Jump to content
Jin

How Far Would You Go To Find Gold?

Recommended Posts

I read a lot of old mining reports or literature relating to the 1850"s - 1870"s when most of the better gold was won. Sometimes I come across information that is really exciting as you know with cross referencing little was mentioned elsewhere about these finds (nuggets - big nuggets!!) So hopefully few people if any have prospected there.

The only problem is these areas are often almost impenetrable. There either so steep you can barely walk or so over grown trying to get into the area is almost impossible. My biggest fear in these situations is not getting lost but getting bitten by a snake many miles from help. Some of the tiger snakes here even climb trees or lay in the ferns at head height. Which only leaves the winter time to venture in. however during winter the snow is likely going to be a problem. It's really a month or two window of opportunity each year were you have a chance at getting in. 

Anyway I've got one gully id like to try (many miles away from any gold workings/activity) but im pretty sure its overgrown with blackberries. I recon it would take a a good mile to even get into this gully from a nearby road. Not to mention hacking away at the blackberries with a machete.

Ive located several areas like this and usually wait for a bush fire or controlled burn to clear the spot but sometimes this dosnt happen. 

It almost feels like one has to start looking in areas like this where most rational folk would dare to venture to find areas that haven't had lots of attention these days. Sometimes i wish id chosen another hobby, lol

(Note: I carry a PLB, two way radio, mobile, snake bite kit, lighter, whistle, compass, 2 ltrs water, GPS & spare batteries and sometimes a lever action shotgun for wild dogs. I always communicate exactly where im going and have regular check ins.)  

 

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Boy I can't even answer. I wouldn't think twice, but we don't have so many creepy crawlies that can kill me. About all we have in Idaho is rattlesnakes and those are easy to avoid. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just did some research. The chance of dying by snakebite in Australia is only about twice the chance in the US. And most in both are people intentionally messing with snakes. I'd just go for it. If it really sucks you can always bail before it gets too bad.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes it would be good if all our snakes over here rattled a warning sound if you got to close.

Just spent 3 weeks in Canada and Alaska and after seeing 20 odd bears on the trip I reckon bears or cougars would worry me more. Imagine detecting and a bear comes up behind you. Certainly wouldn't detect with headphones there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nah, bears and cougars are easy. Unless you get a crazy one they avoid or ignore you. Your far more likely to run into a crazy person in town than you are a crazy animal out in the wilds.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest AussieDigs

Youd just have to way up the worth the effort through such hospitable terrain against the probability of a strike (gold not snake). Thats your call. Yes ive come across a Tiger snake as head height in a tree out the north side of Mitta Mitta! Not nice. Snow? It must be at elevation! Still, those that venture beyond where most scout have the potential to be rewarded.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jin, your comment of detecting and a bear comes up behind you actually happened to me last year. I was detecting on a creek that dried up and I kept hearing something over behind me to my right side and 3 times I pulled the headphones off and looked back to see what it was. Never saw or heard anything, went back to detecting and I heard it again. Nothing across the creek but something moving on my side of the creek caught my eye. It was a large black bear coming towards me about 75-95 feet roughly away from me. I thought oh crap, all I have with me is my pick and rock hammer for defence. I decided to just stay put and see what happens. The bear looked over in my direction, sniffed the air and turned and went away. I'd be way more scared of snakes. I walked into a snake den in fall and one rattleing next to my left foot and almost stepped on 6-7 baby rattlesnakes. This scared the living crap right out of me. I couldn't stop shaking. Snakes bother me more.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In the Summer the plain old brown snake is the worst in Gippsland as they are more likely to be aggressive than a tiger snake.Some of the most poisonous are in WA but in the outback but the ground cover is less and they are shy and get out of the way. In the late 1970s I had 2 occasions of a Black Snake  and 1 occasion of a Tiger Snake in the water with me while Dredging for gold. The closest to being bitten was when I was bush walking and a Tiger hit my Scarpa Boot since then I all keep a good eye on the sunny side of the track. How far would I go for GOLD is more limited to Distance or Time not Wild life or Terrain.:wink: 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was always under the impression that Tigers where more aggressive in the summer and browns in the spring. Something to do with their mating/breading season. The last encounter i had with a brown was at the Laanecoorie caravan park when a baby brown shot past my thongs at high speed. Beautiful creature it was.

Good to know that bears dont go around eating people Goldseeker as I have been invited to go back to Canada for some prospecting by someone i met over there.Thinking a 6 month trip might be in order in a couple of years. My mate says head up to Barkerville for some nice nuggets.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Similar Content

    • By Gold Catcher
      Guys, I would be interested to hear your thoughts on the following: Old wisdom says that gold can be found where it has been found before by others. Following this "rule", I have mostly been hunting in areas that are well known for their gold deposits and that have been heavily mined by others. This has worked well for me and I have found decent gold over the years (although I always could use some more...;). However, lately I am more and more playing with the thought to explore areas where there are no known gold deposits recorded. Here in California there are many areas that are not explored by others that have the potential for gold. I am trying to locate these areas by for instance comparing the geological maps with those maps of known deposits. By inspecting these maps I sometimes see geological formations on public land that are virtually identical to those where gold mines are located, but they have never been mined or claimed before. This happens more often in desert areas where there is a lack of water and perhaps therefore the old timers where not all over it. I am sure this is not typical for California and the same potential for "undiscovered" bonanzas exist all over the world. So, what  do you guys think about such adventurous new places? I would hate to be skunked every day for weeks and months while exploring potential new areas, but I can't help the thought that it is nearly impossible for the old timers to have caught every single gold bearing area. 
    • By Jesse
      I'm relatively new to metal detecting tailings, my experience is more with bedrock. I've found several spots close by that are old historical mining sites. My problem is I don't know what to look for, do you go to the big cobbles or smaller rocks? I've attached a few pictures hopefully they make sense. Thank you in advance.


    • By phrunt
      I am after some advice, I purchased a GPZ 7000 late yesterday and of course I am keen to take it out today for a test drive.  I am pretty clueless with this machine, although I've watched JW use it many times I've not paid any attention to how he runs it or what he does with it as I never thought I'd be buying one.  I think his settings may not be ideal for me yet anyway as he runs it crazy hot, being a beginner I'd probably need more tame stable settings 🙂
      JW is unable to be contacted this weekend, Queenstown's big music festival of the year which JW always attends going on for the weekend so he's off at that so I can't get any advice off him for my mission today.
      I was hoping GPZ users here would be able to give me some advice on what to do.    I don't have time to properly read the manual today as I've got a big drive to get to a gold spot, I was thinking I'd just do a quick start and get going but if there is something obvious I should be doing to use it in mild soils please let me know.  If the default settings are more suitable for tough soils I'd be wasting my time.  I'll have to start reading the manual tonight after I've used it today 🙂
      I've ordered a 10" and 12" X-coil for it which I believe to be the best two coils for use in NZ with JW's results.  I'm also going to use the Chet method of a longer style adapter patch cable for it, I like the idea of his method and it also makes changing coils easier which I like the idea of. 
      Here's my new toy.

      Any help greatly appreciated.
    • By Tnsharpshooter
      So the actual detector’s battery has gotten some attention here.  Btw I still don’t see battery listed yet on parts list at Minelab.com.  Anyway thinking long term here what about changing batteries in the wireless WM 08 module.
       
    • By JohnnyRox
      Which do you think will hit deeper on wet sand?  I'd prefer a TDIBH over a DF but I'm budget limited.  
    • By Trent King
      Hi all,
      Does anyone know anything about this little beauty?  A mate of mine bought it brand new a long time ago and found it when cleaning out the shed.
       

×
×
  • Create New...