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Found 205 results

  1. Toned-down Marketing

    I was cruising through the Minelab website looking for any new bits on the Equinox and came across this marketing video that compares the detectors in the "Treasure Detector" range. I think it's interesting, though not surprising, that the marketing hype is toned-down when the Equinox is compared to the rest of the Minelab range.
  2. Tom(CA) and I have been working a site that we researched that's produced several 1850's - 1860's seated coins, and some rogue early 1900's coins, as well as a variety of period relics. We tried to get one more trip in before Old Man Winter completely shut us down, and it did in fact shut us down, but not before I finally, got something I've been looking for for a long time, and after watching others find them over the years (I saw Tom dig three!!!), I was starting to think it would never happen. Well it finally happened, and it turned out to be a good one, an 1865 San Francisco minted Liberty Half Eagle!! Here she is out of the hole: Here she is rinsed off: Here's a video of the hunt: Less than 100 known, Mintage: 27,612 Although the mintage of the 1865-S is quite a bit higher than the mintages of the S Mint Half Eagles from 1858 to 1864, it compares in overall rarity to the 1858-S, 1860-S and 1863-S and is only slightly less rare than the others. Almost all known examples of this date are well worn with VF and lower being all one can expect to find. The 1865-S ranks second in the entire $5 series according to average grade and I do not know of a specimen that would grade better than EF. The very few specimens that I have seen were rather softly struck and the mintmark was always quite weak. Thanks for looking, hopefully the next one comes easier
  3. Published on Aug 15, 2017 - In this video we work on finding a promising area to set up the gold dredge and then get it up and running. We work it for a day. In the end, I pan out my concentrates, but did not capture the final pans. But I think it's an interesting video and I hope you enjoy watching it as much as I did making it.
  4. Jeff Williams is kinda corny but here we learn about finding gold in a desert wash with eyeballs and dowsing rods, how to recognize alkali deposits as a source of shallow water in the desert, rock formations, volcanic plugs, dikes, contact zones and such
  5. Tom Boykins Nevada Adventure

    This is a four day adventure that Tom Boykin and a friend recently went on to Nevada. Day 2 will air next week. Tom is with White's Electronics and we are lucky to have him here as a forum member. New videos in the series will be posted on this thread as they come out. Part of the four day adventure will be at the recently held Rye Patch Nugget Shoot. There is a tiny peek at the new White's prototype - see if you can spot it!
  6. Published on Sep 18, 2017 - Beau and I landed in England. We spent our first day sight-seeing. At Detectival, I ran into Dr. Tones. We hit the fields together in search of ancient treasure.
  7. Makes Ya Think

    I just found this and as funny as it is It makes ya think and maybe we should be a bit more carful. J.
  8. Here is day 1 of my recent trip to Tyndrum, Scotland. Tyndrum is more prospective than my usual panning location but is also twice the distance, so here's hoping the gold shows make the extra journey worth the trip:
  9. Here is the video of day 4 & of of my recent gold prospecting trip to Scotland, working a large bedrock slab then moving on to a new hole
  10. Here is day 3 of my recent trip to Scotland gold prospecting and finally start to find a few pickers
  11. This may surprise a few , and make some go back to places known . jed martin sent you a video_ _Finally I Know The S.eml
  12. Here is day 2 of my recent trip to Scotland with a few more shows of gold turning up in the pan
  13. Last weekend I got to tag along with Josh and Tom Bohmker, and a few other knowledgable miners. The destination was the Briggs Pocket in Southern Oregon. This was not an easy hike for some of the crew, but we all made it out and back. We did have one guy fall down a steep slope, but Josh was able to catch him before he tumbled down to the bottom. The video tells some of the history of this famous pocket mine as well as how Josh and his family have used modern P.I. detectors to recover the gold left on the hillside by previous generations of miners. Of all types of metal detecting for gold, I would count pocket hunting as the most difficult - due to the terrain, research, and extensive geology knowledge required. It's something not many people have the patience for (me included), so I have to say I admire the gumption of the Bohmker family - they discovered the Briggs Pocket just two weeks before another party and have pulled a lot of gold out of their claim. The gold from the Briggs Pocket tends to be spongey and interwound with the host rock (quartz). I will post some journal excerpts at the bottom of this post in case you'd like to read some historical accounts as well. But here's the video: Every time I see Josh and Tom I learn so much about the geology of gold. Anyone who has an interest in pocket hunting might want to look them up. They do go on regular expeditions with folks, which I believe they run through their website. I thought you guys might like a virtual tour of the Briggs Pocket - since this forum is where I got started on my journey of searching for gold. HISTORICAL ACCOUNTS Briggs History: (As recorded by the Mining Review, Salt Lake City, Utah bi monthly publication) June 30, 1904 Discovery of a mammoth pocket near the head waters of sucker creek, forty miles south of Grants Pass. The discovery was made by the two sons of David Briggs, while out hunting, and was purely accidental as they stumbled across it while trailing a deer. They have already brought in $6,000 from the pocket, and believe they will bring as much more before the glory hill is emptied. Much of the gold was in great slabs as big as a man's hand, and all of it came from a shallow cut, but three feet wide, three feet deep, and but six feet in length. July 15th, 1904 The Rush is still on to the new Eldorado up in the siskiyous, beyond Holland, and on the Oregon California line. I took the fever and joined the caravan, mainly for the purpose of satisfying a curiosity, but not an idle one, for it is to severe a strain on a scribblers physical make up to climb twenty miles almost straight up just to see what is going on over the divide. ......................... We found about 100 men scattered about the head of Thompson and Indian creeks, a number of whom had taken up claims. A townsite has been surveyed, and the town will be know as "Goldenview City" The strike made by Briggs has already taken out $25,000 in gold. Contented in the truth that want will never more drive them out of unbefitting toil, they are satisfied with the life of the mountains. Here is the freedom no other land can give, the genuine freedom of the western outer world. It was these mountains that gave up bountifully from their long hidden treasures. And they who were so fortunately endowed with not forget the giver. _ Dennis H Stovall Records indicate that this was worked for two seasons, and there was a group that braved the winter and worked through. In the end, the strike led to a rush up there of over 2000 men, almost everything was claimed up, and many smaller strikes were made within the vicinity. I don't think the town of Goldenview ever came to pass. They (Briggs) sold the claim and staked a new claim not far away. A company from Chicago invested substantial money into developing the mine, but turned up nothing, or at least not enough to be profitable. By June of 2005, there was no more reports on the Briggs strike.
  14. Its been a while since my last prospecting trip so managed to get a week away at the end of last month, here`s day 1 of my trip
  15. Brandon Neice i.e. "Dr. Tones" discusses metal detecting for gold jewelry...
  16. I was watching a video on the Scuba Tector on how it wouldn't detect gold chains but looking at another it showed detecting coins great. I click on another brand and this guy was swinging it around like he was trying to kill a fly under water. I've seen this so many times with this guy giving a demonstration on a detector and you can tell he don't know what end is up when it comes to a detector. Every time he'd make a swing with it the back swing was 20 degrees off from the other. It looked as if they told him we have a coin here and a ring over there. The only trouble they didn't tell him how many targets he past up. My best advise I can give to a detector company on their next video ad is just get someone that's had one in their hands more than the day of the shoot Chuck.
  17. A nice overview of why some people like to go metal detecting. This is a bit of an experiment as an embedded Facebook video so let me know if it does not work for you.
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