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I concur completely with your operation method with the GPZ, especially using the GPS and tracking. Although I leave the GPS off on the GPZ and use a smart phone and Oziexplorer. Although Bogenes settings are coming up with the goods on researching also.

On those isolated nugget finds, they are a mystery, but sometimes with the use of GPS tracking and coming back with newer technology, the mystery is solved. I have returned to some such locations this year so far and have been fortunate to solve two of them with broken down reefs up hill that were beyond the capabilities of earlier detectors. The GPZ is amazing in its depth capability on sub gram pieces in locations where through high grass or surface rocks, you have no choice but have the coil a couple of inches off the ground, which is the "norm" for my area. But with, I assume, placer(alluvial) gold as it seems yours is mainly, tis a different challenge than our reefs, elluvial and alluvial. In my area the PI to GPZ  tech gain is proving to be as productive as the VLF to PI gain.

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I have had separate GPS units and still do, but find using the GPZ map screen as my main hunt screen to work better for me. The screen and current hunt are just right there in front of my face so I can see gaps in my coverage as they develop. I can reload a previous hunt map and work off it. Having a built in method for recording a nugget find location, weight, and depth are also handy. Far from perfect but having it as my main hunt screen makes it compelling for me. I eyeball and use landmarks and boot scrapes to get the best coverage I can but it is easy in some ground to go astray and the screen alerts me to double back and give a missed spot proper coverage before moving on. There is no having to watch a separate GPS screen; it is just right there in front of me at all times.

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Thanks for the great update, Steve. Your pictures are really good. You are certainly perfecting the art of taking pictures of gold. Which, I am finding is not as easy as point and shoot with your cell phone. Good work.

Dean

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Great post, nice pictures

 How much detecting time will you lose, if using the the GPS  full time?

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Very nice. I have some similar methods of detecting places that are here in northern cal. I also have found those lone pieces of gold. Usually pretty decent size. Then I figure I found a missed patch only after gridding with my pick marks on the ground technique that there was no more gold. Then I wonder the same thing why? Sometimes I actually wonder if it was a dropped piece from an old timer miner passing thru to known nearby diggings. Maybe his poke had a hole in it. Maybe he was chased by indians or a grizzly. Every piece of gold you find waited all this time for you to come and find it. But it is more exciting to find a patch that the whole gold rush missed. Especially a pocket deposit. Then you feel like cristopher columbus discovering the new America or that your the first human to set foot where you found the gold.

Once again hats off to your dedication , persistence, and your gold finds

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Steve I`d use the GPZ GPS too because as you point out its there and visible, but without the capability to access my 20 years of tracks & waypoints, it serves little use. Once and if Minelab addresses this and allows importing of such data, then it will be the way for me. My old data is what puts me onto those "mystery piece" patches.

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Great post, nice pictures

How much detecting time will you lose, if using the the GPS full time?

In my case none. The battery gets me through a long day GPS off or GPS always on. I never turn the GPS off now.

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G'day Steve

 

After reading your post about using the GPS and map screen yesterday I decided to give it a try, I liked it.  Instead of randomly wandering about you can see at a glance where you have been, and mark in the gold finds as well.

 

I found after the first try when I turned the machine off it lost the trail, well I found the button to save the trail after smoko :) and then after lunch I found the button to go to the end of the saved Geo hunt as well :) by the end of the day I had a good size area of the screen covered in trail and finds :)

 

Thankyou for posting about this feature of the 7000, as to begin with, and having never bothered using it, I just thought it was a gimmick, now I see its benefit. 

 

cheers dave

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GPS`s are definitely no gimmick when it comes to gold prospecting, tracks and waypoints saved over the years turn into a powerful tool, as new tech detectors are developed. Imagine the GPZ screen showing an actual map of area you are prospecting, topo, geo or combination of both. Gold detectors and GPS devices belong together, a great move by Minelab I certainly hope they develop it further.

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