Steve Herschbach

We Have Gone Backwards On Detection Depth Since 1973

21 posts in this topic

I was looking at some old metal detector catalogs and got a chuckle out of these charts from the 1973 Garrett catalog. People get up in arms about advertising claims these days but get a look at these. To their credit they say "large metal objects" and do not define what that is (dump truck?) but we are talking 1973 BFO detectors here. I need to ditch my new detectors and get one of those old machines! Unfortunately depths were measured in inches then, not feet, on normal targets.

The irony is the page is addressing "misleading advertising".

garrett-bfo-metal-detector-coil-depth-comparison-chart-1973.jpg

garrett-metal-detector-depth-illustration-1973.jpg

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Crikey much more then 40% deeper than a Z. Eat your heart out ML.

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I had one of those Garretts, back then I was more gullible and believed a lot of the advertising. About 4" on a coin if I remember correctly. Someone told me the word "gullible" wasn't in the dictionary and I believed him.LOL

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hype ain't new...for years every new model from Garrett (to name one) was touted to go 20% deeper than the previous model...I think they were correct if all you wanted to find was iron...

fred

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i dontl like anything keene green" or anything  "Garrett gimmick"......the ad doesnt suprise me in the least bit.

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Back when D Tex said their detector could detect a dollar bill because the ink having metal in it.

At that time I was swinging a White's BFO detector.

Chuck

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16ft. Crikey!!  

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16 feet deep!!!  If I was reading these adds back in the day I would be asking the dealer what sized excavator they were throwing in with the 24" coil. 

Like the teaser of a title you gave to the thread Steve

cheers RDD 

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16 hours ago, Ridge Runner said:

Back when D Tex said their detector could detect a dollar bill because the ink having metal in it.

At that time I was swinging a White's BFO detector.

Chuck

I was in Oklahoma around 196?  and Bill Mahan was demostrating the paper money detecting ability of his D Tex detectors. They did produce a weak signal at very close distance, not sure if it was the paper money or the BS that was detected. I was also using  a Whites BFO at that time

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That claim of detecting paper money permanently turned me off of D-Tex detectors. No wonder they were one of the early casualties of the detecting world.

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