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I’ve been hunting a good site using the Deus and Equinox which has nails and small iron mixed in with good targets, some good targets being deep, but near or in the iron. My question is, will a GPX with Iron Discrimination turned up and the smallest DD coil pull out the deeper, non-ferrous items amongst heavy iron? Has anyone had any experience with this? I think for shallow targets the Equinox or Deus works better for shallow targets in this “machine gun iron”, but would like to see what others may have insight on for using the GPX. I’m assuming the fast setting and special soil timing may need to be adjusted as well. Thank you in advance.

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I doubt your 5000 can "see" through the iron to get to the goodies.

The discrimination is and always has been questionable on  Minelab PI machines.

let me know how you do...

fred

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I tried out my GPX iron discrimination once using my 10x5" Coiltek Joey, to me it seemed better on big iron, little targets was a different story.  I don't think it's going to serve your purpose well.

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Heading into ferrous with a PI is not for the faint of heart because no matter what you do you will dig a lot of trash. Since you have a GPX however there is no harm in giving it a go.

 

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Thanks all.  I’ll give it a go and see.

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Jason, Your scenario is probably the toughest scenario for any PI. If you have the small Minelab coil (5x10?) DD or any DD small coil, use that. I would also start with a very low gain of 5 to narrow the signal a bit. Very slow, short sweeps. I would start with an iron disc of 5 to be safe. If you are looking for coins and not nuggets, then 8 or 9. But be careful, non ferrous targets close to the surface will mimic an iron blanking (kind of). I think low gain and very slow coil control will be your best bet. Let us know how it goes.

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Just now, schoolofhardNox said:

Jason, Your scenario is probably the toughest scenario for any PI. If you have the small Minelab coil (5x10?) DD or any DD small coil, use that. I would also start with a very low gain of 5 to narrow the signal a bit. Very slow, short sweeps. I would start with an iron disc of 5 to be safe. If you are looking for coins and not nuggets, then 8 or 9. But be careful, non ferrous targets close to the surface will mimic an iron blanking (kind of). I think low gain and very slow coil control will be your best bet. Let us know how it goes.

Awesome advice, thank you!  I have the 5x10 DD and an 8” round DD Coiltek and the Platypus coil (among others) but those have the smallest footprint.

 

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