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I can't help but notice over the Internet and the various metal detecting forums that I explored today there is very little current talk on many detectors, everyone seems to focus on a small few.  Maybe I'm a little bit odd (probably) but I like using multiple detectors, I like learning them and finding out the differences in performance or in a lot of cases the lack thereof. 

Today I went for a bit of a detect between the weather and my detector of choice was my Euroace (Ace350) with Nel Tornado coil, a long way from my best detector according to general consensus, however I think it's a mighty good detector and I like using it for a nice easy relaxing coin hunt, it does well at it. 

I found a bunch of coins, all modern and enough to buy a decent lunch 🙂 I doubt if I tried I could find any current discussion on the Ace detectors.  It's hard enough to find any current talk on the Fisher detectors or my beloved T2, everything I read on them is many years old even though they're still sold as current models.  It makes me question if anyone is even buying these detectors anymore or using them, everything First Texas is selling is many years old, it's mostly the same with all the US manufacturers and their range. 

I doubt the dealers on here will be wanting to disclose their sales figures or even say if they can move stock of these detectors anymore but I'd love if they would.

I have a few questions I'd like people to answer.

1) What detectors you have purchased in the past couple of years?

2) Where you happy with your purchase(s)?

3) Have you had to do a warranty claim on it, how'd that go?

4) If you had your time again would you still buy those detectors or do you regret it?

5) Do you still use any of your other detectors, if so why?

last but not least......

6) Your favourite detector of all time

Thanks 🙂

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Thought you were going for a gold hunt today. What happened?

My favourite detector is the GPZ 7000. Hands down.👍 Of course I am talking for gold & not coin.

JW 🤠

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Just now, kiwijw said:

Thought you were going for a gold hunt today. What happened?

I ended up not having a car 🙂 Figured I'd save it for the weekend anyway, don't want to take all the gold.

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Bugger. I was hoping you would scope it out & put me on the gold. :biggrin:

JW 🤠

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Might take the SDC 2300 if it is going to involve detecting in water.

JW

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1 hour ago, phrunt said:

 

I have a few questions I'd like people to answer.

1) What detectors you have purchased in the past couple of years?

2) Where you happy with your purchase(s)?

3) Have you had to do a warranty claim on it, how'd that go?

4) If you had your time again would you still buy those detectors or do you regret it?

5) Do you still use any of your other detectors, if so why?

last but not least......

6) Your favourite detector of all time

🙂

A.1:  started of with a ML GP extreeme (2005), then a ML GPX 4000 when they came out, then shortly after that a ML GPX 4500 times two, then a GPZ 7000 when they first came out, and recently a 2nd GPZ 7000 and somewhere in between was a SDC 2300, and also tried a Whites GMT for a short while.

A.2: Yes happy with most of them, the GPX4000 was a bit disappointing, and the GMT was good on hot rocks here in WA so it didn't last long.

A.3: No warranty claims on actual detectors, some of the ML 11" mono coils failed and were replaced under warranty, and one of the GPX4500 batteries failed and was replaced under warranty.

A.4: Yes, for the GPX 4500's and the SDC2300 and the GPZ7000's

A.5: Only kept one GPX4500 as a backup and the SDC2300 for the same reason.

A.6: Without a shadow of a doubt the GPZ7000 wins hands down, and now with the X-Coils attached it's at another level like I have never seen before, Ok I might be a bit bias on the X-Coils, but it is true, seeing is believing as they say.

cheers dave 

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1) What detectors you have purchased in the past couple of years?

     In order of purchase:  Garrett AT Gold, White's TDI SL SE, Minelab GPX 5000 and Gold Monster 1000.

2) Where you happy with your purchase(s)?

    Yes.  I got the AT Gold because I thought I would like coin and relic more and as a first detector I did not want to invest a ton of money and find out I did not like detecting.  Well I did like it and quickly found out I loved nugget shooting and prospecting so I got the TDI SL SE.  It handles mineralization so much better than VLF's and I really liked not digging so many "ghost" targets and hot rocks.  The GPX was used and a deal I could not pass up, my son uses and loves it.  This year I got the Monster and am having a blast finding lots of small gold.  

3) Have you had to do a warranty claim on it, how'd that go?

     Yes, the Monster had an issue so I contacted Minelab and they took care of me.  I'm very happy with their service.

4) If you had your time again would you still buy those detectors or do you regret it?

     No regrets, each purchase served a purpose.  If I had known how much I was going to like prospecting/nugget shooting I might have skipped the AT Gold but it served its purpose and I don't regret getting it.

5) Do you still use any of your other detectors, if so why?

     I sold the AT Gold to help fund the Gold Monster purchase so no to it but I do still use the TDI SL.  If I could pry the GPX out of my son's grasp I would use it too lol.

6) Your favourite detector of all time?

     In my opinion each detector I own has an area it is better than the others in, so my favorite is the one that best fits what I need to do in that particular area.  Right now the area I'm in it is small gold in medium soil, so the Monster is getting the most use.

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Simon - if you posted this in the detector info and comparisons forum you might get input from a more diverse base of detectorists.  From beach detectorists, to Coin shooters to relic hunters to meteorite hounds.  FWIW.

For me:

Bounty Hunter to Tek Delta to AT Pro to Deus to Excal II to ATX to T2 to F75 to MX Sport/MXT to GPX 4800 to  Equinox to ORX.    Only the Equinox and ORX was purchased in the last couple of years and some advanced coils for Deus.

Deus(ORX)/Equinox/GPX are my top 3.  Hard to choose between Deus or Equinox as fav for all time.  I keep F75 and MXT around if I need concentric coil capability or as backups for friends who tag along  and ATX backs up my GPX when it is really wet and muddy.   Everything else save for my Tek Delta which I really learned detecting on are gone.  

I only regret owning the AT Pro, MX Sport and Excal II.  The T2 was simply redundant to the F75 without concentric Coil capability.  Everything else, no regrets.

Relic hunting is number 1 for me followed by beach detecting and Coin shooting.

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13 hours ago, phrunt said:

1) What detectors you have purchased in the past couple of years?  Makro Gold Racer, Vallon 

2) Where you happy with your purchase(s)?YES

3) Have you had to do a warranty claim on it, how'd that go?Yes, Dunked power module and Makro replaced it.

4) If you had your time again would you still buy those detectors or do you regret it? Yes, although there are current models I would prefer.

5) Do you still use any of your other detectors, if so why? NO

last but not least......

6) Your favourite detector of all time:  Gold Racer

Thanks 🙂

 

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1) What detectors you have purchased in the past couple of years?  26 months ago -- Fisher F75 Black (currently 4 coils).  17 months ago -- Minelab Equinox 800 (presently all three available coils).  9 months ago -- used Tesoro Vaquero (currently 2 coils).

2) Were you happy with your purchase(s)?  Yes.  The Vaquero was a kind of nostalgia acquisition since I felt I missed out on the analog era.

3) Have you had to do a warranty claim on it, how'd that go?  None of the above three, yet.

4) If you had your time again would you still buy those detectors or do you regret it?  F75 and Eqx 800 -- no regrets.  My limited experience with the Vaquero makes me think I didn't add any capabilities to my collection (see bar at left) but it did appease my desire for the analog era detectors.  I've thought about getting a Fisher CZ or White's (many choices) vintage detector for the same nostalgic reason but combine the older tech with concentric coils (which don't seem to mesh with me) and that desire has subsided.

5) Do you still use any of your other detectors, if so why?  Eqx 800 has been my go-to IB detector with the F75 still a serious producer.  I'll request that the Fisher Gold Bug Pro go in my casket and be buried with me -- it's like the first family pet that will always be close to my heart (and it still performs).  The X-Terra 705 produced but I never really felt comfortable with it due to the iron wraparound.  The TDI-SPP is my only PI so it serves its purpose decently when an IB isn't the optimal performer.

6) Your favourite detector of all time.  Kinda varies by day, but all-around (especially ergonomics but also its depth performance and easy to navigate interface) the F75 black is hard to beat.  The Eqx 800 has lost my confidence recently (see my EMI thread) but I'm not giving up on it by a long shot.  I'm currently in major testing mode with all my detectors, with special emphasis on the Eqx 800.  I'll figure things out one way or the other.

7) What's your next detector?  TBD, but like Steve H. I'm badly wanting a lightweight, affordable, high performance PI.  If the QED becomes available and serviceable in the US it's a serious contender.  Hopefully so will the Fisher Terra Manta (if it makes it to market).  I always have my eye open for Nokta/Makro to come out with a PI that meets the above properties.

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