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Found 26 results

  1. I've had a lot of machines come and go since I began the hobby. One machine I will not part with is my V3i. About a year ago at tax return time money was no object in the realm of hobby machines. I could plunk down cash on a CTX-3030, XP Deus or trade up to a V3i. It was a difficult decision and one that required research, and even hands on testing to determine what was the best fit for me. The following is a compilation of the arguments that convinced me to go with a V3i: The V3i is a true 3 frequency machine. FBS machines, although the claim is made that they TRANSMIT 28 frequencies, apparently only USE (transmit, receive and process) only 2 fundamental frequencies (3.125khz, 25khz). http://www.dankowskidetectors.com/discussions/read.php?2,24272,page=1Those frequencies emit harmonic byproducts which are not actually utilized, but which any machine can claim to transmit. Whites could follow this business philosophy and claim to transmit 42 or more, but this is not helpful. The V3i can operate in single frequency mode. The CTX-3030 cannot. Being able to operate in single frequency mode provides a depth and speed advantage as all the power of the the machine is dedicated to that particular frequency rather than divided up among many. Conversely, the XP Deus operates in selectable single frequencies, but cannot process them simultaneously, putting it at a disadvantage in discrimination and higher mineralization . The V3i is true SIMULTANEOUS multifrequency, meaning all 3 frequencies are transmitted at the same time. Often what is referred to as "simultaneous" is a loose interpretation of the term. What is really happening is their frequencies are transmitted in a timed automated sequence and processed in the time domain rather than simultaneously. This approach causes a greater delay in recovery and target separation often overlooking good targets in iron infested sites. The V3i offers by far the most access to feature parameters that are usually only available to the manufacturer. When features are locked to certain specific presets a machine will perform reasonably well across most conditions, but will not be optimized. The V3i offers you the option of optimizing its performance in any conditions. This has caused many novice and even experienced detectorists to become intimidated by the V3i. Don't be. The V3i has turn on and go modes and factory defaults like any other machine. In every endeavor the V3i seeks to offer the best of both worlds. It offers you the chance to reach your full potential across all mediums in your own time as you figure out what works best for you, or simply use factory programs. The Spectragraph. This allows the user to see what is going on with any one or all three of the frequency it utilizes. It is more information and tell tale signs to help determine the size and composition of the target. It is more information to help determine whether to dig or not to dig. VDI systems are imperfect predictors on every machine. Many variables affect its accuracy and so it is just one consideration among many regarding whether to dig or not to dig. The V3i is more consistently "hot" across the spectrum of metals than either the Deus and CTX-3030. You'll often notice in the forums that smaller gold is not the strong suit of FBS machines. Due to their configuration, they favor high conductors and overlook smaller gold. The Deus in similar fashion needs a whole different and very expensive coil to notice small, low conductors such as gold. (With the Deus, this is the equivalent of buying a whole new metal detector, because the coil IS the metal detector. The pod only deals with information. That is why it is referred to as a "remote." That's all it truly is. So each time you purchase a coil you are forced to buy all the other hardware that is usually housed in the control box over and over again. These coils will necessarily have to be serviced at some point due to its hardwired battery. The likelihood of long term failure of such a configuration is concerning as well considering that all the sensitive electronics are housed in the most vulnerable part of the machine. Imagine taking your control box off and bumping it up against stubby corn stalks, rocks, tree trunks and other hard mediums over an extended period of time.)
  2. Is this detector any good for prospecting for what it costs? Pros & Cons Thanks Bill
  3. New To Me VX3

    The mail delivered my VX3...put batteries in it and took it to my test garden....wow , blew me away.....tried it with the 950 coil and 6x10 coil......waiting for my ultimate 13" coil . I got a couple of hunted places I want to try. So far....VERY HAPPY . I have an MXT but this is a different critter for sure.
  4. V3 , V3i , VX3

    Has anyone used one of these machines in AZ, I went to my local dealer and was told the V3i was not good in AZ, I should get a F75.... Wanted some other opinion on using one in AZ, I live in the Kingman area and want to hunt coins. I have an OLD MXT and would like to get a newer , top of the line coin hunter. Tried hunting gold but due to leg damage I have trouble walking in the dessert . Took a bad fall a couple of days ago , bruised some ribs. Made me think I need to hunt for coins, tot lots nd such. OK , 'nough of my crap . Any opinions... Thanks
  5. White's Dfx Versus V3i On Gold

    I have been bouncing back and forth between the White's DFX and V3i for many years. In theory the switch to V3i should be a no-brainer. However, the original Vision model I got had bad EMI issues in Anchorage, Alaska, especially with buried power lines. When the V3i came out I tried again with no joy. When I moved to Reno I tried again, and EMI was less a problem. The next issue is the main reason I have a DFX is to run a BigFoot coil. Most coils need to be tuned for the specific detector operating frequency. The BigFoot is tuned for 3 kHz and 15 kHz especially for the MXT/DFX series. My BigFoot works well enough in V3i 2.5 kHz and 7.5 kHz single frequency modes. However, in 22.5 kHz single frequency mode or in three frequency mode the target id (VDI) numbers all skew very high (they tripled on the last V3i that I had). This more or less limited the BigFoot to being used only in 7.5 kHz mode on the V3i where I would generally prefer to use 22.5 kHz single frequency mode. The coil runs just fine on the DFX in 15 kHz mode so after lots of back and forth I finally settled on the DFX. The DFX has weaknesses however. The DFX always transmits a combined dual frequency waveform. When single frequency mode is chosen, the machine still transmits the same waveform optimized for dual frequency use, but simply ignores half the return signal to process either the 3 kHz portion or the 15 kHz portion. The transmit waveform is not optimized for single frequency and so some punch is lost compared to a dedicated single frequency machine like the MXT. The V3i in single frequency mode actually modifies the transmit waveform for use at the single frequency. It is still not quite as efficient as a dedicated single frequency detector, but a big improvement over the DFX way of doing things. The V3i also adds transmit boost capability, that can bring bit that last little bit of lost performance as compared to a dedicated single frequency detector. The lost efficiency shows up more as shorter battery life than actual lost performance. Second, the DFX while in multi frequency mode is always locked into "Salt Mode" for saltwater beach operation, effectively tuning out the salt range. This unfortunately means that small gold capability is degraded in DFX dual frequency mode. The V3i allows the salt mode operation to be deactivated while in multi frequency mode, allowing for better small gold performance while in MF mode. The closest the DFX can get is to run in a single frequency mode, which turns off the dual frequency salt compensation. But now you are back to running a less optimized single frequency mode as compared to the V3i in single frequency mode. Long story short there are too many benefits and neat features on the V3i that I have been denying myself due to my desire for BigFoot compatibility. The fact is I normally run the BigFoot in 15 kHz single frequency mode on my DFX for a little extra gold hots. However, after some though I have decided the V3i running at an optimized 7.5 kHz is likely just as good if not better than the DFX running a "soft" 15 kHz. So I did talk myself into a new V3i recently. In theory the V3i at 22.5 kHz should be a decent nugget detector, but you rarely hear of it being used as such. Part of that is a ground balance issue. The DFX and V3i tracking systems really are not up to working that well in heavily mineralized ground. The DFX does offer a normal manual ground balance mode with both a coarse and fine adjust, although you have to dive into the menu to access it - not so handy for making constant tweaks. The V3i actually has no true Manual ground balance mode. The best you can do is track and lock, as on the MXT. However, the V3i "Live Controls" can be set up to give the operator direct access to a ground balance offset that can tweak the "locked" setting up or down. That may actually be easier to access and use than the DFX version of manual ground balance but I need to play around more to find out for sure.
  6. Finds first for the TLDR people. As the finds in my current primary patch dwindle in numbers from being worked heavily the past two years, I'm scouting for a new primary patch to begin working. Using the criteria and method outlined in a previous post, I've located a very good location that is certain to hold gold, silver, and more. Today will be my first time boots on the ground at that location and I'll walk the reader through it along with my scouting method. Maybe it will help someone and provide insight or encouragement. Here is the sat. view 5 playgrounds, one skate park, basketball, tennis, two soccer fields, two softball fields, two shelters, one former 1890's to 1950's church location on site. Here are my paths while scouting. Deus in red, V3i in green. So, from the sat. images there are many hot-spots to strike, and I won't try to get them all as this is a long term prospect, and I only desire to determine 3 primary things today. 1. Pressure - hunting pressure from other detectorists. 2. Trash composition and density. 3. Presence - Is there jewelry where I expect it to be. Deus gets the top spot today as it's the ideal scouting unit. Light, fast, great tones to read the trash. From the parking lot I begin and move to the skate park since it's close and can hold silver and junk jewelry along with lots of coins. Foil seems to be the primary trash along the way, and around the skate feature the aluminum kicks in - light can slaw and tabs primarily. I can hear lots and lots of coins, zinc and copper cents mostly, but a healthy quantity of dimes as well. I select a few targets I know are quarters and pennies, then intentionally sample some of the larger better sounding trash before moving on. The primary traffic flow from one side of the park to another is divided by a slight drainage ditch with the easiest pass being on either end... and people naturally take the easiest route, so I do too. Pennies everywhere! Zinc mostly, healthy dose of copper, decent selection of dimes, quite a few quarters...light trash mostly foil and ferrous bits... but I keep on moving through without digging a single target. Not interested today. Moving to the goal at the primary soccer field I work my way over to the nearest corner, then down the sideline to mid-field before cutting over to the center. Then I work my way to the opposite goal before coming around the back net. From there, and because of its close proximity to the goal, I briefly enter the playground before hitting the nearest corner of the soccer field diagonally opposite from the first corner I hit. Quarters everywhere! I decide to spend some time here sampling, cherry picking the best sounds. Within 10 minutes I found the heart pendant necklace. Jewelry confirmed, nice. So I pause, crank up the notch to 93 and take all the quarters before moving on. Erasing the notch I notice an area of the playground is different. Something was removed and not replaced. I suspect one of the super dangerous merry-go-rounds that children today get no experience or joy from used to be there. Clad everywhere....move on. Swing-set looks vintage so I check that and the mostly abandoned softball backstop area nearby. The trash picks up and bottle caps start to appear below the coil. I dug a first (for this park) beavertail ring pull, nice...a sign there might be some silver coins lurking around here. I'm getting hot by now so start thinking of shade and where to find some. It's scarce, so good places to concentrate. I mentally discriminate everything but quarters. Lots of nice signals, lots of trash and rusty caps. So far this is the trashiest area and I'm impressed it's not worse. Out of water and thirsty, I head back to the parking lot where I started, taking any quarters I come across. There are so many coins around it's obvious to me this park has never been heavily worked over by much of anyone in a long time, if ever. This place is a clad mine. Exactly how my current patch started out! I switch out units for the V3i and head towards the nearby secondary soccer field goal. I work one small corner of the goal net taking everything in a 6 foot diameter...clad and tabs mostly. Then I work right down the field towards the only clump of trees between the two fields and casually work the area randomly, still cherry picking signals but expanding the range down below zinc cents a little plus taking all nickel range targets as I find them. Getting tired and hot I'm thinking of wrapping it up so I head out to the sideline and try to find the trash zone where people sit and spectate. There isn't much trash to detect so I decide to just pick a line inside the playing field and take everything not obviously trash out of the ground. As I reached the corner of the field the silver ring shows up. Someone threw the ball into play and lost a ring perhaps. Now we're talking! Satisfied with the mission I walked off and swung over the curb area near the parking lot to get a feel for the trash there, too. With light to moderate trash, tons of clad signals, two pieces of jewelry - I have all the intel I need to know that this park is going to produce a few gold items, eventually. I'm hesitant to give 5 stars so we'll rate it at a 4 plus star park, IMO. Next hunt the tedious process of clad layer removal begins, oh, joy. Thanks for your time. Good hunting.
  7. I just purchased a brand White's V3i from the factory as noted on another thread. The brand new machine much to my surprise comes with new new redesign of the White's D2 10" round DD coil. I say surprise because I ordered a scuff cover for the coil, and although it went on the scuff cover is larger than the new coil, especially along the inner edge of the right side and so there are large gaps between the edges of the coil and the scuff cover. The new coil has been shaved here and there for a thinner more modern appearance versus the older squared off look. I looked and have seen no change in the part number on any sites nor any mention of this new coil anywhere. White's needs to make this known and hopefully a properly fitted scuff cover is available or in the works. It could be it just happened and I am one of the first with this coil and so jumped the gun a bit while dealers clear old stock. The old D2 coil has been quoted at 17.9 oz or 498 grams which I have to question as my new coil weighs 18.8 oz or 532 grams on my postal scale. Can anyone get get an accurate weight on the old D2 coil? Include the cable as I have done - I hate it when cable weights are excluded, as if we are going to swing the coil without a cable. That may account for the discrepancy as I find it hard to believe the new coil weighs more than the old coil, unless the internal windings are different/heavier. This coil is also compatible with the White's VX3, all versions of the MXT, the MX5, M6, and DFX.
  8. Back in 2014 I got a smoking deal on a like new used White's V3i with over a year of remaining warranty. It was my third after the original Vision and then later a V3i. I quickly found a platinum ring that almost paid for what I had into it, but unfortunately I got busy on other things and when the warranty was about up I sold it. Well, I have regretted it ever since. The V3i is a unique detector that represents the end result of a design philosophy that I do not think we will see exceeded. You have programmable access to nearly every function that exists in a metal detector along with amazing control over the audio and visual interface. The bright, sharp, colorful screen has never been done better on any other model in the ensuing years. Owning the V3i is very much like owning a "design your own detector kit". I am very much not a person to have nostalgic feelings about metal detectors or to ever hang on to any very long. However, the V3i is in a class of its own in many ways and I decided if there was ever a detector I should just buy and keep it is the V3i. That being the case I decided to get a brand new one from the factory. I may very well end up using this detector to shoot a series of instructional videos about general metal detecting theory and technique. The functions and colorful screen can be used to well illustrate almost anything I can think of when it comes to metal detectors and how they work. Don't be holding your breath however - me getting around to doing some things like finishing the ATX Strip and Rebuild can sometimes take years! I finally had reason to drive west to visit family recently, and made a swing by White's a part of that drive. I contacted forum member Tom Boykin (tboykin) who works at White's to set up a good time for a meet and greet. And so it was I found myself heading for Sweet Home, Oregon! Click on photos for larger versions. Aerial view of White's facility.... White's sits across a bridge from the main of Sweet Home right on the banks for the beautiful South Santiam River.... Cross over the bridge and turn left and there is the sign... First thing you see entering the main office building is a little detector showroom... but the main attraction is a large display of old White's detectors and items found with them.... Here is the old BFO Nugget Master with dual meters. Ken White Sr. loved huge boxes, lots of knobs, and big or even multiple meters - I doubt ergonomic was even in his vocabulary! The big boxes were often empty with a little circuit board tucked in a corner. Next to the Nugget Master is an original type blue box Gold Master, part of the old T/R series. These are just collectors items folks so don't be tempted to buy one thinking you are getting a decent nugget detector - only the black box versions can be considered as modern detectors. The old blue box versions don't even ground balance. And a real sweetie, the Treasure Master! Anyway, I was running a tight schedule, arriving at Sweet Home at 11AM and heading on to Reno around 2:30 getting home near midnight. Tom was gracious enough to give me a tour of the facilities where I met faces both new and old, and he bought lunch to top it all off. Then I picked up my brand new V3i (which I really am going to keep) and hit the road for Reno. Tom is an engaging young man with infectious enthusiasm and we are lucky to have him on the forum. He is still relatively new to detecting so go easy on him. The fact is though it will be people like Tom that take metal detecting to the next generation. Thanks for the tour Tom! For those who have not been so lucky check out the White's Electronics Factory Tour Video. And finally, here is my new baby still waiting to make its first find...
  9. Very good post by Mike Hillis at Findmall on V3i filtering options and how they affect performance. Older designs often refer to having "two filter" or "four filter" methods. Here is a post by Monte that discusses that subject. And finally a technical discussion by Dave Johnson for those wanting to head deeper into the rabbit hole. See also "Ground Filtering" in the DFX Engineering Report by Mark Rowan.
  10. MX Sport And V3i

    With the versatility of the V3i I was wondering what settings I would have to make to set it up to emulate the MX Sport.... There are settings for the V3i to emulate the MXT, I have used them out of curiosity and found they work pretty well but my mode of choice is still stereo mixed mode.
  11. Recently bought a used V3i from a hunting buddy. He bought the V3 new and later updated to the V3i version. The machine is fairly clean and the 10" D2 appears to never been used. He bought two SEF 10 x 12" coils, one white and one black. I was very concerned about the lack of air test distances, but with a few reductions in settings the coils will be sufficient for while as long as I don't run multi-frequency and keep the tx boost off. Did the simple test to see if they were V rated and all failed and one will not ground balance while in multi-frequency. All this makes sense since he originally bought a V3 detector. Now I understand why he bought the SEF coils (he thought they would add depth). I originally bought the machine for only gold/jewelry hunting with the 22.5 frequency which will require a V coil if I run with high sensitivity settings.
  12. What could a person expect to be the normal air test on a dime and nickel using the stock coin/jewelry program with the v3i and the stock 11" D2 coil? Thanks in advance
  13. Ultimate White's V3i Info Page

    Mike posted this White's V3i link on another forum and it is a great one so I thought it worth posting here also http://www.metaldetectingintheusa.com/whites-v3i-metal-detector.html
  14. This used to be a deep, dark secret although the process was leaked and posted on various websites. It was kept secret because this process gives you access to the factory calibration process, and if you mess with the calibration your detector may need to go back to the factory. Do Not Do It - STAY OUT OF THE CALIBRATIONS SETTINGS! However, a Master reset can put you back to the way the setting were the day you got the detector, and cure various oddball problems that may arise. A good idea for a used machine you have purchased in particular.
  15. I am looking for as much practical and technical info on the V3i's prospecting mode as possible. It is an area that is extremely lacking. I don't have much nugget shooting experience but I'm hoping to remedy that situation in the near future. I have done some with my MXT but I want to explore the potential of the V3i. If any of the White's tech info is available that would be great too. Thank's...
  16. V3i Poor Performance

    Let me start by saying I own 3 White's machines. I have had the V3i since 2010 with the 10" DD coil the 6x9 and the 4X6. It never has been a great depth machine for me, but I usually run the stock programs C&J usually I recently sent it to the White's factory for a tune up after poor air testing 6" on a Quarter and I was sure something was fishy. I got it back yesterday and the said two of the 3 coils were out of spec and they replaced them. They told me the coils are still good for use on the DFX, MXT but not the V3i. They also replaced 2 ribbon cables and the screen plastic total reset and calibration.Total cost with return shipping $252. and change, It was very reasonable. The only problem is it didn't change a thing , still poor depth performance in the air and on the ground. No target separation whatsoever, just total masking. I have a test garden and it only sees the quarter barely at 6". My Tesoro Outlaw finds everything in the garden no problem with the 8" coil. When I run custom programs from Magic and Fox it gets slightly better but not consistent. So it's up on Craigslist as I am no longer investing any more time and resources into it. White's service was great and the costs were minimal for the service rendered no issues with that. My other two White's machine are great!
  17. Does anyone know if the White's multi frequency vlf detectors such as the VX3 and the V3i search coils have just one coil for the transmit and one coil for the receive or are there separate sets of transmit and receive coils in the coil housing for each frequency? thanks
  18. I have put up info pages on the White's V3i at White's V3i Details & Review Page and XP DEUS V4 at XP DEUS V4 Details & Review Page
  19. Hi Y'all. I've been all over the map as far which detector I think I'm going to buy. Right now I think it's either going to be the CTX3030 or White's V3i. I got some questions. How does the Minelab's auto ground balance technology compare to White's auto ground balance technology? In particular, in terms of ground balancing, how does the CTX 3030 compare to White's V3i? How do the discrimination abilities of the CTX3030 and V3i compare? White's user manuals are written much better than Minelab's user manuals. How much do you agree with this statement? Minelab claims, "FBS (Full Band Spectrum) simultaneously transmits, receives and analyses a full band of multiple frequencies." Whiteselectronics claims, "... digital waveforms also produce unde- sired harmonic frequencies. Lots and lots of harmonic frequencies, 10’s or even 100’s of them. These harmonics have no useful energy and are not part of the signal processing. So while we can claim to transmit many, many frequencies, we cannot claim to process or use them. Therefore, we could easily claim the Spectra V3i transmits 17 frequencies, or 28, or 39, or 55—we could get plain silly with this. And such a claim would be true, technically speaking, but since all those extra frequencies are not actually used, it would be misleading to make such a claim. White’s chooses, instead, to claim the number of frequencies we are actually using and processing. It may not sound as impressive as a 55-frequency detector, but it’s honest and accurate. " So, either Minelab's claim is false, or White's multifrequency technology is not as sophisticated as Minelab's, which is it? Or I'm misinterpreting something. - Nugz
  20. Hi Steve, I'm down here in Oz and was considering considering an MXT Pro. Would I be better off going to the V3i? Best regards....Robin
  21. Snow on the ground so time for a little bench testing. Fisher F75 SE version 7.0A (2013) with 5" round DD coil, Nokta FORS Gold with 5" semi-round DD coil, and White's V3i with 4" x 6" DD coil. The table shows VDI numbers on some standard items. The little allen wrench is like a small nail - a ferrous item. The BIC ballpoint is my standard simulated small nugget. The ring is my 14K plain gold band, around 7 grams. The VDI range on the Nokta runs from 1 - 99 with 40 and under generally ferrous. The F75 runs from 1 - 99 with 15 and under generally ferrous. The White's V3i runs from -95 to +95 with negative numbers generally ferrous. I say generally because in all three cases gold can run well into the ferrous range. Like by 10 - 20 VDI numbers into it! A few big lessons. The Nokta FORS VDI 1 - 99 range is skewed with high conductors bunched on the high end of the scale with most of the scale devoted to ferrous and low conductive items. This is ideal for relic hunters and prospectors. Silver coin hunters however usually prefer the scale to devote more room on the high end to possibly get a better handle on what is silver and what is not. The ferrous range of the Nokta actually runs all the way down into the ferrous ground range itself which is why there are 40 numbers devoted to it. The ID Mask setting defaults to 10 and if set lower allows ground signals to sound off. Since non-ferrous starts at 40 and I arbitrarily end low conductors at zinc penny on the upper end you have 40 - 82 or a spread of 42 points for low conductors. This really is no more than an average spread due to the large ferrous range. What I was happy to see is the simulated nugget (BIC ballpoint) nailing at 44 as a non-ferrous target. Contrast this to the F75 1 - 99 range. There are only 15 points in the ferrous range with the extreme low end represented on the Nokta scale truncated roughly in the middle. However, this leaves 16 up to 62 at zinc penny for a low conductor spread of 46 or slightly better than that on the Nokta FORS and leaves room for a little better definition for high conductive coins also. There is a ten point VDI spread between a dime and a quarter versus only 3 points on the Nokta. What disturbs me on this particular F75 is that having tried multiple coils I am getting the same result on the simulated nugget test. It wants to nail at a solid 1 which is well under the ferrous 8 reading for the allen wrench. This is not shocking but it is not good either. I can get the ballpoint to break in at 16 occasionally but it should be there hard and solid, not rarely. I had Keith Southern test his updated F75 and it seems to do better. I need to test this again when and if I ever get an upgraded F75 but it does confirm my suspicion that at least some Fisher units are not properly aligned at this critical break point. The White's V3i slays both of them with White's standard spread of 190 VDI points with half that devoted to ground and ferrous. A full 95 points is devoted to non-ferrous, giving a nice spread across the whole range. The V3i is a three frequency unit and the 22.5 kHz frequency employed allows it to easily nail the ballpoint test with a solid VDI of 3. White's even allows the 22.5 kHz frequency to use a native VDI range that skews and expands the low conductive range that delivers a VDI of 10 on the ballpoint, a very nice cushion between it and a ferrous reading. you have from 1 all the way up to 55 for zinc penny slightly beating both the Nokta and F75 for VDI resolution on low conductors and still room left for very good definition in the high conductor range. These detectors can employ a dual tone mode that delivers a low tone on ferrous targets and a higher tone on non-ferrous targets. The break point on the Nokta and F75 is preset at the factory VDI breaks of 13 and 40. The V3i you can customize not only the VDI break point but the tones. The F75 dual tone mode is pretty straight forward, with the volume being weaker or louder depending on the strength of the signal. In other words, a modulated audio. The Nokta Boost or DI2 mode uses a VCO (voltage controlled oscillator) audio where both volume and tone increases with signal strength. Anyone that uses a Fisher Gold Bug is familiar with VCO audio. It is rather unique and some people like it, others do not. Again, the V3i allows the tones to be customized any way you want, with either VCO, modulated, or even unmodulated options. Things get more interesting in Nokta DI3 or F75 three tone options. The low tone break for ferrous is the same but a third higher tone is added. On the Nokta zinc pennies and higher or from 80 on up delivers the third high tone. On the F75 it breaks above zinc penny so those pennies fall into the middle tone low conductive range. Zinc penny is also where Indian head pennies and some other old coins can fall. If you hunt strictly by ear and dig high tones only you are going to pretty much dig all coins but nickels. With the F75 it is geared more towards silver hunters so zinc pennies, Indian heads and possibly other coins would get passed up as low conductors. But wait! The F75 also has a four tone option that puts that zinc range into into own fourth tone - problem fixed. You can chose a tone option that focuses more on silver only or one that breaks out that penny range. Jewelry Hunter would probably prefer the 3 tone mode and dig just mid-tones. The bottom line is the Fisher has more tone options for the coin hunters than what the FORS offers. Of note is that the Nokta DI2 dual tone mode uses VCO audio, but the DI3 three tone option defaults to a more normal modulated audio. DI3 favors a faster sweep speed than DI2 which benefits from going slower. A generality would be that DI2 is more powerful but DI3 better behaved. The V3i again is unchallenged. You can actually go so far as to independently set a separate tone for every single VDI number, and the tones can be any from 191 tone options. You can make low conductors high tone if you want. Absolutely nothing on the market compares to the V3i for audio and visual customization options. Well, this all seems pretty easy, right? Just get the V3i and get on with business. Sadly, these are air tests. You might ask, for instance, which detector did best for "depth" in these air tests, as if there actually is such a thing. I only pay passing attention to that but the F75 seemed to be doing very well in that regard. Here is the problem with this entire lesson and all my typing. When you put things in the ground all these nice air tests rapidly decay and fall apart. In very mild ground or on very shallow targets detectors can be amazing. In my ground unfortunately VDI numbers start breaking down at around 3-4 inches! What you discover is that if you get too focused on cherry picking VDI numbers good finds deplete rapidly. Almost all accessible public areas have been detected for decades. So the easy accurate VDI results have already all been cherry picked away. The best finds these days often come from digging targets that were passed up precisely because they did not give a perfect response. In my opinion, these days we have to cast a wider net and be willing to dig more trash to make those exceptional finds. What that means is huge numbers of VDI numbers and tones although flashy and fun often is no better than just using a simple two or three tone method and going for it. Styles differ vastly and because really this is about enjoying ourselves there is no right or wrong way to do things - as long as you are enjoying yourself. For me, something simple like the Nokta DI3 tone option for digging all high conductor possible coin signals actually works pretty well in actual practice. If I want coins except nickels just dig high tones and have fun. The F75 allows a special mode that kicks nickels into the high tone range so you can do the same thing and get the nickels also if you choose. The V3i by now you should know the story - set it up any way you want. Still, tests like these are very valuable to me in setting the baseline for performance in the field from which I can work to discover how much things vary and hopefully why. The theoretical goal if finding a machine that adheres as closely to bench testing results as possible in the field. Sometimes you get textbook results, but then at another location everything goes haywire. But unless you know where you are starting from you will have no idea what is going on. I will sum this up for now by saying that the Nokta FORS is a machine that appeals to simplicity and leans towards relic hinting and prospecting. That is not to say you can't do well coin detecting with it, it is just that it is not set up with coin detecting specifically in mind. The F75 nicely straddles the middle for all detecting purposes. The V3i is in theory the perfect detector but the reality is huge numbers of people have discovered more options does not always mean better detecting, and it is not unusual at all for people to abandon the V3i in favor of simpler machines. Unless you spend a vast amount of time with a V3i it is hard to feel like you have mastered the machine. The V3i appeals to my inner detector nerd but it is usually the case where in the field I prefer simpler machines myself. Still, I made the V3i part of all this just to see how it really does do if given a fair chance and at least when bench testing it is impressive to see all the bells and whistles in action. This is all just stuff I am finding out for myself. I have no real reason in reporting it to you other than just to be sharing some info that is taking at least a little effort to collect. It helps me digest it better trying to put it clearly in a form you can better understand. Hopefully it will help someone in their own choice in a detector. As you may be figuring out if you have not already, there are no best VLF detectors, just lots of really different VLF detectors. They all actually do a good job finding stuff but it is in how they go about it that differs so much. It is mostly a case of finding out what style and type of detector works best for you.
  22. This should be interesting. The reality these days is that when it comes to nugget detecting I am very much a pulse induction kind of guy. I also go out of my way to point out the problems with using VLF detectors and discrimination while nugget detecting. Yet at the same time I have very much been a proponent of using VLF detectors and discrimination where it may offer some sort of advantage. Ganes Creek, Alaska was the best example of a location with large nuggets and tons of ferrous junk to contend with. A good discriminating VLF detector made sense there and the vast majority of the gold found at Ganes Creek was found with VLF detectors. I am seeing similar situations here down south, especially in California. Places where 150 years of mining has left ferrous trash galore. What I am looking for is a way to narrow things down a bit in some situations. The idea in some places with unknown potential is to scout first with the VLF, and then, if any gold is found, to switch to a PI and hammer the spot. There are the big cobble piles, that may have a big cobble shot full of gold, but which are more likely to contain a rusted can. A big coil on a VLF could be handy for scouting those. Finally, I want to do some honest blue sky prospecting where I put myself in gold country but not specifically on a proven location and go looking for a patch. A lot of this would be in logging country and steel wire and other ferrous trash can be common. I can deal with the bullets but may want to weed out the ferrous. I ended up by chance with a Nokta FORS Gold that came with a 13.5" x 15.5" DD coil. This machine has a great two tone mode where all targets signal, but ferrous with a low tone, and non-ferrous with a high tone. My preferred mode for scouting trashy terrain. I hear all targets so nothing gets passed without thought. I may investigate some ferrous signals further if I am suspicious. I have a new Fisher F75SE coming, a model without the latest updates. I may end up also with an updated version but got tired of waiting on that so bought this one to use for now. It also gives me a baseline to compare to should I ever lay hands on a newer unit. Or one I can upgrade later if I wish. To compare apples and apples I have a new DeTech 12" x 15" DD coil on the way for the F75 to use versus the Nokta with similar coil. I have a friend who did very well at Ganes Creek in the 22.5 kHz dedicated frequency prospecting mode, and his main claim was that it had killer discrimination. So just to make life interesting I have another DeTech 12" x 15" DD coil on the way to use on the V3i versus the other two detectors. Finally, I will toss my CTX 3030 with 13" x 17" coil in on this little competition though it is a slightly different coil. Close enough though and should be interesting. There is already a huge thread going on the CTX and gold at http://www.detectorprospector.com/forum/topic/361-minelab-ctx-3030-for-gold-nuggets/ I honestly look at this as more a shootout between the F75 and the Nokta more because I see them more as get down and play in the mud prospecting detectors. The CTX and V3i are more my in town units. But maybe that is just a perception thing on my part and since I own both anyway - why not? Looked at another way these do represent some company flagship units, say what else you may about them. Maybe there will be surprises and no matter what, I have a lot to learn here. And that, my friends, I do enjoy! OK, now the bad news. I am not much for contrived testing so I will need favorable weather to get these detectors out of town into real field conditions to give this all a try. And I do not want to rush to judgement in any case. Eventually it will all sort out and I will report along the way if anything of interest develops. Until then, you will have to be patient. Again, lest anyone think I am believing this all to be some kind of magic gold getting idea, it is not at all. I will be using a PI detector for most of my nugget detecting in 2015 and basically digging everything I come across. This is actually part of my weeding down detectors process with the main goal being to let either the F75 or FORS Gold go away. I have other reasons for keeping the CTX and V3i so they are just going along for the ride and the potential for extra knowledge. When I go out this summer I want to be packing both a PI and a VLF. The intent is to use the PI and have the VLF more for backup or for getting into a real trashy location. This shootout will determine just what VLF gets to go with me this summer. The photo below shows all four coils side by side with weights as weighed on my postal scale with scuff covers. The dimensions are width by length at longest point with the third dimension being the length of the actual middle DD overlap working area. The two DeTech coils are 12.75" in this regard versus 14.25" for the Nokta and 15.5" for the CTX 3030. This would be the nominal length to shoot for on each coil sweep if you figure no overlap (which would not be wise). The Nokta is the lightest coil so in theory combining weight with area covered it has the best overall specs as regards area covered for weight handled. The angle of the picture and coil placing tends to make the Nokta coil look smaller than the DeTech coils but it is in fact slightly larger. Last funny note. I would normally complain about putting coils this size on VLF detectors because in the past it made them nose heavy and had me whining about the weight. However, world class lead weight PI detectors have made it so I have gotten used to using machines far heavier than these beasts, even with their larger coils. Go figure.
  23. just wondering if you are close to posting up a review. (I have read what you wrote so far)
  24. Here are three detectors that offer three different ways to do multi-frequency. First up, the detector on the right, the XP DEUS. This detector allows you to choose from one of four different frequencies, and run any single one at a time. You can choose from 4, 8, 12, or 18 kHz. Second, we have the detector on the far left, the Minelab CTX 3030. This detector looks at a range of frequencies and analyzes several at once. Transmitted frequencies is a bit of marketing magic; all that matters is what a detector processes. The CTX 3030 processes two or three frequencies simultaneously, comparing the results with advanced algorithms to deliver target information. There is no option to process single frequencies. Finally, the detector in the middle, the White's V3i. This detector employs three frequencies, and is unique in that it can process and compare results from all three simultaneously, or run any one single frequency. The choices are 2.5, 7.5, and 22.5 kHz. In a nutshell low frequencies are less reactive to ground minerals and produce cleaner signals on coin size high conductive targets. Low frequencies also better discern ferrous from non-ferrous items. High frequencies are more reactive to ground mineralization and have more issues identifying ferrous trash, but respond better to small low conductive items. Frequencies under 10 kHz tend to be "coin frequencies", 10 kHz to 15 kHz is a good "all around frequency range", and over 15 kHz tends to be the realm of prospecting detectors, though higher frequencies are seeing more use now with others attempting to pull small non-ferrous items out of ferrous trash. European hunters looking for small coins and relic hunters looking for bullets and other items are leaning higher frequency these days. Usually choosing a single frequency will deliver the most power and depth. That is why you do not see multi-frequency nugget detectors, and why out of the three detectors discussed here the Deus with its 18 kHz mode and V3i with its 22.5 kHz mode offer better potential as prospecting units than the CTX 3030. Detectors that process multiple frequencies have a clear edge when running on mineralized salt water beaches. A single frequency can handle the mineralization, or the salt effect, but not both at once. Multi-frequency detectors are the preferred solution for salt water beach applications (not counting PI detectors), and so the CTX 3030 and V3i have a clear edge over the Deus in this regard. Multiple frequency analysis can offer superb discrimination capabilities. When people talk about depth on multi-frequency detectors what they are really talking about is accurate target identification at depth. Many detectors will detect deeper than the multi-frequency units, but not while delivering accurate target id results. The Minelab Explorers and CTX are generally acknowledged as being on the forefront in this regard, no doubt due to the highly secret algorithms they employ to deliver target id results. Anyway, the three detectors here have three different ways of handling the options. In theory the V3i offers the best of both worlds - the ability to run any one frequency or three at once. In practice the V3i is so complex few people ever fully master its capabilities but I do think they have the right idea. A much requested idea for the XP Deus, which is updateable via software, is the ability to run multiple frequencies. On salt water beaches at least this offers an indisputable advantage. Presumably an update to the CTX could offer the ability to run a single frequency, but so far Minelab has shown no interest in such options. It does appear that is where we are heading though - detectors that through proper design and software can become most anything the operator desires.
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