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Lunk

Test Your Skills

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Many meteorite hunters prefer to search for space rocks using only their eyes to spot them on the ground. But when the area is strewn with dark colored terrestrial rocks that can mimic the look of a meteorite, relying on visual clues becomes a tough go. 

In the photo below, I had just found a stony meteorite exposed on the surface  with my metal detector. Test your skills and see if you can spot the chondrite. 

IMG_0789.thumb.JPG.383f90d59877850fb3696572e0286eb4.JPG

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Okay that's a lot of rocks to look at, so I'll help you out and bring it in a little closer:

IMG_0789.thumb.JPG.eb6a287c820c3a40a644bac61afd4992.JPG

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Congrats Glenn, you nailed it...good eye!

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25 minutes ago, Glenn in CO said:

Here's my guess:

 

Thanks! Lunk, hopefully I will do better out in field. I edit my post so someone else can try.

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well, my alternative color vision is sometimes a Dis-advantage...but, I guess the small dark rock about six inches to the right of the large rock on the left...just a few inches out of the shadow...

fred

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6 minutes ago, fredmason said:

well, my alternative color vision is sometimes a Dis-advantage...but, I guess the small dark rock about six inches to the right of the large rock on the left...just a few inches out of the shadow...

fred

Nice try, Fred...guess again!

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Clue to people - click on those photos for larger zoom versions!

That said, I will admit I would just walk right past what we are looking at without a clue. I really wonder how many meteorites I have walked past, or kicked aside as being a hot rock. I do therefore appreciate these informative posts!

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5 hours ago, Steve Herschbach said:

I will admit I would just walk right past what we are looking at without a clue. I really wonder how many meteorites I have walked past, or kicked aside as being a hot rock

Indeed Steve, they are difficult to spot. Fortunately the area I've been hunting is known for its H-chondrites, which have the highest percentage of iron-nickel metal alloy of the ordinary chondrite class of meteorites. In other words, they really make the detector squeal!

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