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Lunk

Diablo Pass V. 2.0

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Back in 2004 I stumbled upon a chondrite sitting on the desert pavement just west of Quartzsite, Arizona. I picked up 16 fragments within an area of 1 square meter. The meteorite was classified as the Diablo Pass L6 ordinary chondrite; details here:

https://www.lpi.usra.edu/meteor/metbull.php?sea=Diablo+Pass&sfor=names&ants=&falls=&valids=&stype=contains&lrec=50&map=ge&browse=&country=All&srt=name&categ=All&mblist=All&rect=&phot=&snew=0&pnt=Normal table&code=35516

Diablo Pass main mass:

35516_34778_3530.jpg

Fast forward to today: I was passing through the area and decided to revisit the site. Someone had toppled the small stone monument I had erected to mark the find location, presumably to look for more pieces of the meteorite. Apparently they missed a few; after removing the monument stones, I proceeded to detect 10 small fragments from the area, many of which display remnant fusion crust. Their combined mass is just over 6 grams.

IMG_0767.thumb.JPG.ee5fda492d4fd951ebe36a4e7417a8ad.JPG

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Very nice Lunk.....and congrats on a nice find, and that iron that was found out near Quartzite....

  How did the small pieces sound on your detector?

Dave.

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24 minutes ago, DolanDave said:

  How did the small pieces sound on your detector?

They sounded loud and clear Dave, there was no missing 'em!

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Hi Lunk,
I am still learning a lot as I add to my meteorite collection. You have really tuned your eyes (and ears) to see these highly weathered L6 meteorites. Thanks for setting a high standard for the rest of us.

Randy

L6 - "type 6: Designates chondrites that have been metamorphosed under conditions sufficient to homogenize all mineral compositions, convert all low-Ca pyroxene to orthopyroxene, coarsen secondary phases such as feldspar to sizes ≥50 µm, and obliterate many chondrule outlines; no melting has occurred."

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Thanks Randy,

The real kudos have to go to the detector I was using, as I have revisited the site with several models over the years and only ever found one more fragment...but the Gold Monster nailed these without hesitation.

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I was curious how the Gold Monster might work on meteorites. Good job!

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Thanks Steve,

I did make a prediction about it back in February:

And the Yucca DCA (Franconia strewn field) was one of the first places I made a bee line to when I was able to run with the pre release dealer demo unit back in March, which I touched on in the post I made after the GM 1000's official release:

Oh what fun!

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