jewelry hunting specifically and how I’ve discovered to locate patches time and again. The intent is to help any detectorist find more gold jewelry by placing them into a “patch”. I liken it to one more piece to the Au puzzle. (Credit to Mr. Mike Hillis for inspiring me to write something hobby related and introducing to me through his writing, the term ‘patch’, which I’m adopting. Thank you.) Image 1: 14K designer wedding band recovered from a city park. Let’s get to it then. Assumption one – Generally the more quantity of jewelry a site holds the more gold that site also tends to hold. Assumption two – Gold can be found anywhere but it tends to be found more frequently in certain locations and conditions. Just like people gold is predictable, and just like people gold can surprise you. Assumption three – Adults lose the most and most valuable gold. Follow where they play, entertain, socialize. Follow the money. I also use a simple 5 stars or 5 point rating system on parks. Each factor that positively applies to a park equals one point. At 3 points a half point scheme kicks in and allows some wiggle room when filtering the best from the best. A half point is generally reserved for multiple features, special features, community events, etc. This rating system is meant to assist in field time management. In selecting a site in search of gold jewelry there are several factors that contribute to specific sites being better prospects for gold than others. These “better” parks possess several of the factors and features that positively contribute to increased loss thus increased productivity. The scope of this work will be limited in the main to those contributing factors that make one park better than another. Features within a park will be considered outside the scope of this work except when related. The four primary factors in summary: U.T.H.H. 1. Usage – All the various kinds of use currently allowed and permitted in a given park. 2. Topography – All the facts about the park’s property- size, type, elevation, grade, vegetation, layout, etc. 3. Habitat – The physical surroundings immediately adjacent to the park. This can include the perimeter of a park property. 4. History – all the past details of a park prior to establishment to present. This builds a park profile to assist in detection strategy. Usage - The current usage and allowed activities in any park is the primary consideration. The more opportunities a park has for strenuous physical exercise and/or athletic contact between groups of people the better. Parks that support large open fields favored for athletics often double as community event locations. Pay attention to your local event calendars to increase the chances of finding a prime site. A new use of parks I’m seeing more communities adopt is the summer outdoor viewing of a featured “Movie in the park” on Friday or Saturday nights complete with vendors. These events are perfect for losing stuff in the dark. Another common event in parks in my area are those community fundraising “After Five” events with live bands, alcohol, and lots of people overdressed and milling about. Often they are so packed people stand shoulder to shoulder rubbing and bumping even when not dancing. The more varied uses a park sees the better the prospects for gold. Topography -The type of terrain in a park is important. For turf hunting at least, gold tends to be found in the flats more than the hills. The land’s grade is important. Nobody is playing team sports in the hills. Large groups of people do not usually congregate in the hills either, and have less incentive to do so in the woods. Focus primarily on flat open terrain. One exception to this: hilly parks with trees and disc golf courses - gold could literally be anywhere on a disc golf course. Also, don’t get too hung up on total park size. While a large park is great for accommodating large crowds for events, many smaller parks are often better prospects when they contain a greater percentage of level open surface areas. In discussing city parks I consider small parks to be 10 acres or less. Parks around 60+ acres I consider large. Habitat – If a park were a living organism then the surrounding community is the natural habitat. In locations with few public parks the surrounding habitat becomes a more important aspect of site selection. There are certain surrounding features that positively impact a park. Any school or church that shares a property boundary with a park is notable. Any apartments, condos, or townhomes sharing a boundary with a park is notable. Single family homes sharing a property boundary are more common and are less notable than the other types of surrounding habitat except for county parks and rest-stop parks. Don’t discount the remote county parks completely though. Keep in mind the first two factors when evaluating them as a potential prospect. Other things we want to consider in our evaluation of surrounding habitat include adjacent streets, off-street parking, ease of pedestrian access, demographics, population density, and proximity of other parks, or park density. Find a park that rates highly in these aspects and one might more easily forgive a deficiency in factor one or two. History - It’s important to know as much history on a park as possible. The age, past use, past detecting pressure, current use, current detecting pressure and any historic images and maps all interest us in evaluating a park’s best potential to hold gold. Some history must be inferred, such as detecting pressure, but these days many county governments and city Park and Recreation departments list all the other facts online. In my area select parks are even provided good historical information with images and descriptions of past use. Don’t put too much weight on age of a park. The reason being is that it is possible when a park has the best of the first three factors that a 10, or even 5 year old park in the suburbs will produce more gold than a 60, or even a 100 year old park elsewhere. You gold-a think outside the box! Example Search: I have visited St. Louis for events but never been detecting there. I’ve never visited a park in St. Louis other than the Zoo. I randomly chose a city to illustrate a typical search and actually located a very promising park for anyone in the area. I’d be working it regularly if I lived within 5 miles and it was not prohibited. Image 2: Tilles Park, St. Louis potential area of interest Using Google maps I examine the city first with the map view for likely prospects. A typical search would be entered into the map search bar as: St. Louis school, or St. Louis church. These are not the only parks under consideration, but the locations of these indicators hold a promise of greater success. I generally start from the Downtown area and work outwards in pie segments looking for green shaded parks. Nearby large bodies of water always interest me so I’ll give those areas extra attention. Continuing outwards working in pie segments we note park density, park sizes, and adjacent streets and structures as the initial focus. Major roads that run along a park boundary are notable. Once a promising prospect is located I’ll switch to satellite view and zoom in, examining first images of the park itself looking for clues to the current use, and then the surrounding habitat, structures, and streets afterwards. Just this simple browsing of parks in Google Maps is a huge asset in quickly locating the best potential sites if you use a formula. With this single tool one can quickly cut out a lot of lesser quality parks with occasional random drops and hone in on the likely patches with regular or frequent drops. Image 3: Tilles Park, St. Louis aerial showing a two park comparison. Quickly my eye was drawn by the moderate size of the park, a major road, the dense single family homes, and preliminary usage estimates I infer from experience. I liked the size and especially the two larger streets adjoining the park, Hampton Ave. and Fyler Ave. The nearest park seems to be around a mile away which is close but not too close considering the density of housing. There is a lot of single-family homes between them. Zooming in a bit closer, the positive surrounding features I immediately notice (in addition to the housing densely packed on 3 sides) - two residential streets terminating at the park boundary. That’s a history flag! At this point I strongly suspect this park has some age and the land was used for something else in the relatively recent past. This park warrants a closer inspection and historical research but at this point I wouldn’t rate it any higher than a 3 at best. It has good potential but further research is needed. Image 4: Tilles Park, St. Louis showing an arieal in map view. The Parks department’s website gives an overview. Ordinance Year: 1957 Size: 29.00 Acres. It also lists basketball courts, racquetball Courts, tennis courts, 3 softball fields, one baseball field, a soccer field, a pavilion, a playground, and a skate hockey rink. Outstanding! Features in multiples and a few unique features earn one more point! We’re now a 4 star prospect and I’ve never been there. Image 5: Tilles Park, St. Louis topography map showing elevation Another site like Historic Aerials will assist with confirmation on topography ID and possible past uses. Unfortunately it only goes back to 1958 in St. Louis, but we still can glean information that can inform our actual hunting strategy. Image 6a and 6b: Tilles Park, St. Louis aerial showing park feature history A couple out buildings have been lost near the main structure prior to 1971 (red), and the pavilion had been established by 1958 (green).The park’s vegetation looks stark in 1958. Cycling through the available years trees don’t show up with any size until around the mid-1990. That’s about 40 years of wide-open park land, which means the whole park has good potential to be a nice patch. The walking paths have not been altered. Another important note is the streets have not been widened as of 1996, so plan to extend your coil all the way to the parking. So far I’d have to rate this particular park a solid 4 at this time. If further research reveals regular community events, and/or positive demographics in the surrounding habitat, and/or some historical significance then it might turn this particular park from a 4 into a 4+ and possibly a 5. Tilles Park is one public park I’d spend some serious time getting to know if I lived in St. Louis. It was good fortune in locating such a promising prospect so easily. It doesn’t always go that way. Some locations take hours and others have so few parks there are not any real options. You may have to settle for 2 and 3 star parks in your area, in which case my 3 star becomes your 5 star. Don’t let me box you in - think outside of it! I estimate thousands of parks have very nice undiscovered gold patches and 10,000 more will have at least one gold item lost in them. Locate those patches and you’ll regularly locate the gold. This information comes from my own personal experience and observations gained through thousands of hour’s field time. My methods are fluid and something I’ve developed along the way while working towards my own personal challenge to master this game. Please feel free to critique, make suggestions, add to, question, and challenge what I’ve presented here. This is the first time I’ve put it down in writing…and if you made it this far, thank you for your time. Best of hunting to you!
    9 likes
  37. 9 likes
  38. Gave the nugget a bit of a scrub, looks like it was originally a crystalline piece with clear herring bone structures on one side. I've found a few pieces at this location that have shown signs of being crystalline, this one would have been beautiful in its original state. I've also included a picture of the terrain where I was working, the solid skid plate I was testing for Nugget Finder made it possible to detect here. The GPZ 19 coil needs to move in a clean smooth arc to generate a signal off deep faint targets, jerky discontinuous movements are really bad for this type of detecting, a smooth one piece skid plate helps no end in acquiring that freedom of movement. JP
    9 likes
  39. 8 likes
  40. Hey all :) I know quartz and quartz crystals are among the most common things one finds while out prospecting. Thing is you never know when you'll get an added treat for bending down and picking up that interesting shiny. I found this last season down under after a good 3 km romp thru the bush. I'd come into an area with a lot of faceted milky quartz and picked up my first lump thinking it'd be a good example of the area. It got heavy so I put it down and decided I'd find a smaller bit. A few dozen meters away a smaller quartzy plate flashed and caught my eye. The clear quartz is very uncommon in the heavy mineral mixes that I was prospecting so into the back pack it went. My booby prize if I didn't hit any gold for the day :) Well I did poke around for a few minutes but didn't find anything else of interest, either detecting or specking, and thought to myself I could find the spot again and maybe give it a better go the next day. I'd not found any gold yet and it was later in the day back near camp *of course* that I finally got a small reward for the walk. So my shiny was now not the booby prize for the day. But little did I know till the next morning when I pulled it out again and gave it a good gander. Looking into the depths I saw that many of the crystals showed Phantoms inside. Phantom crystals are crystals that form twice with the original crystal being covered by the second growth. That had me pretty happy as I've only ever found one other example. While rotating it in the light of morning I caught a flash of Gold! Well I broke out the 10x magnifier and yep, on top of a very small Phantom crystal a small gold crystal had begun to form and over that the second layer of clear quartz. Small stuff, sure, but a fine find for me. Well a long story short~ nope I could not find the spot again after two goes. But hey Quartz with a twist definitely made my day. Thanks for reading
    8 likes
  41. "In the absence of the gold standard, there is no way to protect savings from confiscation through inflation. There is no safe store of value. If there were, the government would have to make its holding illegal, as was done in the case of gold. . . . The financial policy of the welfare state requires that there be no way for the owners of wealth to protect themselves. This is the shabby secret of the welfare statists' tirades against gold. Deficit spending is simply a scheme for the confiscation of wealth." --Alan Greenspan, 1966
    8 likes
  42. this guy Flat Killed It on this Dive! Makes You think? Looks Like Fun! Worth Watching! Cheers from Idaho.Sorry if this was already posted before Dunno
    8 likes
  43. "There’s gold, and it’s haunting and haunting; It’s luring me on as of old; Yet it isn’t the gold that I’m wanting So much as just finding the gold." From The Spell of the Yukon by Robert W. Service
    8 likes
  44. Your Minelab native silver article was an enjoyable read Chris, as was your instructive native silver thread started here a short while ago. Frankly I've never paid much attention to pricing, but yes it is shocking to me to learn what even dealers will pay for material that I can't be bothered bringing home. I recently posted an article to TreasureNet entitled Recreational Prospecting in the Silverfields of Northeastern Ontario at http://www.treasurenet.com/forums/metal-detecting-gold/525046-recreational-prospecting-silverfields-northeastern-ontario.html should you have any interest or spare time. Emphasis is placed on effectively searching abandoned minesite tailings disposal areas characterized by an overabundance of iron and other miscellaneous modern waste materials while employing VLF units. References to F75 and the White's MXT are frequent in regard to discussions about features and their usages in such environs. That's it for now, your ideas interest me... good luck with your tentative plans. Jim.
    8 likes
  45. River has stabilized now. The roads are a little nessy now.
    8 likes
  46. Hi all from my limited experience l would have to say most of the quiet faint signals have mainly been slight variations in the threshold response rather than the audio response. However there is usually a fair amount of what l would call spurious detector noise going on at the same time but l was able to pick out the slight threshold variation amongst the spurious noise. It is this background spurious noise that would render lights and or vibrations unusable because mostly the quiet threshold breaks are quiter than the spurious noise but are disernable to the ear. If you are strugling to hear the threshold breaks because your hearing. I would suggest getting a set of earphones with individual volume and tone control for each ear as like our eyesight we usually have better sight out of one eye than the other and the same applies to hearing one side hears better than the other and it is that imbalance that affects what we hear and what we don't. So by adjusting the individual volume controls to ensure our hearing is equally balanced will enhance you ability to distinguish the faint threshold breaks. Balancing out your hearing is better than blasting out you hearing by using too much volume to compensate. Use tones that are comfortable to your hearing.
    8 likes
  47. I'll save myself a lot of trouble. I'm just going to 3D print nuggets.
    8 likes
  48. The best posts are the ones meant to help others...
    8 likes
  49. I decided this season to stop full time gold prospecting and concentrate on prospecting for other minerals. I'll go back to gold primarily if dredging restrictions loosen or a machine a league ahead of the GPZ comes out. Here is part of about a 3ftx4ft pocket of black tourmaline (schorl) I found this summer. Can't wait for the snow to melt off to go back and finish removing it. Anyone else out there switching gears from gold into other minerals? It seems to come easier since we use all the skills we learned and built looking for gold just the same as prospecting for other minerals. I was hoping for a while that a good geology and minerals forum would pop up sans all the LRL/dowsing hocus pocus that others include in their forums as "geology", so I'm posting what I'm up to and hoping some others do as well. Also found a number of different nephrite jade pockets, nothing gemmy yet but still some good stuff. And I'm trying to track down the pocket where this big float terminated smokey came from, but no luck yet.
    8 likes
  50. I don't know that it has gone unnoticed at all Robby just that few people here are very concerned about any of this. The QED shows up and proves it's worth or it does not. This thing has been years in the making. In my opinion to announce the unit is ready for sale, and then reveal that something as basic as what type of battery will be used and where that battery will be located was not thought out, was a very amateurish move and reflects poorly on the credibility of the project. Dave made the same mistake over and over with the Pulse Devil. At least some fully ready working units should have been ready for immediate distribution to testers or purchasers before making the announcement. I was ready to buy the control box only version and sent an email saying just that. I figured it was inexpensive enough a gamble for me to just give it a go and be able to report to forum members what I thought. Then I find out no units available, still trying to decide what battery to use and where it will be located... and now I just don't care. I will just forget about the whole thing until something firm develops and somebody else gets one and reports on it. And that in a nutshell is how they take a person like me that was trying to be fair and open minded and just shut me down.
    8 likes