Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

Recommended Posts


Nice finds. I get excited everytime I find a wheat penny. I sold a 1909 V.D.B. penny for $35 a cpl of years ago. There is something about a wheat penny that reminds me of my childhood when pennies could buy candy

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Those wheats are in great shape Bryan.  It is rare I find one is as good condition as any of those in my area.  I found two wheats yesterday that I could only decipher the 'x94x" on one and the "1x5x " on the other.  I'm with you though.  Yes, wheats are a good indicator for other possible finds, but they are great coins in their own right :).  Good post!!  :) Tim

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This location I hunted yesterday was pretty kind to the Wheats..  One trend that I have noticed is that the older Wheats tend to hold up much better then the ones from the 40s and 50s..  You can see in the bottom photo that a couple of the Wheats in the top row from the mid 40s and the 28 S have some corrosion on them.. 

I figure it’s either a depth factor or coin composition factor.. I tend to lean to the composition of the coin being the difference  since the early Wheats and Indian Head cents have a lower ID then the later Wheats.. 

 Bryan

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Cabin Fever said:

I tend to lean to the composition of the coin being the difference  since the early Wheats and Indian Head cents have a lower ID then the later Wheats.. 

That makes sense.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/12/2018 at 3:34 AM, Cabin Fever said:

The two Semi key date Wheats are probably worth far more then any silver I might have found today so I thought I would show them off.

Absolutely.  Those early mintmarked Lincolns (1915 and earlier) are great finds.  Nice going.

On 4/12/2018 at 1:13 PM, Cabin Fever said:

I figure it’s either a depth factor or coin composition factor.. I tend to lean to the composition of the coin being the difference  since the early Wheats and Indian Head cents have a lower ID then the later Wheats.

Interesting hyphothesis.  Pretty sure all US pennies from late 1864 to early 1982 are 95% copper (with the obvious exception of 1943 zinc coated steel).  However, the last 5% can vary among tin, zinc, or both.  Recent years have been zinc.  Maybe those with tin hold up better.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Those wheat cents are in great shape. Chris Gholson and I just returned from a  productive relic hunt with the 
Nox and recovered a bunch of wheat cents. I haven't even looked at all of mine yet for dates and MMs. After your post I'm gonna go do just that. Thanks!

Dean

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's got to be a soil thing or a fertilizer thing or both. Here are 50 recent wheatback digs from Reno parks. It takes me some work just to read the date on most of them. Something about the soil here is not kind to copper pennies or nickels. Silver comes out of the ground nearly as clean as the day it was dropped thankfully.

Click for larger version...

herschbach-50-wheatback-pennies.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice finds Bryan.

Thanks for sharing.

I look at the wheats like this.

Any one of them could have been a killer silver coin.

Besides the art of detecting, wheats just as hard to find in pounded sites.

David

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

These are my wheats since around August of 2017. Some I can read easy out of the ground but most are just too hard to clean up so I just throw them in here. I have no idea how many are in the glass jar but like TNSS said any one of them could have been a smokin' silver coin. 

IMG_1008.jpg

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

×