Nokta Detectors

Pre-release - Brace For Impact :-)

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Dear Valued Members:

We are proud to announce the new IMPACT, that has been tested in 5 continents by more than 30 engineers, experts and users!

IMPACT is a 3-frequency device (5kHz/14kHz/20kHz) combining  multiple detectors  and enabling a unique yet easy-to-use detector experience for new to experienced detectorists.

Impact Features:
12 Search Modes (2 non-motion, 2 all metal, 8 discrimination modes)
Advanced Discrimination & Unmasking Ability
Online Firmware Updates
Optional 2.4 GHz Wireless Headphones
Vibration
LED Flashlight

  • Operating Frequency: 5kHz - 14kHz - 20kHz
  • Warranty: 2 years
  • Weight: 1.8 kg (4 lbs.) including search coil and batteries
  • 12 Search Modes:
  • 2 Non-motion Modes (with audio discrimination)
  • 2 All Metal Modes (with audio discrimination)
  • 8 Discrimination Modes - 2 Tone / 3 Tone / 4 Tones / 99 Tones / Deep / Conductive Ground / VLX1 and VLX
  • Ground Balance with 3 Options: Automatic, Manual, Tracking
  • Notch Filter: Discriminates single or multiple Target IDs of unwanted metals by silencing them or giving an iron tone.
  • Tone Break: Adjusts the break points of the target response tones on the Target ID range.
  • Iron Audio (Fe Vol): Turns off or adjusts the volume of the low iron tone
  • Audio Tone: Changes the frequency of target and threshold tones (150Hz - 700Hz).
  • iSAT: Allows for a stable operation of the device by eliminating false signals caused by high mineralization and hot rocks in the all metal and discrimination modes as well as eliminating threshold drifts caused by ground and temperature changes in the static modes.
  • Magnetic Mineralization Indicator: Shows mineralization intensity of the ground.
  • Extra features at the push of a button: Audio Boost, ID Normalization, Target ID Depth Level.
  • Backlight (Bright)
  • FD / Save: Easily saves your settings or restores factory defaults.

PRICING AND AVAILABILITY 
11000701 IMPACT STANDARD PACKAGE  MSRP: $849 USD
Includes: Waterproof IM28 - DD Search Coil  28 cm x 18 cm (11'' x 7''), Headphones, 4 x AA Alkaline Batteries, USB Cable

11000702 IMPACT PRO PACKAGE  MSRP: $999 USD
Includes: Waterproof IM28 - DD Search Coil  28 cm x 18 cm (11'' x 7''), Waterproof IM19 - DD Search Coil  19 cm x 10 cm (7.5'' x 4''), Headphones, Carrying Bag, Protective Covers, Stand, Extra Lower Shaft, AC & Car Charger, 4 x AA Rechargeable Batteries, USB Cable

Optional Search Coils:
Waterproof IM40 - DD Search Coil  40 cm x 35 cm (15.5'' x 14'') 
Waterproof IM24 - DD Search Coil 24cm x 13cm (9.5'' x 5")

We are now taking the pre-orders from dealers and product will start shipping to dealers the 3rd week of March.  We will ship the orders to dealers in the order they are received. 

Should you have any questions regarding the product, please do not hesitate to contact me.

Regards,

nokta-impact-specifications-packages.jpg

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As a rule going forward threads about the Nokta Impact will be moved to the Metal Detecting For Coins & Relics forum unless they are specific to gold prospecting. There are several threads going there already on the subject, in particular this one that provides a very detailed inside look at the prototype testing process. Worth a read by anyone interested in how this stuff gets done.

 

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Nokta Impact (with optional 7" x 4" DD coil) next to Makro Gold Racer

nokta-impact-makro-gold-racer.jpg

I would not characterize myself as a true tester of the Nokta Impact on the level of Tom Dankowski or others. I did however receive a late version prototype about 30 days ago to do a last minute check of the system. Unfortunately weather has been at record bad levels in my area and it has been difficult to put in the time on the unit it deserves. It is a relatively complex detector compared to most, with many different settings to experiment with. It has several unique features, one of the most important perhaps to potential early buyers being the ability to update the firmware over the internet. This does remove much of the risk inherent in buying early and holds out the promise of possible tweaks and improvements to come.

My focus being gold prospecting I can say that while the Nokta Impact is a very capable machine for gold prospecting it will not match the Makro Gold Racer for sensitivity to smaller gold. It is closer to the Nokta Fors Gold+ in that regard. Performance on gram plus gold is on par with other machines in the 13 - 20 kHz class, though the ability to drop to 5 kHz may provide some benefits in the worst ground on large nuggets, much like is seen with the 6.4 kHz mode on the Eureka Gold.

The Nokta Impact is a very intriguing metal detector, much like owning several different machines in one. The 99 tone mode has a VCO response more like one might expect of the DEUS than other full tone models, like my DFX. The Gen mode is quite unique being a threshold based all metal mode with a dual tone disc mode layered over it, what is referred to as a mixed mode. Wireless headphone capability (2.4 Ghz lag free) is built-in but headphones will be optional. Physically the unit is a well balanced 4.26 pounds with a straight shaft, molded post style grip. The cable is enclosed in the rod assembly for snag free operation and a clean look. The 7" x 4" DD coil is a real sweet option for trashy locations.

There is a more that I will comment on later when I have time. For now rest assured this is a true flagship detector that can run head to head with the best that any other manufacturer has to offer. In my opinion it signals Nokta/Makro arrival as a true top-tier contender. Look at two of the so-called Big 5, Tesoro and Garrett, and show me anything remotely like this machine.

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Hi all,

Just a quick observation, the Impact does has some familiar features that lean toward a more user friendly and possibly a better weight balanced machine.  I am curious about the Impact vs the Notka Gold in weight, as right now I am in a bit of a rush to get some pre-rain home landscaping done, and can't take the time for a look see on the Notka gold weight comparison...  At first blush, the machine is a reasonably priced machine for the features it has, is a nicely streamlined machine that could avoid brush hangup issues, but as Steve indicates, it does fall a bit short on the kHx and really small gold detecting ability.  That being said, the early Whites Goldmasters ran at a 19 kHz, and did a fair job in finding some reasonably small gold bits...   I often desire to have the newest of the new, just to satisfy my detecting curiosity, and would not be opposed to give one of the Impacts a go...  That is, when my brand new metal knee allows me to hit the goldfields...

Got to go...it will be interesting to see just what this new little gem will do...

Gary Long:  LARGO

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Hi Gary,

The published weights of the Nokta FORS detectors are understated at 3.9 lbs in their brochures, etc. I have weighed the FORS units with stock 11" x 7" coils and rechargeable batteries installed on my postal scales and they weigh 4.3 lbs. I have also weighed the Nokta Impact with batteries and 11" x 7" DD coil and they also weigh 4.3 lbs.

I usually round up however and on reviewing my notes the Nokta Impact weighs exactly 4 lbs 4.2 ounces  and the Nokta FORS CoRe and FORS Gold weigh 4 lbs 6 ounces, so the Impact is slightly lighter.

I find the angle and grip on the Impact to be superior to the FORS models. The FORS handles are canted forward more and the position of the trigger under your index finger makes it hard to get a full grip on the handle. No problem on the Impact.

All the black box Goldmasters ran at 50 kHz or 48 kHz on the GMT. You must be thinking of the original Fisher Gold Bug at 19 kHz.

I never actually indicated the Impact "falls short" on the kHz. Gold Bug Pro 19 kHz. White's MXT 14 kHz. Garrett AT Gold 18 kHz. Nokta FORS Gold + 19 kHz. Nokta Impact - 20 kHz max with 14 kHz and 5 kHz options. It simply cannot be expected to match the GMT at 48 kHz, Gold Racer at 56 kHz, or GB2 at 71 kHz. What I was trying to express is that the Impact "falls in line" with all the other mid-frequency "do-it-all" detectors and is not a true dedicated prospecting detector like the GMT or Gold Bug 2 or the new Minelab GM1000 at 45 kHz. That said I see no problem finding gold as small as a grain in the field with the Impact employing the small coil at 20 kHz. Gold less than a grain, not so much.

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Hi Steve, Thanks for the correction on the original Gold Bug being run at 19 kHz...   I knew that, but got in a rush trying to beat the expected rains in our area...  In the last day or so I saw the Bruneau river, just out of Jordan Valley, Idaho, was running across the southbound highway 51.   Lots of water to go around this year, I suspect the reservoir at Rye Patch will be full as well...

Gary Long:  LARGO

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Do I understand this correctly... The Impact will operate on 3 frequencies but only 1 frequency at a time unlike the V3i which will operate all 3 simultaneously.

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The Impact will operate at any one of three different frequencies (selectable frequency), not all three at once (multi frequency). Unfortunately the ad copy is referring to the machine as a multi frequency machine, which is going to cause confusion. Sadly, there is no exact agreement on the use of these terms and how they are applied.

The V3i can operate at any one of three frequencies OR all three at once. It along with the White's VX3 are fairly unique in having that capability.

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Never seen or even used a Nokta , if they worked then I would see them being used in the goldfields of Western Australia and I would be the first person to run out and buy one , unfortunately when it comes to nugget detecting in Aust. There is only one.... Minelab. I'm not a supporter of minelab and I wish there was anyone else out there with a detector that comes even close to the 4000 let alone the 5 or 7..... Please I'm all ears if anyone knows a brand that works better out here ?

 

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This thread is not about Minelab versus Nokta and nobody is claiming this detector is intended for use in the Australia goldfields. The Nokta Impact is aimed primarily at the coin and relic market. Keep using your Minelab. I personally do not think there is a brand that will work better for what you do.

All future posts I am making about the Nokta Impact will be at http://www.detectorprospector.com/forum/topic/3066-official-nokta-impact-announcement/ on the Coin & Relic Forum unless specifically related to gold prospecting.

 

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    • By Steve Herschbach
      I have been laying fairly low with the Nokta Impact so far. Part of that is I have been busy on other things. The main reason however is I quickly zeroed in on how I think the Impact will best serve me as a detectorist.
      In general I think I can speak for most people when I say we all like lighter weight detectors. However, one area where lighter is not better is when you use large coils. Balance is every bit as important as weight as it determines the amount of torque applied to your wrist as you swing the detector. A large coil on a very light detector creates a very nose heavy detector, one that will put more strain on you when you detect than a heavier but better balanced detector. It just so happens that the Impact with the rear mounted battery power/speaker module is a good design for a large coil from an ergonomics standpoint. This is especially true when in my experience Nokta has designed large coils that are quite light for their size. I was probably one of the first people that really zeroed in on the new IM40 15" x 14" DD coil when it was proposed for the Impact by Nokta. I got on an early wait list for the coil, and just received mine.

      Nokta Impact IM40 15.5" x 13.75" coil with scuff cover
      The IM40 DD coil measures 15.5" x 13.75" and comes with a fitted skid plate/scuff cover. The coil weighs 1 lb 13.0 oz or 822 grams as pictured with skid plate and cable and weighed on my postal scales. Yes, I had to say that as some people exclude cable weights from coils! For comparison the stock 11" x 7" IMP29 coil weighs 15.7 oz or 446 grams. I like the flat blunted ends on the IM40, which does help the Impact stay upright as the trailing edge of the coil acts as a flat bearing surface when the detector is at rest on the ground.
      I am not usually a fan of larger coils and in fact tend to lean to smaller coils for a lot of my urban metal detecting. Large coils "see" more area which can work against them in highly mineralized ground or in areas with lots of closely spaced trash. However, large coils even if they do not get more depth in highly mineralized ground can cover more area faster, and often ground coverage is every bit as important if not more so than depth. In medium to lower mineral ground a large coil can also offer that magic thing all detectorists crave - more depth!
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      The bottom line is I think the Nokta Impact and IM40 coil may be one of the very best options available for a person wanting to run a large coil on a VLF detector, with depths in all metal modes and milder ground that will challenge many PI detectors.
      For a lot of what I personally do, like gold prospecting or beach detecting, I will first attempt high frequency, high gain operation and then back off as ground or EMI conditions require. One thing it is important to know when running the Impact with large coils is how the Gain control works. If the Impact is running at Gain levels that are too high, the OVERLOAD message will appear on the screen. Note: You can increase or decrease the overload volume with the on/off button. When the volume of the device is at maximum, the overload volume will be low. As the volume of the device is lowered, the overload volume will increase. The electronic Gain has at least three distinct levels. There are distinct boosts between settings of 39 and 40 plus again between 69 and 70. Setting over 90 are a sort of hyper-Gain region only obtainable in low mineral/low EMI environments.
      Therefore I may attempt to start out in 20 kHz and a very high Gain. If overloading occurs I will lower the Gain for smooth operation, paying particular attention when I get down to 69.
      From there on down I need more field time, but at some point it will be better to drop to a lower frequency than to continue to lower the Gain setting. So in theory if at a setting of Gain 39 I still have issues at 20 kHz, it is time to go to 14 khz and run the Gain back up high. If conditions are still not amenable to running at 14 kHz and high Gain settings, I would then drop to 5 kHz and again attempt to run higher Gain levels. Note: people hunting larger, higher conductive items like silver coins and brass relics may very well just start out at 5 kHz. My focus is usually on lower conductive, smaller items i.e. gold.
      I so far have only done a small amount of detecting in a local park. I first tried Di3 and while it was working well enough the trash density was high and interpreting signals with a large DD coil can be challenging, especially when the coil generates multiple signals on very shallow items. I finally went to the unique GEN(D) mode and it was night and day. The GEN(D) all metal mode combined with the VCO effect makes sizing targets and identifying shallow targets a breeze, even in a trashy park situation. Shallow ferrous is easily identified also using GEN(D).
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      There is more I could mention about this subject but I really need time to get the hours on the Impact running the large coil to get more into specifics about how to get the best performance out of it. Large coil VLF hunting is not for everyone and is not a magic bullet in any case, but it does offer possibilities for the more adventuresome detectorist. I will close with a picture of my Nokta Impact with new IM40 coil. The detector with this coil is only slightly nose heavy (keep the rod as short as possible) and weighs with batteries 5 lbs 2.0 oz (5.13 lbs) or 2322 grams.