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eagleseye

Aftermarket Shafts For In Water Use

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Hello everybody,

can I use the Golden Mask Shaft (converted for the Equinox) in salt water?
Are there metallic parts that will be corroded / oxidized by being submerged in ocean/sea ?

Thanks

Editor's Note - this thread was split from an older existing thread about the Golden Mask aftermarket rod

golden-mask-universal-metal-detector-rod-assembly.jpg

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I don’t think the Golden Mask rod would be a good candidate for in water use. It is basically the leg off a camera tripod, with fairly snug oring type shaft cams. I would hate to get fine sand and grit into those cams or the rod assembly itself. I am guessing a high probability of cam issues and shaft locking.

The lower most rod section has a very minimal amount of flex when fully extended. Not really an issue for above water use but flexing might become more an issue pushing a coil through the water.

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Thanks Steve, do you think Detect ED shaft might be functional for under water operation ? if not have you got any ideas on how to compact down this big boy for scuba use and / or be tucked in a backpack?

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Better question for those who have handled or seen a Detect ED shaft in person, which I have not. I have one of steveg’s two piece rods that I intend on using for my in water detecting with the Equinox.

Another review here

 

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I would say yes, the Detect Ed shaft is perfect for underwater use.  It's very sturdy and also has a neat little drain hole at the bottom to let any water out. 

I believe Ed is a regular water hunter and one of the reasons he made the shaft is he needed a better shaft for water hunting as the stock shaft didn't cut it.

67486226_357318778513075_8808147962797290586_n.thumb.jpg.6b81ed8f32f3ad210d00b4842283e936.jpg

This is a capture of Ed's page showing he's a water hunter :laugh:

IMG_20190906_110915.jpg.dff2c0d106d9f40deac8cd1e7a876725.jpg
 

He's the neat little drain hole, it works well, I had my detector dunked in my Spa overnight using it, I could see the water coming out the little hole.  You'll also see the little gap between my shaft and the coil ears due to Ed's new washers to prevent coil ear wear.

IMG_20190906_110927.jpg.71437aca4bcf214493e49744f3913979.jpg

The locking mechanism on it is tough and makes a strong connection between the two lengths of shaft.

I doubt a water hunter would be disappointed in it.

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Thanks Phrint for the detail on the drain hole, I saw on their website that the shaft is good for underwater operations although it stays LONG when shrinked for transport use since it's a 2 pieces shaft rather than a 3 pieces (shorter) one and finding a backpack for the stock version is a pain.

The opportunity to have a shorter shaft implies also that you can swing it while scuba diving with your right hand while picking up the targets with ease with your left hand: on a 2 piece shaft, the distance of the coil from the left reaching hand is too large to be considered comfortable, do you know (and Steve) other 3 pieces alternatives ?

Thanks guys for your support!

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I felt it went small enough, in saying that I'm not a scuba hunter....

IMG_20190906_114806.jpg.3a96c915913e4613515f3d46b64569e6.jpg

This maybe an option, it goes tiny.

 

 

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Phrunt awesome advice! Never heard about this UK based company!

I asked them if it can be used for scuba diving in salty water.

I'll keep you posted in the mean time here are a couple of links about them that I found:

Ecommerce (discount code that could work for a 5% "MDF4895" found on a youtube video):

https://www.detecting-innovations.co.uk/TELE-KNOX_Detecting-Innovations_Telescopic_Stem/p6292256_19741720.aspx

 

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I have one of the Tele-Nox rods pictured above. If I had to choose again between the Tele-Nox and Golden Mask (now available Equinox ready) I would pick the Tele-Nox by a hair. Both rods are fine but I like the Tele-Nox a little better, mainly due to the channel design keeping things aligned and a slightly stouter lower rod.

I have a lot of experience using the Garrett ATX with three piece telescoping rod in the water. It is 10 times stronger than either of these rods and it requires great care and constant cleaning to keep it from locking up. I do not consider either the Golden Mask or the Tele-Nox to be a rod I would use in the water, unless I absolutely had to. I think they would prove to be a service pain in the posterior due to too many moving parts. I also do not find either rod suitable for use with the 15" coil due to the extra strain the larger coil puts on these rods, leading to flexing in the thin lower rods and possible torque related twisting.

Both these rods are great for mountain type rucksack hiking using the stock or 6" coil.

For water use I prefer a two piece rod for stoutness and durability. I am pretty sure both the Steve's Rod and Detect-Ed are good options. I favor Steve's since he is an active forum member! :smile: However, two piece rods can be too long for ease of travel/packing in a suitcase.

So unlike some people I am actually just fine with the stock rod as a three piece option both for travel and in water use. It’s inexpensive enough to be a “sacrificial option”. I just don't think for me personally there is a one rod for everything solution that is perfect, and the stock rod as a general purpose option suits me just fine, with either telescoping or two piece rods for niche/specialty uses.

Just my thoughts/opinions.

 

Minelab Equinox Shaft Assembly 3011-0400

A317C537-78F1-45C2-97F3-F90CA3ABB98A.jpeg

 

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eagleseye --

My shafts have already been mentioned in this thread by Steve H., but you seem to be looking for more collapsibility, so I wanted to let you know that I also offer a three-piece all-carbon-fiber shaft option -- I can custom-build it for you, if you need it to collapse small enough to fit in a specific-sized bag, but my "standard" option keeps all three shaft sections at 21" or less.  The connections between the three sections are achieved with two of my heavy duty, highly secure clamp-type cam locks.  I also offer the "drain hole" in the lower rod, as an option for anyone who would like to have one.  Finally, I can offer you the shaft in standard black, or an array of colors, if you have interest in a colored shaft.  Just another option for you to consider.  Please contact me, if you would like additional information, as I'd love the chance to build you a shaft (email steve@stevesdetectorrods.com).

Steve

www.stevesdetectorrods.com

www.facebook.com/stevesdetectorrods

 

RyanShaftAssembled.jpg

RyanShaftDisassembled.jpg

SilverShaftattheBeach.jpg

redblack1.jpg

redblack2.jpg

colored-tubes.jpg

camlockleft-50.jpg

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