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Tiftaaft

Vaq Black

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Thought I would throw some love at the Tesoro forum since it has been quiet here since Steve set it up. 

I recently purchased a Vaquero Black with both the 12x8 and the 5.75 widescan.  I am still choosing my locations and learning the settings, but there is just something about running a Tesoro... so much fun!!  My intent was for it to be a good grab and go for tot lots, curb strips and edges of basketball courts, though I do have a Compadre as well.  But the 12x8 also lends itself to walking into the field as well.  While I am still trying to understand the true depth of this unit, it is definitely meeting my initial expectations, and I believe it can also be a good unit to hit areas that I have already covered with my other detectors, and possibly squeak out an additional find or two.. especially with the 5.75 coil.  I have already found a couple of junk rings and a good ratio of clad for the actual swing time I have posted... looking forward to finding some gold, or something with a little age to it.  HH Tim.

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I have an Outlaw and it's a nice machine. Also have a Deus V4, and a V3i. V3i's too heavy for my arm now. The Deus is nice and I'm learning it. The Outlaw is less stressful and faster to adjust on the fly using my thumb on the disc knob. All get the same depth with comparable coils. They all have their place. I'm waiting for the Equinox shakedown before ordering one. Not doing the send back for firmware updates like I had to do with the MX Sport. Happy with my stable now Tesoro's a good machine for it's purpose.

Enjoy and be happy every day

John

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I used to have a Tesoro Vaquero and actually found a few gold nuggets with it. At 14 kHz and with manual ground balance it is a decent little prospecting detector. I never knew they came out with a black version however - I like it!

Tesoro has been fading from the scene but I hope a few fans may show up on this forum since they are not getting much love elsewhere.

tesoro-vaquero-black-metal-detector.jpgtesoro-vaquero-specifications-features.jpgtesoro-vaquero-controls.jpg

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Just looked up the definition of 'monolithic' on the WWW:  "formed of a single large block of stone."  I take it that's not what they mean.  :rolleyes:  Would someone please explain what they do mean when they say 'monolithic searchcoil'?

 

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In some weird way Tesoro uses "monolithic" to refer to the coil housing construction material, which in this case is carbon fiber. You will see Monolithic (Carbon Fiber) noted in Tesoro literature about the 9 x 8 coil though I have not been able to find an official explanation anywhere.

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From 1991 at https://www.losttreasure.com/Home/FieldTestDetail/6071

"this new slim plastic control housing and the new brown 8-inch searchcoils incorporate a technical improvement called monolithic shielding. Imbedded in the plastic is a special material that helps shield both the coil and the electronics from extraneous signals-the result is fewer false responses."

So instead of using a conductive paint inside the coil for electrostatic shielding the coil housings and even control housings themselves are made conductive by impregnating them with carbon fiber. Monte confirms this here:

"In a March 18, 1991 Tesoro Dealer Newsletter, Tesoro described their new feature as this: Monolithically shielded searchcoils and control housings- an industry first from Tesoro! The shielding is a homogeneous part of the plastic, providing continuous control over external interference."

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1 hour ago, GB_Amateur said:

 "formed of a single large block of stone." 

I have a couple of machine/coil combinations that the swingweight could be described as "monolithic" based on that definition.  ;)

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Thanks for the reply regarding the meaning of 'monolithic', Steve.  Now it makes sense but I never would have figured it out without the details and quote from their 26 year old newsletter.

I have a couple more questions for you guys (and any other Tesoro users for that matter):  1) how many tones does the Vaquero (and other Tesoros) have?  2) Are the modern Tesoro detectors a throwback to the (good old?) analog days in their response?  That's a pretty vague description/question, I realize.  What annoys me still (yeh, of course I live with it because of all the nicities digital signal processing brings) is that sometimes over large targets I get a short, clean tone (not actually clipped, though) making it sound like a small target when it isn't small at all.  I don't remember analog detectors doing that.

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Tesoro detectors by and large are based on a simple "beep-dig" concept. They have minimal discrimination options and almost all the models made either accept or reject targets without using tones. They are not so much a throwback to old analog designs - they ARE old analog designs!

The Vaquero above is classic. The disc knob sets the discrimination breakpoint. All items above the setting go "beep" and all items lower than the setting are ignored or silent. You get the classic old detector decision. You can set the control to ignore most pull tabs and accept most coins, but you will tune out nickels. If you lower the setting to accept nickels, you will dig most pull tabs. Some Tesoro models feature dual disc controls that set up the old knob version of a notch discriminate. A couple models made the transition to digital and have minimalistic LCD displays - the Cortes and DeLeon. They have deluxe discrimination by Tesoro standards (target id numbers!) but which would be considered minimal by today's standards.

The now discontinued Golden uMax had tones as does the DeLeon, but that is about it. Tesoro has never been very interested in tones as a discrimination method.

The bottom line is Tesoro detectors are excellent single frequency detectors that perform well and are light in weight. They also used to be a low cost option, but with so many other companies reducing prices the Tesoro models now actually look a bit pricey for the basic features offered. They are dependable performers that do well in trash and so are popular with relic hunters in particular, who favor dig all non-ferrous type detecting.

Try as I might I could find no simple comparison chart for tesoro models online or in their old catalogs. You have to compare features on their website or possibly use the Kellyco Detector Comparison feature. Take the Kellyco page with a grain of salt however as I have found it to have inaccurate information at times. Still, it is a quick way to narrow choices down, and then confirm features at the manufacturer websites.

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Quote by Tiftaaft: Thought I would throw some love at the Tesoro forum since it has been quiet here since Steve set it up. ... Tim, glad you posted this, and as a long-time Tesoro fan, for over 34 years now, I'll have to devote more attention to this Forum. 

I recently purchased a Vaquero Black with both the 12x8 and the 5.75 widescan.... I also added the newer black-packaged Vaquero to my detector team and outfitted it for my needs and wants.  The  'Black' Vaquero comes standard with the new 8X11 RSD Double-D coil which works well for me in my Tesoro set-up because I grab this unit with this bigger coil for coverage when hunting a beach, a plowed field or other larger open-area that has metal targets well spaced.  That allows me to get the benefits of depth-of-detection the Vaquero provides.

As a rule, even though I have been using Double-D search coil designs since putting the early Compass Yukon TR models to work in 1971, I still prefer a Concentric coil over a DD most of the time ... if I have that option.  I do with the Vaquero, and I keep the thin-profile 6" Concentric mounted full-time on my Vaquero.  (Marketing folks thought the 5.75 name would be cute but the coil measures almost exactly 6" in diameter.)

I am still choosing my locations and learning the settings, but there is just something about running a Tesoro... so much fun!!... 'Fun' is a key word to figure in when using any detector that is simple, functional, and works really well for our wants and needs, and the Vaquero fits that category, to be sure.  For me, settings are pretty easy:

• I adjust for a proper slight audio Threshold hum.

• Usually GB to be spot-on when hunting in the All Metal mode, or just slightly negative when searching in the Discriminate mode.

• Discrimination is either set at 'minimum' to respond to non-ferrous targets and most ferrous debris, or increase just to the point where I just barely reject common iron nails.  I never use more than that. 

• Unless I am close to some interfering source, I leave the Frequency Shift toggle in the center position to operate at 14.5 kHz.

My intent was for it to be a good grab and go for tot lots, curb strips and edges of basketball courts, though I do have a Compadre as well.  But the 12x8 also lends itself to walking into the field as well.  While I am still trying to understand the true depth of this unit, it is definitely meeting my initial expectations, and I believe it can also be a good unit to hit areas that I have already covered with my other detectors, and possibly squeak out an additional find or two.. especially with the 5.75 coil.  I have already found a couple of junk rings and a good ratio of clad for the actual swing time I have posted... looking forward to finding some gold, or something with a little age to it.  HH Tim.... All my Tesoro units serve the "grab-and-go" niche in my arsenal, but at times I also work them like I used to as a primary search tool.  Generally they are my first pick for cruising tot-lots and playgrounds at parks and schools, hitting sidewalk tear-ups and other renovation work, and for 'scouting' out-of-the-way locations I research to see if there is a hint of potential production at the site.

I did send my Vaquero to Tesoro to get the high-tone modification, and while it isn't quite as high as what I get from my Silver Sabre µMAX (pronounced microMAX) it makes the audio response a lot more 'hearable' for my impaired hearing/deafness.

 

Quote by GB Amateur: I have a couple more questions for you guys (and any other Tesoro users for that matter):  1) how many tones does the Vaquero (and other Tesoros) have?... Steve H. gave you good answers, but the Vaquero, like the majority of the Tesoro models, produces a single tone audio response.  The older Royal Sabre, Golden Sabre Plus, Pantera and Golden Sabre II had a two-tine audio, but those were older and somewhat larger and heavier than the models produced today.  There were a couple of Golden µMAX units that were supposed to produce four processed tones, but today we mainly have the benefits of single-tone audio in most of Tesoro's newer, lighter-weight detector models.

2) Are the modern Tesoro detectors a throwback to the (good old?) analog days in their response?...  as Steve stated, Tesoro essentially ARE based on an analog circuitry which some of us certainly enjoy.  It makes a great complement to the more modern digitally-based models most of us are using.

That's a pretty vague description/question, I realize.  What annoys me still (yeh, of course I live with it because of all the nicities digital signal processing brings) is that sometimes over large targets I get a short, clean tone (not actually clipped, though) making it sound like a small target when it isn't small at all.  I don't remember analog detectors doing that.... Any detector, with an analog or digital circuitry, will sometimes produce a response on some targets that the operator might otherwise expect to be rejected.  This is caused by several factors, such as the conductivity of the object (and that factors in what it is made of, plus thr size and shape in orientation with the search coil's EMF), and even the size and type of search coil can be a factor.

That said, we see so many of the modern detectors this past several years coming with, or being used with, a Double-D search coil, while most Tesoro models come with, or many of us prefer to use them with, a Concentric search coil.  It is a known rule that Concentric coils deal with iron targets better than a DD coil design, at least in most applications, and that's true with both digital or analog circuitry devices.

My personal opinion is that while an Average Hobbyist might do okay putting less frequent, shorter-duration hunts with just one detector and be satisfied, any savvy Avid Detectorist will likely own and use at least two or more detectors, often having four-or more in their working arsenal.  If so, I think at least one detector ought to be one of the better models Tesoro has offered in the past or currently.  In this case, the Vaquero we're discussing can make a nice complement to some modern Target ID/Tone ID digital type detectors.

Monte

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