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On ‎11‎/‎3‎/‎2017 at 7:55 AM, Jim in Idaho said:

Really nice, Bob! From what I've seen in Wyoming, and Idaho, blue flourescence is fairly rare. That "tube" nodule is also a special find.

Jim

Jim Idaho, I actually see quite a bit of blue which is mostly calcite and some agate. Don't know much about rocks from your part of the country. I do have some stromatolites I think from Montana or Wyoming,  Bob

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Interesting how one man's rarity is another's common find...LOL

Jim

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Nice mix of jasper and petrified bog

IMG_0112~1.JPG

jas3~1.JPG

bog2~1.JPG

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Bob... I presume that you have one of those handsome jasper specimens mounted and displayed somewhere prominent within your home. WOW!!! I like the darker sample photo too, it almost (with some imagination) looks like something from outer space!!!  WTG. :cool:

Jim.

PS:  Merry Christmas !!! 

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Bob, that bottom slab of chert looks familiar :smile:!

 Love the jasper slab .... from Alaska?

We picked up some nice jasper from a trip up on the haul road this summer.

Some of those creeks have some wild conglomerate boulders !

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Jim, that jasper specimen is in the house, so is the "bog".

Dick, I knew you would recognize that piece. Jasper is Alaskan from

the Talkeetna Mts. Some big chunks there that are to big to haul out. What

does the haul road jasper look like??  Kanayut conglomerate is probably

what you found in the Brooks-has various colors of chert. photo of Kanayut chert 

5a374f47470db_IMG_03351.JPG.9602b5bd229b9f951892e600a29fbeb5.JPG

 

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Bob,

 Nothing as nice as your piece of jasper but Tolovana river has some nice smaller pieces. All buried in snow or I'd take a couple pics for you.

 You nailed it on the conglomerate. Man there was some massive boulders of it though!

conglomerate.thumb.jpg.9b93d055472f80ddc16c72d7f930a9ff.jpg

 

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2 questions:

 

is shortwave light the the same as black light?

 

is conglomerate the same as 'pudding rock'?

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Around here (Midwest USA), black light is ultraviolet.

For us, "pudding rock" is usually mudstone that had glacially rafted rocks dropped in it before being lithified (cemented into rock).  It isn't conglomerate, because the majority of the rock isn't the cobbles and or pebbles, but the siltstone or mudstone.  Conglomerate is the lithified rocks of what was once, for instance, a stream bed or river bed or alluvial fan section that was subsequently buried and lithified. Conglomerate rock, as a bedded sedimentary rock body, is mostly made up of what were once boulders or cobbles or pebbles with the minor fraction being finer sediments and cement.  Since "pudding rock" isn't necessarily a technical term, however; people might use that term differently in different localities.  So, maybe in some areas pudding stone is the term people use for conglomerate, which is an actual geological term.

Apologies if that was long winded.

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What Marx said, Pudding rock and conglomerate kind of are similar. 

As far as lights, black light is a type of ultraviolet but not much good for 

use with minerals. There are three wave lengths used on minerals, short, med and long. For

where I'm at short wave works best on most Alaskan minerals that fluoresce , but long does work on 

some. Medium I have never used.

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