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Ferrite Core Filter On A Coil Cable

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What are peoples thoughts on Ferrite Choke's/Core Filters on coil cables?

I noticed that with my QED detector a Ferrite Filter came with it to clip onto my coil right up the end where it plugs into the control box.  As I have a few coils I clipped one on each of them as I had a few of them laying around, I was a couple short so I'll have to buy some more to do every coil. 

Seeing the QED uses them I was wondering why other detectors don't so I googled images of coils, Well it turns out they do...

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Above is a picture of a CTX 3030 coil, note at the end where the cable plugs into the detector is the Ferrite.

And then the GPZ 7000 also has one, but Minelab did it the better way by putting it on the wires inside the control box.  This method would work better as the wires there aren't already shielded so the ferrite can work its magic better.

9511-0169-2.jpg

Above is the Wiring Loom, C-Box Coil Connector for the GPZ.   This is the perfect method in my opinion, the wires loop around the ferrite to give the best results and there is a shield wire going down onto the connector.  This could possibly be a method the QED could use in future upgrades to give the best results as putting it over an already shielded wire would limit its effectiveness I would think.

The filters probably do a better job at helping prevent EMI out of the detector than coming into it, but it would be interesting to know peoples thoughts on them.

I'm going to order a few more clip on ones to put on my coils I use on the QED anyway as it must need them, these are the ones I'll get, simple clip ons...  5 for $2 ?

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Phrunt the ferrites are a requirement to comply with Australian EMI regulations, and are to restrict emissions from the detector and has nothing to do with emissions entering the detector. Other than the occasional EMI spike from atmospherics, the ferrite has little benefit in the performance of the detector. Might stop someone with a pacemaker nearby from  dropping dead due to interference from your detector though. Just joking. ( I think )

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Thanks Reg, perfect answer... that's what I was thinking too, they'd stop emissions from the detector more than into it.  I just had a bit of hope they help with EMI into a detector too as I was wanting to put one on everything I own ?

 

 

 

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Hi Phrunt. 

I did ask the question of Howard on AEGPF. 

His answer was 

“The ferrites work both ways, reducing transmitted and received EMI. In no way do they reduce detector sensitivity to targets.”  
 
Probably more so transmitted EMI but at least it isn’t adversely affecting anything  ?

 

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3 hours ago, Northeast said:
 
Probably more so transmitted EMI but at least it isn’t adversely affecting anything  ?

except my wallet.

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Hi Phrunt, I have used a ferrite one like you pictured for many years, both on my GPX and now the 7000 (where it's probably overkill). I feel, with no evidence whatsoever, that they are a slight improvement in stability. 

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6 hours ago, klunker said:

except my wallet.

$2 NZD for 5 of 'em? as an Aussie would say, crikey! :laugh:  What's that, about $1.60 American!

I guess with the price of them being so cheap, it can't hurt to run them, if they do nothing its only about 50 cents a coil to have them on.  If they're good enough for Minelab to put on their gear at the factory, they're good enough for me.

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Im certainly no electronic wiz, merely a user, but I wonder what would happen if we were to install multiple ferrite filters on our detectors?  Would it have double the benefits?  If one is good, why not two and so on!  

Have a great one,

Brian.

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2 minutes ago, Nevada Brian said:

I wonder what would happen if we were to install multiple ferrite filters on our detectors?  !  

Your wallet  would b hit multiple times

 

1 hour ago, phrunt said:
7 hours ago, klunker said:

 

$2 NZD for 5 of 'em? as an Aussie would say, crikey! :laugh:  What's that, about $1.60 American!

I could buy a bottle of cheap beer for $1.60 plus the  added benefit of thinking I've found a big nugget when I dig up the bottle cap in five years

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Well, you could spend 10 minutes in a local park with your VLF of choice, find the $2 then buy them.... then the transaction doesn't even need to pass through your wallet ?

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