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3 hours ago, pinpointa said:

Hi Guys,

How many detector brands have Mixed Mode.  Thanks in advance.

 

If by mixed mode you mean true all metal audio simultaneously combined with discriminated audio and/or visual ID,  probably about 5 or 6 brands have mixed mode models.  In other words most of the Top brands have at least one VLF mixed mode detector.  Whites probably has the most models with it (including the V3i, MXT, abd DFX), Garrett has at least one (AT Gold), First Texas (Fisher F75 and Teknetics(see below)), and Nautilus.  That includes brands that have audio mixed mode and those that have all metal audio and discriminated vdi.  If you want to know more than just how many brands have it and a more detailed breakdown by Steve then read this article.  Things haven't changed much since Steve wrote that article, but some additional detectors not mentioned in that article that have True and Pseudo mixed mode include the Teknetics T2 (similar to the F75), Teknetics Omega 8500, XP Deus (Gold Field mode), and Minelab Equinox Gold Mode with Disc off (the last two are debatable, I suppose).  Not sure about Nokta/Makro, but they likely have it in their latest models.

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....Count RUTUS detectors and AKA detectors that also work in MIX MODE with these detectors,,,

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Tarsacci MDT 8000 has mixed mode.

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Whites MX Sport and MX7 have Relic mode which is a mixed mode.

 

Jeff

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The typical definition of Mixed Mode is All Metal audio and Disc mode audio working simultaneously.   

I don't think of All Metal with TID as being mixed mode, although I guess you could call it that.   I don't define it that way though and most other folks wound't either when they hear the term, Mixed Mode.

The only ones I'm personally familiar with are Whites (DFX, V3, V3i) and Rutus (Alter71)

I like chasing the bumble bee.  :wacko:

HH
Mike

 

 

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AT Max has mixed mode also.

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9 hours ago, Mike Hillis said:

The typical definition of Mixed Mode is All Metal audio and Disc mode audio working simultaneously.   

I don't think of All Metal with TID as being mixed mode, although I guess you could call it that.   I don't define it that way though and most other folks wound't either when they hear the term, Mixed Mode.

The only ones I'm personally familiar with are Whites (DFX, V3, V3i) and Rutus (Alter71)

I like chasing the bumble bee.  :wacko:

HH
Mike

 

 

Understood.  It is addressed as an alternative implementation in Steve’s article on the subject of mixed mode, which I linked to so I covered it that way in my response for completeness.  Understand there are varied opinions as to whether or not some  consider that implementation mixed mode.  I think all that matters to those who care about the feature is to simply understand whether it is implemented solely in audio (the more “typical” or traditional sense) or as AM mixed with discriminated visual TID and choose the detector that has implementation that works best for them.

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I like running mixed mode with 3 frequency Correlate on my V3.   I get to hear everything in the ground in the all metal channel but only hear the targets that correlate in the Disc mode.  

Another way I like Mixed mode is to reject the targets I'm after so that that they are only reported by the all metal channel.....reverse mixed mode is how its referred to I think.   

Mixed mode is very handy sometimes.   I wish more models offered it.   Sure you can hunt in the AM mode of the F75 but you have to watch the screen.   With an audio mixed mode you do it all by ear.

HH
Mike

 

 

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