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Gerry in Idaho

Yank's Trip Down Under & Success Or Failure

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Fantastic photos Gerry and great story ?

I always liked that 15x12 Commander but used to complain about how heavy it was, but I dare say if I were to use it today, compared to the 7000, I wouldn`t even notice the coil was there.    Dave

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Cool Gerry, thanks for sharing. Thanks for the perspective, we all should keep that in mind.

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Great pictures!

 I have to ask, did you make an omelet with those Emu eggs?

fred

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Guest AussieDigs

Gerry, this is a “pastie” but with ‘dead horse’!

50CC56E4-0788-4A23-9317-1AA957AD5762.jpeg

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Ah, an edible pastie ... I kinda remember those days ... Great story and pics of your far and away adventure Gerry.

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Awesome Gerry. Thanks for the trip. I don't need to go now.? 

Best of luck out there

JW ?

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Gerry I was in the area 2006, with a couple years experience up my sleeve I cracked 32 oz for the winter. You did quite good for your first trip. I had three Yanks in my van begging to buy some nice size nuggets (2 oz in total) at a 25% above spot price. They convinced me to sell as they wanted something to show that their trip paid.  By the way one Emu egg make enough for four hungry Men. 

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Gerry, (and Condor)

Absolutely great story telling images fella.  Thanks for sharing it all... 

You, your team and more recently - Condor have painted the most believably and real stories about trying to make a strike in this challenging land.  Luck is always a component, but as 1st timer Yanks, even skilled Yanks, still have a lot to learn without an equally skilled local guide.  Even then, it takes a bunch of time, research and connections to dive into this activity in that terrific land of mineral promise.

Even JP, with his volumes of local knowledge, having grown up there, and with connections, must have difficulties filling his poke from time to time in these beaten-to-death lands.  It appears your skills have served you all very well against incredible odds in the relatively short time frames you had there.  Envious Kudos!

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Great pictures and story! There are some weird-ass critters there, that’s for sure!?

p.s. and I didn’t mean you guys lol?

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