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Propjob

Question On Beach Hunting After Storm

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Hit a small local beach this morning around low tide. Had heavy thunder storms and decided to see what might have been deposited. Using an Equinox800. This side of the beach typically for the last year has been encumbered by seaweed. So not many bathers. But it being NE, I figured maybe something had been made detectable. All I found were a couple of rusted metal spots, which funny, did not sound like iron with no discrimination. In the pools, using Beach 2 had several targets that showed 12-11. but couldn't recover Also showed with handpointer. Weird day! For those that have had more experience beach hunting, I noticed that the beach a striations in the sand and a few pools of water which I attempted. Sand was some what firm, not black . I will try to attach a couple of photos to get your opinions I usually have been a ground type detectorist and started beach hunting last year. Not good yet at reading the beach

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Low spots can be great holding areas for heavy targets.  If the sand in or around them is soft, expect light targets (pulltabs).  I seem to do well just outside of a pool for some odd reason.  Going off of your pictures, I'd hit around the rocks as much as possible.  If they aren't sinking then jewelry & coins won't go far down either.

Good Luck!

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Thanks Sting Ray.  I am thinking that most of the items on this side of the beach would be debris from old vessels.  The beach use to be covered in thick sea weed and stinks.  So few bathers here.  On the other side of the jetty it’s more a sunning and bathing area. The opportunity was there after the storm.  I am curious what the striating in the sand tell me. Not sure if it was the rough surf, or wind?  But they are all running  the same like little dunes.

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10 hours ago, Propjob said:

The beach use to be covered in thick sea weed and stinks.  So few bathers here.

Today, but how confident are you that it's always been this unattractive?  East coast US?  You've got 300-400 years of potential loss-of-valuable metal.  I'm not a beach hunter but I've been amazed at the old items I've found in places I thought were only recently visited/occupied (and how wrong I was).

 

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Propjob

I hunt different beaches than yours but I'll give my take on the matter.  I did grow up in Northeast Florida and have hunted many Florida beaches but now I'm on the West Coast.

When hunting a beach you typically need more than a thunderstorm to change it.  You need more ENERGY to change a beach.  This energy is from tides and waves.  This is what will move your targets to a location where you can find them.  If you are hunting a beach with few waves and little current/tides then you need to go out to where the objects have been lost.  They will not come to you on the beach.  This is often times the way of a freshwater beach/swimming hole also.

As was noted, you have had hundreds of years for objects to be deposited.  This is a good thing if you are finding a place where no one has detected before.  I typically hunt on beaches with large parking lots that have had many years of losses but also get new losses each season.  When our storms come in with larger waves for days at a time the storms will pick up these targets and move them.  We spend our time looking for these pockets.

Your area looks to be both relic and beach detecting which means you could have some really nice finds but there may be fewer good targets.  Be patient and you'll find what the beach has to offer.

Do a little research about that beach and find out what people did in the past 100-200 years.  There may have been a gathering spot or old beach house that would have targets from house to beach.  Ask permission when possible and the locals may give you some clues and history.

There are many things to consider and these are just a few.  You may need to change your beach!

Good luck.

Mitchel

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