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      The old archive system has been closed and the threads moved to new forums. See the full forum listing here. Detailed explanation here.

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9 hours ago, ophirboy said:

Hi Mike 

The main thing about detecting is that no one has struck it rich with there detector in the cupboard . I'll read you a quote from a newspaper  correspondent at bendigo in 1852 " The new chum arrives believing that nuggets can be dug up as easy as potatoes in a farm paddock but soon discover that they will blister there hands and knock there shins on many a boulder before they see even the specks" If this sounds familiar your in good company . Detecting is about persistence and luck . You sound like your going to areas that are likely prospects however I purchased my first detector in 1976, it was a whites coinmaster 5000 D and I thought it was the ants pants it took me 2 years to find my first nugget but I just loved being out in the bush meeting and talking to other diggers. The Aussie diggings have been hammered for over forty years with all manner of detectors . And the PI detectors go very deep compared to vlf, so try and concentrate your efforts where the diggings where shallow or where the distance to the washing area was far away . Lots of dirt fell off wheelbarrows on the way to puddling machines or creeks. Or search out bedrock areas exposed on terrace or bench deposits as the yanks call them . These areas are obvious by the stacks of rocks with pathways between where the diggers washed the soil down to bedrock and needed to stack washed stone from the sluice boxes. If your finding small lead pieces then  your in the lottery with a chance , but as I have said before , ferrous junk can be identified by its irregular or wide signal . Rusting iron slowly leaches  into surrounding soil giving a small item a much bigger signal " halo effect" and a nail will even give a double signal because of its dual polarity like a compass needle. On the other hand non ferrous items with little corrosion give clean clear signals . These include brass bullet shells , eyelets, lead shotgun pellets , bullets and gold . I find detecting more enjoyable when you enjoy your surroundings and accept the junk as education that is slowly giving you the experience to find a nugget when your lucky enough to walk over one . I wish you well with the Nokta Impact and remember to share your knowledge with others when you become an expert.

Happy times on the diggings

Paul 🌈💰

Hi there ophirboy, A very good & well written post. Thank you for taking the time & effort. The old timer workings you described so well are the exact type places I take my little monster. Came across an old Whites Coinmaster 5000 D for sale on our local online auction site the other day. Bring back some memories for you.

http://www.trademe.co.nz/Browse/Listing.aspx?id=1389767854

I am just loading up my back pack for a hell walk in to some old high country workings. We have had a bit of a warm snap& some rain in the last week. Rivers are up with snow melt & the snow looks to have climbed out of this gully for the time being. Haven't been in there with the Zed & today is the day. Undecided about taking in the Monster due to the actual walk in.

Thanks again & best of luck out there

JW :smile:

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Good luck Kiwi , I had a look at some spots near skippers canyon a few years ago , nice country but cold in winter. 

Let us know how you get on.

🏔⛷

 

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On 12/08/2017 at 10:06 AM, ophirboy said:

Good luck Kiwi , I had a look at some spots near skippers canyon a few years ago , nice country but cold in winter. 

Let us know how you get on.

🏔⛷

 

Thanks mate. Very similar location to where I went into....so you will appreciate what I was in for if you have seen it first hand. I ended up taking the little Monster with me, how could I leave it behind?, as well as the Zed. 24 bits of gold. 18 for the Monster & 6 for the Zed. The sky was turning black,  It then started to rain with the looks of turning to snow. I had to bail. Two hour walk in mountain goat territory back to my wagon. Post to come. :biggrin: Cheers.

Good luck out there

JW :smile:

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Hi orhirboy.Sorry for the delay.Wow I thought I was an old timer but you beat me by 4 years.By coincidence I also bought a Whites 5000D, but in 1980 from the disposal shop in Elizabeth Street Melbourne across the street from the main post office and paid $400 for it.Went to Wedderburn that Easter and the bush was thick with tents and cars just like a major gold rush. Like everyone else I found nothing that day but did a lot of walking which probably delayed my heart attack 32 years later.Then 2 months later I went back and only found a couple there which I got friendly with and near Chinaman's Hill I found a 1 gram small specimen.The following year I found a half oz. nugget at Cup Gully which was all surfaced at least 7 foot deep but I found it 6 inches deep in the side of the gully.After that I bought a 16 inch coil which enabled me to find bigger nuggets 1/4 to 3 oz. beauties and they just kept rolling in.So now I am back with a more sophisticated machine than the Whites which is more suited to the very high mineralisation found here and much easier to use.Plan to get the 16 inch coil next year.The important difference now though  

is the nuggets have become very scarce but I recently bought over my Russian wife who sticks with me through thick and thin on the goldfields.Best of luck.Mike.

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Hi Orhirboy

Great review mate! And although these machines haven't been out all that long there are some people finding some nice gold with it! Just have to be patient I guess, And the thing that we also need to remember is that not everyone posts there finds for obvious reasons.  

But as you also stated it's got to be used for what it was intended for ! A Lamborghini is a beautiful car very expensive with some very high tech parts but if you take it out on bush tracks through the scrub looking for gold I can guarantee you it's not going to get you where you need to go!! As yes it's not made for going off road!. Everything has a particular purpose.

I've been speaking to a guy using his Monster on some old areas that some older Pi machines were used over, it's some chunky quartz s and slate crevices and using the small coil to squeeze in and around the big bits that a larger coil just can't get in between and he has done very well indeed with well over half an OZ been found in the past three weeks on a nice patch he found, some nice specimens there that his shown me.

So it's certainly a great little machine that punches well above its weight,  and as we know you can't find anything unless you put your coil over it! There's plenty of dirt out there and not much gold in comparison, so it dose come down to luck a majority of the time,  but the more your out swinging the detector the better your chances are of getting lucky! 

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 G,day Bhogg . Yes it's certainly an interesting machine . A nice machine for first timers if they can't afford  a PI . As others have said , you have to punch up the sensitivity for specialist crevice work , but the auto and auto plus are great for trouble free switch and go detecting .users have also commented on its beach ability so it might end up being a general purpose detector for a lot of people . I have found the user friendliness of the discriminator depends very much on how tough the mineralisation is your area . The Americans seem to be able to wind up the sensitivity a lot more and the ferrous - non ferrous bar graph becomes more reliable . Try it yourself with a lead shot or small nugget down around 5 inches . The monster pings it as sweet as honey but the graph won't budge to the right for love or money until you get it out of the ground . Sometimes just one swing to the right on another coil direction gives it away . I have become totally dependent on sound identification until it's in the surface pile .ive watched 2 videos of guys in Victoria passing over and missing larger nuggets with the GM , but they are running full sensitivity in high mineral conditions and simply overloading the ground response , running in auto or auto plus would have shown much better results . And your right Gold is not a renewable resource when it's gone it's gone. Good luck.     Paul

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I seem to run my GM differently than most here in the states. Where the ground is fairly even I run manual sensitivity, bumping up or down a notch as required. Place before last 6 - 7 - 8 was good, with 7 most of the time, and up or down a notch as needed. I keep it right where just a hint of ground noise bleeds through. If the ground gets too variable, then it is Auto or Auto+

The last spot was a little hotter, so 5 - 6 - 7 was the magic trio. In worse ground I can imagine 4 - 5 - 6 or even 3 - 4 - 5 as being required.

The only targets I skip are ones where the meter bangs hard ferrous over and over. But just one swing to non-ferrous or no meter reading at all - dig it. Preferable of course to dig everything but the trash sometimes disagrees!

Anyway, I think some people are having issues because they fear backing off the sensitivity. However, in casual testing on a one gram nugget I found the GM at sensitivity 7 to be roughly equal to the Gold Bug Pro at maxed out gain. I only run sensitivity 9 or 10 if I have a very small area that I am certain contains gold. I wish those setting were marked in red, like on my car RPM gauge. "you are redlining sir - hope she doesn't blow"! Just too hot for covering lots of ground in my opinion without creating too much noise. Great for mini patch and crevice work though.

With my Gold Bug 2 the trial was in always being on top of the ground balance. What I am enjoying about the GM is the ground balance is not a worry other than how fast you are moving. That makes just monitoring the "threshold" (faint ground feedback) easy with only a touch of my thumb to bump it up or down as required.

Anyway, perfect mate for my Zed. Sometimes that beast just tires me out, and it is fun to grab a light weight detector and go ping some small gold, which for me unfortunately is always easier than finding the big ones.

I really appreciate your reporting Paul - good stuff.

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Thanks Steve . I have not tried general searching using the manual as you would on  knob detectors  , I tend only to use it that way in pinpoint and dig mode . Bhogg was interested in the discrimination tests so I thought I would throw in the details . I had a 2 gram nugget ( see picture)that was slightly crystalline found first time out with the Gm that I buried in a test spot in what I would call medium to high mineralization soil ( see ironstone sample from that test spot in picture ) . I then drilled a 3/4 hole 5 inches deep and dropped the nugget in as not to disturb soil density.  I then set the monster to auto plus and scanned from multi directions and through the ground was noisey a typical non ferrous zip showed the presence of a good target ( the meter was pegged to the left on all passes) . I then switched to manual 5  but the ground was to noisey so backed down to 3 to get a comparable noise to auto plus. ( the meter would still show no movement to  non ferrous . But the signal was good . After retrieving the nugget I tested it in the same loose soil and the meter showed positive non ferrous around max 1 1/2 inches from the coil , it bounced between at 2 - 3 inches . So let this be a lesson to all you Aussie GM owners who only dig by the meter reading  . And as Elma Fudd would say " be vewy vewy careful.  .

IMG_0479.JPG

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  • Similar Content

    • By Steve Herschbach
      OK, I would never have considered the Gold Monster as a coin detector. Micro jewelry maybe, but coin detecting? Well, in the U.K. most detecting is "dig all non-ferrous" and there is a need for sensitivity to small items because Celtic gold and cut silver coins are small targets. Still, I was quite surprised to see this posted on the Minelab Facebook page. Food for thought for owners of the GM1000.

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      Click or double-click for larger photo size...

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