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West Aussie Gold Trip... Another Australian Gold Tourism Ad

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That is almost too good for me to imagine ... splitting 23 ounces and that being a tough trip!

Well done.

Thank you.

Mitchel

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Thanks Mitchel, it was arrogant of me to say 23 oz was not good. Its just that I go detecting there a lot and know many spots and do research and rely on my hobby gold income. I do aim for a big tally. Its gold fever I guess. But I am in a good place to detect, where big untouched patches still do exist. And I am sure there are some over there too. cheers RDD

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RDD, of interest perhaps, do you use moving map software such as Oziexplorer on a mobile device, with geological and topological maps, to assist getting to those researched locations? 

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Hi there RedDirtDigger, That my friend is an amazing amount of gold. How can you say that 23 ounces between two blokes in an 8 week period is not brilliant? Thats nearly 1.5 ounces each per week. Pretty bloody brilliant in my eyes. I can only dream of such rewards. Some beautiful bits there. Well done.Thanks for sharing.

Good luck out there

JW :smile:

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4 hours ago, Norvic said:

RDD, of interest perhaps, do you use moving map software such as Oziexplorer on a mobile device, with geological and topological maps, to assist getting to those researched locations? 

Hi Norvic, my mate runs Oziexplorer with geology/tenement layers to get us to coordinates and keep us away from Mining leases and on legal/40e ground. Close up viewing of google earth and WA sat imagery and sat burnt area maps from the NOAA satellites are the biggest help. Using sat imagery to find and mark the route of very faint 4wd tracks that get you close to where you want to go is main game in research to get to areas to explore I have found. RDD

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G'day RedDirtDigger, great effort mate, I know you really enjoy your trips to WA, and it was really enjoyable to catch up with you on your way past us and again on your way back past us. :smile: 

 

That big "Gold Digger Pick" I made for you came in very handy also, especially digging that large piece at 26" :smile: 

 

cheers dave

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Very well done Duck! love the flatties.

Glad the 19" is playing the game well.

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What a great trip and congrats on a real beauty of a nugget with the crystal formations

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Nice trip RedDirtDigger,  the flat one with the pyramids on it is my favorite. When you fellas go out on those long trips to hunt, what is the average amount of time ( hours ) spend detecting every day? I know many of us here in the States are in awe :ohmy:  when we see big gold and a lot of it from Aussie hunters, but I bet you're pounding the ground all day long. Hope your next trip brings even more...

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  • Similar Content

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      It seems they are still finding a few little nuggets out there Paul.  I doubt they will let you detect there but maybe you can go near?
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    • By fredmason
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