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Gerry in Idaho

Can A Guy In 2018 Go To Yuma, Az And Find Gold With A Detector?

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Gerry, it’s always a great time hunting gold with you guys; glad you were able to take a little golden souvenir back home with you. I’m liking the Yuma detector training idea.🤔👍

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Yes I too like coming down to Yuma to hunt gold most areas are not very difficult to get to and when you do go off road for any distance  those roads  are not all that bad either.

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