Rick Watkins

Nevada Flooding

10 posts in this topic

I see a lot of moisture went through nevada,anyone know if winnemucca area got any of these gullywashers up in that area. Hoping it may have stirred the ground a little up there also.

Dont want to see any personal damage to the area but the ground needed a good cleansing in my opinion,springs a comin.         Rick

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I've been watching the news and have not heard of anything that far east. There has been some flooding on the Carson River and locally around Reno, but the water has not been quite as high in this part of the country as it was in early January.

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Thanks  chris ,theres still hope winters not over yet.  Hope to see you and steve this spring maybe.

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I'm planning to take my trailer up to Imlay for April and May and explore all over up there.
The one flooding I did hear of to the east was in Elko Co. where just the accumulation of water from all the storms in the last weeks caused a small reservoir to fail, and the dam was destroyed. However, just because there is no big river flooding up there does not mean some of the rain water flowing through gullys did not stir up some gold.

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On 2/11/2017 at 6:57 PM, Rick Watkins said:

I see a lot of moisture went through nevada,anyone know if winnemucca area got any of these gullywashers up in that area. Hoping it may have stirred the ground a little up there also

 

Hi Rick

I've been watching on the news here in Oz about the Oroville dam spillway problem (hope they get it fixed in time). It might be worth a trip to California after it all settles down again because there having a big gully washer over there at the moment !

Cheers ozgold

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Right now, its hard to get around in Northern California because of all the road closures and blockage for emergency road repairs.

Did a little prospecting in Calif. today, and got my first detected nugget of 2017. Rivers are high water and water is flowing down every little drainage. I saw a lot of little slides and places where erosion has done damage to the roadways.

There actually is some minor flooding in Nevada along the Humboldt river through Winnemucca from rain in Elko Co., but it wont affect prospecting much or expose any gold.

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Good to see a real amount of water in the humboldt river drainage, man that area has needed it for sure.

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On 2/11/2017 at 10:11 PM, mn90403 said:

Did Rye Patch Reservoir fill?

I've not been out that way, but with all the water flowing in the Humboldt, I am sure that by the end of spring it will be full. That will be good for the farmers in the Lovelock area.

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In the past couple of days, I have seen drone videos of the Bruneau river running across Idaho highway 51, just south of Jordan Valley, Idaho, a main route south through McDermitt, Nevada, then on to Winnemucca.  I am not sure if the water there has receded yet, as much north-south commerce use that highway.  I probably have already posted this somewhere here recently, but hey, I'm getting old! 

As an aside, the last time I saw the Rye Patch reservoir full, I crossed the Humboldt River, which fills the Rye Patch Reservoir on what is called the Callahan Bridge, just west out of Imlay Nevada.  The high water at that time was pushing against the concrete bridge, and some water had already began to run across the road, it appeared.  The good news was, there was evidence that a road grader had created a small dirt berm to help keep the water from further damaging the approach to the bridge...  I was not to be denied, and gave my truck the gas, and me and my little rv trailer took the chance and successfully crossed the mighty Humboldt!

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