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ATX Deepseeker Coil

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I received the deepseeker coil when I obtained my ATX.  I have only been using the stock coil to date, but had a few questions on the larger coil. 

Since my shaft on the stock coil is partially stuck in the extended position (as much as I have tried to loosen it), and I would like to take the ATX to Houston next week on a business trip (that I hope to find time to do a little Galveston beach hunting... suggestions welcomed)...  will the 20" be overkill for my intended hunting?  What experiences have you had using the deepseeker coil on the beach?  What should I know? 

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Personally I don't think it would be overkill at all. The big coil honestly does not add much depth on coin size targets - it will reach deep for big junk though! The main thing it does is give you great ground coverage for those huge beaches. If you experiment a little too you will find you can hold the coil a little higher than normal off the beach and avoid picking up tiny foil or ferrous bits. Yet still get good depth due to the larger size.

Sounds like fun - good luck!

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Thanks Steve.  Unfortunately, my work schedule wouldn't allow time for detecting this trip, but I am planning a little extra time during the next trip to the Houston area to try out the gulf south beaches. 

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