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Minelab Equinox Multi-IQ Technology Part 1

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Here is a Minelab Treasure Talk on the Equinox Multi-IQ Technology..

http://www.minelab.com/anz/go-minelabbing/treasure-talk/equinox-technologies-part-1

EQUINOX Technologies (Part 1)

October 19, 2017 03:23pm

Minelab Electronics
Minelab Logo - colour.png

This is the first instalment in a blog series introducing and explaining the technologies inside our new EQUINOX detectors…

Background

When Minelab started developing our EQUINOX detector, we looked very closely at all of the current market offerings (including our own) to reassess what detectorists were really after in a new coin & treasure detector. A clear short list of desirable features quickly emerged – and no real surprises here – waterproof, lightweight, low-cost, wireless audio, and of course, improved performance from new technology. This came from not only our own observations, but also customers, field testers, dealers and the metal detecting forums that many detectorists contribute to.

While we could have taken the approach of putting the X-TERRA (VFLEX technology) in a waterproof housing and adding a selectable frequency range, this would have been following the path of many of our competitors in just rehashing an older single frequency technology that had already reached its performance limits. Another option would have been to create a lower cost waterproof FBS detector, but that also had its challenges with FBS being ‘power hungry’, needing heavier batteries, heavier coils, etc., and relatively high cost compared to the more recent advances that our R&D team have been making with the latest electronics hardware and signal processing techniques.

When Minelab develop a new detecting technology we aim to create a paradigm shift from existing products and provide a clear performance advantage for our customers.

Our Technology History

The multi-frequency broad band spectrum (BBS) technology that first appeared in Sovereign detectors in the early 1990’s provided an advantage over single frequency coin & treasure detectors. This evolved into FBS with Explorer, all the way through to the current CTX 3030 (FBS 2).

minelab-vlf-bbs-fbs-timeline.jpg

The multi-period sensing (MPS) PI technology that first appeared in the SD 2000 detector in the mid 1990’s gave a significant advantage over single frequency gold detectors. This key technology exists in the current GPX Series detectors today.

minelab-cw-pi-cvt-gold-detector-timeline.jpg

Zero Voltage Transmission (ZVT) is our latest gold detection technology implemented in the GPZ 7000 and is a recent example of Minelab’s continued innovation beyond ‘tried and true’ technologies to achieve improved performance.

Further to our own consumer products, our R&D team also has significant experience working with the US and Australian military on multi-frequency technologies for metal detection.

Introducing Multi-IQ

Multi-IQ is Minelab’s next major innovation and can be considered as combining the performance advantages of both FBS and VFLEX in a new fusion of technologies. It isn’t just a rework of single frequency VLF, nor is it merely another name for an iteration of BBS/FBS. By developing a new technology, as well as a new detector ‘from scratch’, we will be providing both multi-frequency and selectable single frequencies in a lightweight platform, at a low cost, with a significantly faster recovery speed that is comparable to or better than competing products.

MULTI-IQ

We have come out with a very bold statement that has captured a lot of market attention:

“EQUINOX obsoletes all single frequency VLF detectors”

Multi-IQ achieves a high level of target ID accuracy at depth much better than any single frequency detector can achieve, including switchable single frequency detectors that claim to be multi-frequency. When Minelab use the term “multi-frequency” we mean “simultaneous” – i.e. more than one frequency is transmitted, received AND processed concurrently. This enables maximum target sensitivity across all target types and sizes, while minimising ground noise (especially in saltwater). There are presently only a handful of detectors from Minelab and other manufacturers that can be classed as true multi-frequency, all of which have their own advantages and disadvantages. 

How does Multi-IQ compare to BBS/FBS?
Multi-IQ uses a different group of fundamental frequencies than BBS/FBS to generate a wide-band multi-frequency transmission signal that is more sensitive to high frequency targets and slightly less sensitive to low frequency targets. Multi-IQ uses the latest high-speed processors and advanced digital filtering techniques for a much faster recovery speed than BBS/FBS technologies. Multi-IQ copes with saltwater and beach conditions almost as well as BBS/FBS, however BBS/FBS still have an advantage for finding high conductive silver coins in all conditions.

There’s much more information to share with you about Multi-IQ, as we put the finishing touches to EQUINOX and carry out final field testing around the world. Stay tuned for Part 2…

minelab-equinox-multi-iq-metal-detector-technology.jpg
* 20 kHz and 40 kHz are not available as single operating frequencies in EQUINOX 600. The Multi-IQ frequency range shown applies to both EQUINOX 600 and 800. This diagram is representative only. Actual sensitivity levels will depend upon target types and sizes, ground conditions and detector settings.

 

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Thanks for posting the link - I copied over the content. Usually a no-no but I have never yet had a company complain about my copying marketing information.

Sounding good so far :smile:

 

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You bet.  Thanks for copying the content. Now we can all see Minelabs goofy Multi-IQ graph and try to figure out what it's showing. 

I like the quote: "Multi-IQ achieves a high level of target ID accuracy at depth much better than any single frequency detector can achieve, including switchable single frequency detectors that claim to be multi-frequency."

cant wait to try it out..

Bryan

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They do draw nice graphs and state BBS/FBS will still have a slight advantage over certain targets. That’s the same as saying. We’ve gone and fixed its shortcomings. Now that just made me smile twice.

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Hi Bryan,

I am probably more excited than most people by this detector for various reasons but have been trying to keep a lid on it. I have slowly been forced into the "Minelab camp" over the years by the lack of progress from other manufacturers. I simply seek out what works for me, and the reality more and more is that just happens to be Minelab detectors. You add that to the work I have done with Minelab on recent products and I now am in danger of becoming just another "Minelab shill". So while I could go on at great length about all the positive attributes I see in this machine I so far have remained fairly silent about it. Frankly, you are doing such a great job with some of your lengthy posts Bryan that anything I say would be redundant anyway!

minelab-equinox-metal-detector-multifrequency-waterproof-wireless-studio.jpg

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Agree with all the comments above.  Including my excitement to get the EQX in my hands an on the ground.  This is a very interesting article, and looking forward to even more information as the release date nears.

2 hours ago, Steve Herschbach said:

Hi Bryan,

I am probably more excited than most people by this detector for various reasons but have been trying to keep a lid on it. I have slowly been forced into the "Minelab camp" over the years by the lack of progress from other manufacturers. I simply seek out what works for me, and the reality more and more is that just happens to be Minelab detectors. You add that to the work I have done with Minelab on recent products and I now am in danger of becoming just another "Minelab shill". So while I could go on at great length about all the positive attributes I see in this machine I so far have remained fairly silent about it. Frankly, you are doing such a great job with some of your lengthy posts Bryan that anything I say would be redundant anyway!

To your comment Steve, I think all of us that have a "go to" machine or series of machines could be accused of being a shill for our own preference company... but I believe I speak for all on this site when I say that nobody here believes you are hawking the brand for brand's sake.  When you comment on a product, we know it is through detailed research and testing and based on your extensive experience and background in this arena.  If a product doesn't live up to the hype or even the company promises, you will say that... and that is what I respect about you.  If a product us great, you say that too... and because of your honesty, you are trusted. 

I currently own 4 brands and 7 machines, and enjoy each brand/machine for different reasons.  From what I can see (in my opinion, most likely not everyone's), Minelab appears to be taking machine innovation in a new and different direction compared to some other brands, and recognizing some new innovations already released by competitors...  and that is what has me most excited about the release of the EQX. 

Tim.

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Thanks Tim. I actually do try hard to spread the love around when it comes to manufacturers. That reveals itself on the forum by my posting the new stuff no matter what the brand is. I always want to know what everyone is up to whether I want a particular detector or not. The AT Max is a good example. I am not getting one but I do want to know all about it. Just part of being a “student of metal detecting”.

However, the last few years U.S. manufacturers have really left me wanting. Most of the time a new detector is just an old detector in a different package. Or an old detector but with one new feature added but still basically the same. It seemed like nobody, including Minelab, was listening at all to what people want. Nokta / Makro was a real breath of fresh air in their “aggressive listening” posture.

It does however appear Minelab was also listening, and listening hard. This statement is very telling:

”When Minelab started developing our EQUINOX detector, we looked very closely at all of the current market offerings (including our own) to reassess what detectorists were really after in a new coin & treasure detector. A clear short list of desirable features quickly emerged – and no real surprises here – waterproof, lightweight, low-cost, wireless audio, and of course, improved performance from new technology. This came from not only our own observations, but also customers, field testers, dealers and the metal detecting forums that many detectorists contribute to.”

The Equinox of course reflects this, but there is also the work being done on the new Minelab online parts store and the new Minelab service center coming online. This tells me Minelab has been listening in more ways than one. Parts availability and service have been two real weak areas for Minelab. With the Equinox launching there is no better time to clean up these other loose ends. It appears to me that Minelab is making a full court press in 2018.

Anyway, I just sold off several other VLF models though I am hanging on to a few still for oddball reasons. As I look forward to 2018 however it would appear nearly all my detecting will be with just two Minelab detectors - the GPZ 7000 and Equinox 800. Between the two I can do just about anything so the other machines I have will be bit players by comparison.

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I've had more detectors in the last 10 years than the 40 before. Some I still have but others was sold only to buy another. This time to put money down for the Equinox not one detector left home to buy it. I'm not saying I'll keep all of them but in the case of a coin detector I'll have a backup and on the nugget side it's backup,backup plus backup. What can I say other than I just can't help myself.

Rob had a killer price on a 7000 because of a damage box and I told him I had to stop reading about it. My reasoning is I keep salivating over my key board when I'd read about it. Now I've got my money down and as I read more about the Equinox I find my self doing the same.

I've told anyone when in heat don't promise anything rash and this is what's call Heat Rash. This is where I find myself as I hear more about the Equinox. In a state of heat rash.

Write this down someplace; A detector is not a toy but a tool that we all need at one time are another for different applications.

Chuck  

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