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nugget hunter nz

Wholey Sh.t What A Nugget I Got Today With The 24k

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Good on you   what a beauty.

 50/50 mix of muriatic acid and water  let it stay in the mix till you like what you see although i would leave it as is it is lovely as is.

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Wow, what a great find. 

Mike

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Guest AussieDigs

Wow! Well done. Was it a known producing area?

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Well done mate. I guess you'll be searching that area well now. 

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Absolutely fantastic! Those are the ones that keep the dream alive!

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Great find! - but for goodness sake don't acid it - more collectable as it is.

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Wow, WTG, I echo JR, leave as is, it will not be a lone ranger.

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Fantastic! The stuff of dreams. A natural beauty. Given the shape it is not too hard to imagine it getting jammed in a paralley crevice.

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3 hours ago, AussieDigs said:

Wow! Well done. Was it a known producing area?

Nope not at all was just a stab in the dark that payed off 

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