Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Steve Herschbach

From Mining Gold To Mining Neutrinos

Recommended Posts

Steve Herschbach    7,490

"The universe as we know it shouldn’t exist. Unlocking the reasons why may depend on once again striking gold in a mine buried a mile underground in rural South Dakota.The largest U.S.-based particle physics experiment ever is now under construction in the old mine in Lead, S.D., breathing new life into the small town more than 140 years after the Black Hills gold rush drove its founding.

Over the next 10 years, workers will remove more than 870,000 tons of rock and install a four-story high, 70,000-ton neutrino detector, while the lab's Illinois counterpart also undergoes significant renovations. The project will cost more than $1 billion, but scientists hope the payoff from about 12 million neutrinos per second passing through the detector will be far larger, tantamount to striking gold on a universal scale."

Read the rest at USA Today

Construction Details Here

IMG_0554.PNG

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lunk    749

Thanks for posting that article, Steve. I've been fascinated with particle physics ever since being shown a film about the atom in my 6th grade class.

It would be interesting to know how much gold will be in all that rock that is going to be removed. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
GB_Amateur    222

I'm going the other direction.  :biggrin:  I used to work in that field and would have been on this project if I had stayed.  Now I'm after gold.  (I enjoyed that, too, but I'm happy with my choice.)

I worked on a neutrino experiment (MINOS) in the Soudan Iron Mine in Minnesota.  Not as exciting as the Homestake Mine (and not even close to being as deep) but there is quite a bit in common.  Northeastern Minnesota is a pretty cool place (and in winter it's literaly a lot more extreme than 'cool').

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Reno Chris    1,067

Getting an ounce of gold is bad enough, imagine trying to collect an ounce of neutrinos........

  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
beatup    252

that project is not to far away from where i live,it has been interesting keeping up on it,s progress and all the other projects at the mine site

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Glenn in CO    102

My wife, sister, brother-in-law and I went to the Sanford Lab Homestake Visitor Center and took the tour last September when we were vacationing in the area. Anyone in the area would find interesting to take the tour and go through the visitor center.

Her's a link to the visitor center: http://www.sanfordlabhomestake.com/

vlcsnap-2017-08-10-22h06m18s408.thumb.png.2d6242953778ff003ba924f8f9d085da.pngvlcsnap-2017-08-10-22h06m48s826.thumb.png.9ae1ae3f0ce63e159e077359e400e857.png598d30b74ba83_HomestakeMine.thumb.jpg.ac18f984d5cfdc28bdf5cfbccc1856ee.jpg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

  • Similar Content

    • By geof_junk
      What Happened to the Gold Price in 1980?
      "In January 1980 gold hit a record 850 US dollars an ounce. After reaching those dizzy heights it then plummeted down and remained steady in the 300-400 dollar range for some years before starting to climb again to new levels. 

      Now gold has broken through the 900 dollars an ounce gold barrier and some investors and analysts are wondering, is this going to be a repeat of the 1980 gold spike? 

      In fact, there are many differences between the 1980 spike in the gold price and the current rise in gold value, not the least of which is the longer term trend currently occurring. In 1980 gold basically shot up like a bullet out of a gun and then, like a bullet, slowed down and returned to earth."
      Read the rest of the article at gold price.org
    • By Steve Herschbach
      VERMOGNO DI ZUBIENA, Italy — Italy may not be the first place that leaps to mind when you hear the words gold rush.
      But for thousands of years this neck of the northern Piedmont region, what some call Italy’s Klondike, has attracted prospectors seeking gold flowing down the Elvo River from deposits left eons ago by receding Alpine glaciers.
      Gold rushes in the area have ebbed and flowed over the centuries, but they have seen a revival in recent, recession-hit years. Increasing numbers of people have been contacting local gold-seeking associations hoping to get rich quick.
      Rest of the story..... https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/28/world/europe/italy-gold-rush.html?_r=0
       
      Sample of the Golden Times, magazine of the World Goldpanning Association.
    • By GoldEn
      Hi all
      for some who did not see it here is:
       
      its bigger then Texas 
       
       
      Hope you enjoy watching.
       
       
      GoldEN
    • By Steve Herschbach
      "A giant gold coin bearing the Queen's image, and worth $4m (£3.2m), has been stolen from a museum in Germany. The Canadian coin, nicknamed the "big maple leaf", has a face value of $1m - but because it is 100kg (220lb) of pure 24-carat gold, its value is much higher at today's price for gold bullion. It was taken during the night from the Bode Museum in Berlin."
      Read the full story here

    • By Tnsharpshooter
      http://www.sfgate.com/bayarea/article/gold-panning-oroville-dam-storms-erosion-10966360.php
    • By Steve Herschbach
      Just an observation. The price of gold as measured in U.S. dollars has been remarkably stable, averaging around $1200 per Troy ounce for going on four years now. This chart was generated at Gold.org starting in July 2013. Click on image to enlarge.

      Of course the currency used makes a difference. While gold has been stable or even slightly declined in U.S. dollars over the last four years, it has overall been on the increase as measured in Australian dollars.

      In my opinion rising gold prices have had a lot to do with keeping many of us in the field still metal detecting for gold. In the U.S. and Australia the easy detectable gold has been playing out, and where finds were once measured in ounces per day finding grams per day is now more common. Yet when I started getting serious about metal detecting for gold around 1998 the U.S. price was under $300 per ounce. Back then if I could detect eight ounces of gold in a week and get the full price for it, I would have been looking at around $2400. Now at $1230 I only have to find about 2 ounces of gold in a week to net the same $$2400. Of course a buck is not worth what it used to be, but in my opinion this overall increase in the price over the last 20 years is propping up the electronic prospecting in older, played out regions. And while prices have been stable here the last four years you Aussies have actually seen a bit of increase over the last couple year - that has to help. I wonder how many people would still be out detecting for gold if it was still under $300 per ounce?
×