Lunk

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Lunk last won the day on March 7 2016

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About Lunk

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    Silver Member

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location:
    ID, NV, AZ, CA
  • Interests:
    Gold nuggets, meteorites and treasure with metal detectors
  • Gear Used:
    Minelab GPZ 7000
    Minelab GM 1000 (coming soon)

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  1. Careful Steve - your liable to start another gold rush!😀 Thank you everyone for your thoughts and comments; I'm sure Smokey would have appreciated them.
  2. I would hate to be the guy that was supposed to be guarding that thing. 😳
  3. Sounds like you know all the tricks for squeezing more gold out of those worked out placers; wtg.
  4. Perhaps it was the GRG scoop?
  5. The nugget shooting world lost a legend today: Smokey Baird of Lovelock, Nevada passed away after a battle with cancer. Rest in peace my friend. http://www.billandlindaprospecting.com/smokey.html
  6. Not to be a negative nellie here, but... there are three things in the description of your stone that tell you it most likely is not a meteorite: 1. "It has a paper thin black crust and grey interior..." While most stony meteorites do have a dark fusion crust and lighter colored interior, the fact that your stone's exterior is black raises a red flag. Only a freshly fallen meteorite has a black fusion crust. Once the stone is exposed to the elements for any length of time, its exterior quickly oxidizes to a dark reddish brown color. A freshly fallen meteorite would have been immediately preceded by a fireball, sonic booms, etc. The chances of finding a fresh meteorite without eyewitness accounts and/or doppler radar data to guide you to it are next to zero. The black crust on your stone is most likely a manganese oxide coating. 2. "...my magnet won't stick to it." While there are stony meteorites that aren't attracted to a magnet, they are exceedingly rare. This alone tells you that it most likely is not a meteorite. 3. "There are sparkles inside the rock." Stony meteorites don't have crystalline components large enough to see without magnification and therefore never sparkle. Sparkly stones are definite meteorwrongs.
  7. Happy birthday and congrats on a golden day!
  8. Typically it makes sense to assign the user button to the function you find yourself changing the most during a detecting session. For me it's the Ground Balance Mode.
  9. If I'm interpreting that quote right, it sounds like AKA is saying that they have found a way to detect targets that fall within the ground balance "hole". I know that Minelab already did something like this with the SD-2100 pulse induction where essentially there were two detectors in one, each with its own ground balance control, thereby each one detecting targets that fell within the others ground balance hole. Perhaps AKA is doing something similar with VLF?
  10. Me too, as high as 15! It took awhile to get used to the fact that the Sensitivity function of the Zed is a completely different animal than the Gain feature of the GPX detectors.
  11. Great post, JW! Lots of good advice from a very experienced, albeit embarrassed operator. 😊 I hope the Zed-wielders out there pay particular attention to this bit: Although Jonathan Porter has also stressed the importance of these types of conservative settings, few have caught on to just how effective they really are. Great detecting as always JW.
  12. I don't think I could sit there pondering before finding out how big that monster is...😀 Welcome to the forum, Will!
  13. My goal is to be the first person to detect on Mars, but if I only make it as far as the land downunder I'll be happy. 😊