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Randy Lunn

Exploring Franconia

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Inspired by all the great posts on this forum I made my first trip dedicated to find meteorites. I spent the last three days in Franconia exploring the Yucca Dense Collection Area. I searched only the north side of the RR tracks. I spent one day each at the lower, middle and upper portions. Wow, this is not easy pickin's. I did find all the trash items advertised in other posts including seven 50 caliber bullets, a dozen small pieces of thin wire, lead fragments, etc. The geology and mix of rocks and minerals would make a great study.

I found five tiny meteorites that only totaled 3 grams, but I am thrilled I did not get skunked.

Franconia Bullets Other.jpg

5 Meteorites Found in Franconia May 2017.jpg

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Great finds Randy, congrats!

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very good detecting! Do you know about the mostly, very small irons?  My first stop there, I thought they were shrapnel so I threw them away...ignorance can be painful...

fred

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14 hours ago, fredmason said:

very good detecting! Do you know about the mostly, very small irons?  My first stop there, I thought they were shrapnel so I threw them away...ignorance can be painful...

fred

Fred, thanks for the heads up on the small irons. The chondrites are certainly easier to identify with a loupe. I will be careful not to toss out any small irons.

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Great finds Randy, congrats.... It is a large area to cover.

Dave

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