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Thanks Mop. Interesting how later technology only finds small bits on the areas worked with the proto's. The biggies are gone.

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JR,

I'm wondering the land owners.  How did they come by it?

Years ago I was told that Florida cattle ranchers and others could have moved to Australia to set up operations for cow/calf and sheep.  If they did so they would have been guaranteed land.  Did this land include the minerals?  Was any of that land or any of the land you prospect now part of that plan?

It would be a big boon to the rancher.  They would or could still be interested as the farmers in Britain are willing to split with relic hunters.

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1 hour ago, mn90403 said:

JR,

I'm wondering the land owners.  How did they come by it?

Years ago I was told that Florida cattle ranchers and others could have moved to Australia to set up operations for cow/calf and sheep.  If they did so they would have been guaranteed land.  Did this land include the minerals?  Was any of that land or any of the land you prospect now part of that plan?

It would be a big boon to the rancher.  They would or could still be interested as the farmers in Britain are willing to split with relic hunters.

Ok. The grazing and cropping properties in Victoria are mainly freehold and in many cases have been handed down through the generations since original settlement. How did they come by it? To grossly oversimplify the process, basically they selected it and were then granted title providing they fenced it. However, freehold title does not entitle the owner to the mineral wealth beneath or on the ground and, consequently, many parts of the state are under different mining exploration licenses. The arrangements made between freehold owners and small prospectors and detector operators are largely unaffected by these bigger EL's and are organised by mutual agreement.

Under Victorian state regulations, the holder of a Miners Right is entitled to prospect on government land and keep what they find. This was a right earned long ago in the wake of the battle of the Eureka Stockade at Ballarat in 1854. This "Right" has since been eroded considerably by "green" pressure and, increasingly,  much government land is now closed to detecting, and indeed, large scale mining.

To sum up: The freehold land owner does not own the gold, and has the authority to deny entry to detector operators (but not EL holders) All our freehold detecting is carried out with permission, and usually under a deal.

 

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mn, in reply to your question, I found my first color at Wedderburn in central Victoria in 1979. It weight about 3 grams and was detected with a Whites Coinmaster under a tree at a spot called 'shicer' gully.

I guess the guy who inspired me the most, and found a staggering amount of gold in Victoria, West Australia and Queensland was John Hider Smith. I was fortunate to work with John for some time, and was amazed at his ability.

I currently work on the odd project with James Beatty, when he is not busy farming, and enjoy his company immensely. (he is pretty handy with a detector as well)

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jrbeatty, thank you for reposting all those great photos and the stories behind them. Much appreciated. 

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19 hours ago, Reg Wilson said:

mn, in reply to your question, I found my first color at Wedderburn in central Victoria in 1979. It weight about 3 grams and was detected with a Whites Coinmaster under a tree at a spot called 'shicer' gully.

I guess the guy who inspired me the most, and found a staggering amount of gold in Victoria, West Australia and Queensland was John Hider Smith. I was fortunate to work with John for some time, and was amazed at his ability.

I currently work on the odd project with James Beatty, when he is not busy farming, and enjoy his company immensely. (he is pretty handy with a detector as well)

Reg,

Thank you for the response.  There just seem to be things that trigger a direction in our lives.  

I got a Coinmaster in 86 and used it in the desert a couple of times but found no gold (some relics and trash) ... how different things might be today if I had found some.  I used it on the beach but stopped and I didn't get my first gold detector until 2010.  How different things could be with a proper mentor.

There is still time as Norvic says!

Mitchel

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On 10/8/2017 at 12:50 PM, jrbeatty said:

Thanks Mop. Interesting how later technology only finds small bits on the areas worked with the proto's. The biggies are gone.

Seems that way, but I live in hope that a nice one will come my way eventually :biggrin:

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1 hour ago, Mop said:

Seems that way, but I live in hope that a nice one will come my way eventually :biggrin:

Hey Mop! I only meant the biggies are gone from the areas worked by the prototype SD's. Make no mistake, the damn things are still hiding elsewhere!!!  :smile:

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17 minutes ago, jrbeatty said:

Make no mistake, the damn things are still hiding elsewhere!!!  :smile:

Not where I detect they aren't. :rolleyes: Aint through lack of trying. I seem to be able to find the tiny ones though :unsure:

JW :smile:

 

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On with the show.

Dunolly gold:

2vl3cqr.jpg

14 ozs north of Dunolly

fdvxh0.jpg

39ozs Berlin Rush
sutspf.jpg

Detail of above:

bhi169.jpg

Reg writes:  "The late "Kiwi" Russel Barker (on right) detected a 250 oz nugget at Clovers gully, Dunolly. John, Ian, and I worked with him for a time in 89-90.  The nugget had been heard by John but he had dismissed it as a junk signal"

286v676.jpg

13 0z Wedderburn west:

v820eb.jpg

On a lighter note:

The late Jimmy Stewart about to be tipped off the coil sled by manic biker John Hider Smith. WA goldfields late 90's:

11j9jbp.jpg

Reg Wilson. Rain in the west, late 90's
He still uses that old green Transit van for his prospecting vehicle  Very Happy :

33vku87.jpg

This one appeared in "Gold Gem and Treasure" magazine many years ago, in a story Reg wrote on Indian gold mining:

fac489.jpg

 

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