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Query About Gold Bug Pro Response To Gold

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I found a .026 gram nugget the other day with the GM1000 in manual 10, if you could call it a nugget? a flake perhaps? I don't know what defines a nugget over a flake.  I used the 10" coil and it banged hard on it with a nice sound, nothing on the gold chance indicator, it was about 10cm down in fine gravel.  I had my GBP with Nel Sharpshooter with me so I ran it over the target before digging to see what it would do, its ground phase dropped right down to around 10 to 12 and made a nice loud sound, nothing showed on the discrimination scale up the top.  I wasn't sure at this point what I had found and didn't understand the ground phase drop on the GBP? I thought it should be 35 to 50 for gold?  Does anyone know why a genuine gold find on the GBP reported a ground phase of 10 or so? Is that normal, should I be hunting looking for ground phase that low? if this is the case I've probably missed a lot of gold as I always ignored signals that were below a ground phase 35 or so, keep in mind where I am hunting there is only tiny gold, all well under a gram.

 

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Ground phase has nothing to do with the nugget - it is a ground mineral reading. You either get a discrimination target id number for strong signals, or a blank for weak signals. The target id number for gold would be in that 35 to 50 range.

http://www.detectorprospector.com/forum/topic/1599-gb-numbers-mineralization/

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Thanks Steve, A wealth of information there, I don't know where I got it from, but from someone told me that the Ground phase is also an indicator of the type of metal you've got a hit on, and when I was swinging over this tiny little nugget in the ground the ground around it was in the 60's for ground phase which is also what the ground balance was set at, but every pass of the nugget dropped the ground phase down to 10 or 11 for a few seconds as it passed the nugget. The Fe304 was reporting nothing but sometimes got 1 bar on some passes and the meter up the top stayed blank at all times, it got no reading at all on the nugget.  The only actual indicator I had of the nugget was the noise beaming out of the speaker (I rarely use headphones) 

I will just read all that info you sent me twice and see if I can make sense of it.  Thanks again

-- after lots of reading I think I am understand now, I still don't quite get why when the speaker went off on my sweeps the exact second the speaker went off the ground phase dropped from 60 or so to 10, the second I passed the target the ground phase went back up to 60+, every sweep as the speaker went off, the ground phase dropped to around 10, as if the ground phase was giving a reading of 10 on the nugget.

I think for me, it's best to just dig everything.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Targets can affect the ground phase reading, but that is unintentional and unpredictable. I have heard of people using it as an additional source of information in order to make a dig or no dig decision, but that is not something I have done myself. Technically to get an accurate ground phase reading you have to pump the coil over the ground.

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So, if you were on the prowl for Gold and you were sweeping away, and got a good target noise from the speaker but nothing at all showing on the top target ID bar you would dig and hope it gets a good target ID as you get closer? I assume there is no target ID as i'm not close enough to the object or the object is too small, it wouldn't make a repeatable sound on the target area if there was nothing there would it so if I hear the sound, it's worth a try digging.  I'm starting to really like using my GBP but it's more complicated than the GM1000.

With the nugget I found with the GM1000 when I eventually found it in the hole I ran the GBP over it again and it got a target ID once it was closer to the coil.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Always dig if there is no target id. Detectors reach deeper than a target id will show, so no target id simple means the detector does not know. The bottom line when learning is look for reasons to dig, not reasons to walk away. As you get more experience with the detector you will get a better feel for when to dig or not. 

If it makes you feel any better I dig huge volumes of junk!

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Thanks Steve, That's going to be my motto from now on, I've got to get my act together and just dig, I'm going to forget discrimination exists for now and just go for gold and dig, dig, dig. 

I guess the reason I was so full of doubt is I can walk along in a straight line and within 20 meters have the detector go off 10+ times, but then again, if I dig up a bucket of gravel in the same area and run it through the sluice it's going to have at least 4 bits of gold in it, more than likely 10 to 20 (super tiny bits) so maybe it's tiny bits of gold setting it off, I just assumed my detector was being too sensitive to the ground or something but the targets repeat if I keep sweeping over them. 

There is surprisingly not much junk in the area so I don't think I'm worried about wasting time digging up junk, I think it was more I was doubting the detector and just thinking it was sounding off on the ground as there was never a target ID on these signals.

We are getting huge amounts of rain at the moment with flooding happening after 30 or so days of high temperatures and no rain at all, I am hoping this is going to flush fresh gold down the creek I hunt in.  I am looking forward to my next visit there after the weather system passes.

 

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One place where the GB-Pro (and many/most other detectors which give live ground-phase readouts) can be used to discriminate with the ground phase reading is the signal from a cold rock (cold stone, negative hot rock,...) because those, by definition, cause the phase to change in the opposite direction compared to metallic targets.

Is that a valuable thing?  Well, cold rocks make a characteristic 'boing' sound which in more detail is a signal-null-signal response as the coil is passed over it.  So if you train your ear for this then you don't need to look at the screen to watch the phase change direction.

Some teachers (including Kevin Hoagland -- check out the video below) actually threaten (and then make good on the promise) to duct tape over a student's detector screen if he catches him looking at it while detecting for gold.  You're supposed to use your ears, exclusively.  That's not to say experts don't use the screen sometimes, but the primary detection technique is audible, not visual.

 

 

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Thanks for that, Just what I needed to hear, the more I use the GBP the more I like it, I'm starting to appreciate the threshold, and I'm starting the miss that the GM1000 doesn't have it.

I'll watch the video you posted, I appreciate it.

 

 

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