Chris Ben

Maiden Run With My GPZ

17 posts in this topic

2 hours ago, Chris Ben said:

We'll not to bad mouth the ATX, because I did well with it and learned a lot about detecting for gold with it, but I had been through this wash with the 3 coils and didn't find anything. The gold was either too deep or too small for the ATX. I think it says more about how good the GPZ is.

Thankfully four times the money does buy a little something extra! Hang onto the ATX if you can - it easily handles hot rocks and salt ground that can be problematic for the GPZ in some places. I think a GPZ and GPX pair would be perfect but for me a GPZ and ATX works better reinforcing each other. The ATX folds up nice and is easy enough to take along as a backup.

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46 minutes ago, Steve Herschbach said:

Thankfully four times the money does buy a little something extra! Hang onto the ATX if you can - it easily handles hot rocks and salt ground that can be problematic for the GPZ in some places. I think a GPZ and GPX pair would be perfect but for me a GPZ and ATX works better reinforcing each other. The ATX folds up nice and is easy enough to take along as a backup.

Steve, I was thinking about selling it, but may reconsider. Maybe 

Chris 

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Wow nice work!

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9 hours ago, DolanDave said:

Congrats on the new detector, and finds Chris. That sure was a good day, and I think that patch has many more buried, need to get a small dozer out there :).  I confirmed Chris's meteorite, by cutting a window into it, so congrats on the gold n meteorite. I've been nugget/ meteorite detecting with Minelabs since I first got a sd2200 back in 2003, and haven't come close to your skill and determination, It came natural to you...Sorry but here is a bad pic I made with phone of Chris's meteorite find,  need to get one of those macro cameras for good close up pics...

20170212_180327-1.jpg

Skill and determination? Thanks man, but I'm learning from you, seriously. Not nearly as much determination as much as just plain stubbornness. Thanks for the kind words. Looking forward to next outing. 

Chris

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CB-P h e n o m i n a L  !!!!!!!!!!!! :rolleyes: all B e a u t i e s zzzzzz! 

Would be Hard to Have Much Confidence in Your Previous 2 Detectors. Now...IMO,

sell'em get a GB2 and yur done. Great Reality Share and Excellent pictures! Keep it Going Bro! 

Cheers, Ig

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Chris, you got me drooling on my key board. I can not wait to get out.

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7 hours ago, Randy Lunn said:

Chris, you got me drooling on my key board. I can not wait to get out.

Randy, I can't wait to get back out myself.!

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