Clay Diggins

Meteor Crater In 3D

2 posts in this topic

Made another 3D map, this time it's Barringer (Meteor) Crater in Northern Arizona.

This is a small map, if you would like better resolution I have it but it will be a slow load on most connections.

You can move around in the 3D environment with your mouse. Pan, Zoom and get Information from the features. Try typing in an "r" and watch the mountain spin in 3D. Type an "L" to turn on or off the labels. The "I" in the lower left corner will show you more options.

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's super cool, this resolution was instant fast on my cable (Comcast) connection and iPad and easy to navigate around, thank you.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now

  • Similar Content

    • By Clay Diggins
      I've made an interactive 3D map of the Hoffman mining lease in Fairplay Colorado. There are two versions of the map A very LARGE one that runs about 30 Mb download and a much smaller one that's about 3.5 Mb.

      LARGE 3D Map

      small 3D Map

      The Hoffman lease is called the Katuska pit.
      It's about 8 acres of private property.
      It has been permitted as a sand and gravel operation by the State of Colorado since 1991

      While you are viewing the map click on the "mine" area outlined in red. A window will pop up with links to information about the geology of the placers from the Land Matters Library and a link to the sand and gravel permit report from the State of Colorado.

      Use your mouse to move around the map. Scroll to move in and out or get dizzy by typing an "r" to make the map spin.
    • By Steve Herschbach
      A topic got brought up at http://www.detectorprospector.com/forum/topic/1510-awesome-day-in-the-desert-sw/?p=17706 which is so important I wanted to cover it in detail on it's own thread.
      There is a feature in digital photography whereby information about the photo can be encoded directly into the photo itself. This originally was just information about the photo itself including the original file name and camera setting information, date taken, etc. There are two common formats you are likely to run into - EXIF and IPTC. EXIF tends to be technical details about the photo, and IPTC is more about copyright, description, and other details useful for publishing. Details on EXIF and IPTC here.
      When cameras equipped with GPS became a possibility, GPS information was added to the EXIF data. This was normally just something common to phones with GPS built in but more cameras are now coming with GPS built in and more GPS units are coming with cameras built in. Activities like geotagging and such make tying location data to a photo very popular. All those photos loaded up for viewing in Google Earth? Way easier if the location data is encoded into the photo.
      I use a great little free program called IrfanView which is amazingly powerful and compact. The IrfanView portable version can run off a USB stick. IrfanView has a photo information tab under Image in the menu which reveals all the EXIF and IPTC information, and allows the IPTC information to be modified. You can also set options for stripping EXIF data, both on image save or via batch processing. Like I said, very powerful little program.
      When you display the EXIF information in IrfanView, it offers to display the photo location in Google Maps, Google Earth, and some other mapping programs. Great for photos you took but can't remember where.
      OK, here is a photo I took on my phone, cropped, resized, modified the brightness, and added a caption. I saved as a renamed jpg but did not toggle the checkbox that strips EXIF data. I want to show that just because an image has been modified does not mean that data gets changed. Here is the image, and then a shot from IrfanView showing the EXIF data....


      Now, you could save my lake image to your computer, and open it in IrfanView and view the EXIF data, but there is an easier way. Depending on your browser you need to get the address of the first photo I posted. If you use Chrome, just right click on the photo, and choose copy image address. Or you may have to click on the photo, choose the Save option, and copy the address out of the browser window. Bottom line depending on the browser you need to get the address where the image resides online. In this case the address for the lake image is http://www.detectorprospector.com/forum/uploads/monthly_01_2016/post-1-0-57762000-1451694506.jpg
      If you have copied that address (again, easy way is with Chrome) now go to this website http://www.verexif.com/en/ and where it says Or paste a picture URL paste in the address of the photo and hit return. A page will pop up with the basic EXIF information, and you will see a map at the bottom of the page showing you where I took that photo!!!!
      Notice the site has an option for stripping EXIF information from your own photos.
      It gets better. If you have an iPhone or similarly equipped device it even knows the direction you are pointing the camera, and this data is also encoded. If you did download my photo and open it in IrfanView you can load the location directly to Google Earth and see where I was and which direction I was pointing the camera. In Google Earth below as loaded from IrfanView the view was looking straight to the top of the screen capture which is rather obvious since I was taking a photo of the lake. The funny part is I named the photo "looking west" and now that I see where I was and the direction of photo it was looking east.

      OK, lessons learned. First, just use a camera without GPS, which is what I normally do. If you use a phone or other GPS enabled device, learn where to shut the EXIF GPS recording off or just turn off the GPS when taking photos. Even then I would use IrfanView to make sure you did it right. Possibly the most dangerous thing is uploading directly from a phone as it is too easy to forget and load up location data without thinking about it.
      Many sites like this one resize large images and EXIF information may get stripped in the process. In fact it is easier to lose the information than retain it if you do much with the image. It is not always bad stuff to have and keeping it can be a good thing - I purposefully use EXIF and IPTC information to help insure that people copying my photos without permission might be caught using the encoded data. It really is only the GPS location data that can be a problem given the nature of prospecting. But never count on the data getting stripped by a website, be sure it is not there in the first place if you do not wish it to be.
      We all really like photos, myself in particular, which is why I set this forum up with generous photo display options. I sure do not want to discourage people from posting photos - I want to encourage it. But do be careful when posting photos from a GPS enabled device to be sure you are not posting more information than you intended.
    • By RSMGCOLORADO
      Are there maps of current active mining claims in Colorado that is updated and available to view????
    • By Clay Diggins
      I've been working on a 3D mapping system. I've put together a sample map of Rich Hill, Arizona with some mine information.

      There is a bunch of stuff these maps can do but I'm not sure if they will work on enough peoples browsers to make it worthwhile to pursue development of this system.

      Please give it a try and tell me what you think. (Caution - this is about a 7 megabyte map and may take a while to load if you are on a slow connection)
      3D map HERE.

      You can move around in the 3D environment with your mouse. Pan, Zoom and get Information from the mines. Try typing in an "r" and watch the mountain spin in 3D. Type an "l" to turn on or off the mine labels. It's a lot of fun and could be a cool feature for researchers if it works for enough people.

      This map is smoking fast on my development machine using the latest Firefox browser but doesn't work at all on my Safari browser. It works in Edge, Internet Explorer and Firefox on my Windows 10 computer but it's clunky. It doesn't work very well on my Windows XP machine in the latest Firefox.

      Give it a try and let me know if you like it or hate it. If it's working well for you might consider going to a bigger map version for more fun.
    • By Steve Herschbach
      The first of a series of articles I am doing about the GPS system that comes with the Minelab CTX 3030 and GPZ 7000 has been posted on Minelab's Treasure Talk site

    • By Steve Herschbach
      Just published at Minelab's Treasure Talk blog at http://www.minelab.com/usa/go-minelabbing/treasure-talk/gps-mapping-with-the-minelab-ctx-and-gpz-detectors-part-2