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ColonelDan

My Observations Of Eqx Update 2.0.1 And Iron Bias F2 At Daytona Beach

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As promised, below are my observations of the Equinox update 2.0.1 with concentration on Iron Bias F2 when used on Daytona Beach.  Emphasis is on “MY”observations.  These are mine and mine alone.  You’re observations could very well differ depending on your beach...they’re all somewhat unique.

The beach I hunted was at the Bahama House Hotel in Daytona Beach Shores.  The conditions were sanded in but I did hit it at low tide.  I can’t speak to or test in an environment that some characterize as a “bed of nails”  since we don’t really see such conditions on our beaches.  The junk we routinely have that causes detector problems is bottle caps from a variety of manufacturers, pull tabs, can slaw and aluminum foil with a few tent stakes thrown in now and again.

Primarily I wanted to observe the 2.0.1/F2 function based on detected targets found at an actual beach using various 2.0/F2 settings vs the 1.7.5 FE iron bias function.  You’ll not find any “scientific data” here as these are just my subjective observations….as was always the objective.

Bottom Line Up Front: As fully expected, update 2.0.1 F2 is better at identifying various forms of “junk” alloy than 1.7.5 FE in this beach environment.

Observations:

1. The signals I got from a variety of bottle caps not surprisingly differed depending on the metallurgical composition.  Not all bottle caps are the same although they ring up as junk if they aren’t 100% aluminum.  Some have more aluminum than others while others have more ferrous material.   Success in identifying those signals ranged from “no doubt junk” to “no doubt good targets.”  The all aluminum twist off caps for example still ring up solidly as good targets...same with the ever present pull tab but I have to dig them or risk missing out on gold.  

2.  I once again confirmed the importance of properly “dialing in” the settings appropriate to the environment.   The relationship between sensitivity, recovery speed and F2 made a big difference.    I found that a lower sensitivity (13-18) was best when paired with a recovery speed of around 3-4 and an F2 setting of between 5-7.  Those were the “sweet spots” for me that day at that beach.   Anything lower on the F2 scale than 5 the more the targets sounded like “dig me” targets.  Anything above 7 and I sensed a potential masking issue. Again, just what I saw that day in an environment that had significant EMI I might add.  The sweet spots will differ when EMI is not as much of a problem.  The takeaway however remains...”dial it in” regardless and you’re detecting life will be much improved over the FE settings on the same targets.

3.  I didn’t detect any caps in the surf so my testing was limited to the wet and dry areas.  I did try my test sticks again as well and they confirmed what I was finding in the “real world.”  “Dial me in Colonel and you’ll be rewarded.”

4.  Not many targets that day but I did find a productive coin line...which even yielded an English 20 pence coin.

Conclusion:  I’ll use F2 with a high degree of confidence and be diligent to “dial it in” after noise canceling based on the local conditions.

Any additional thoughts from your beach experience is highly encouraged and most welcome.

Just the view from my foxhole...

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Great report CD.  Much appreciated.

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4 hours ago, ColonelDan said:

The junk we routinely have that causes detector problems is bottle caps from a variety of manufacturers, pull tabs, can slaw and aluminum foil with a few tent stakes thrown in now and again.

Nailed it Colonel Dan!

Question: When you found "that a lower sensitivity (13-18) was best when paired with a recovery speed of around 3-4 and an F2 setting of between 5-7. " Did that make the NOX chatty or false?

Did the lowered sensitivity offset the lower recovery speed to keep the depth the same or did it add more depth?

Did you stay with your 3 tone set up?

Anyway, appreciate the work sir! (BTW this steady NE wind will change to East Tuesday night if you feel like a road trip, had a couple feet leave today from one beach).

All the best

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1 hour ago, FloridaSon said:

Nailed it Colonel Dan!

Question: When you found "that a lower sensitivity (13-18) was best when paired with a recovery speed of around 3-4 and an F2 setting of between 5-7. " Did that make the NOX chatty or false?

No, just the opposite.  it was chatty when the sensitivity was higher...20+

Did the lowered sensitivity offset the lower recovery speed to keep the depth the same or did it add more depth?

I can't speak to that as depth was not the focus and I had no way to determine if added depth was a result...I just dug them at whatever depth they happened to be.  Let's put it this way,  added depth was not noticeable and I wasn't really looking for that. 

Did you stay with your 3 tone set up?

Yes, I always stay with my 3 tone set up.  I like simplicity, I'm accustom to it now and it continues to work well for me.

Anyway, appreciate the work sir! (BTW this steady NE wind will change to East Tuesday night if you feel like a road trip, had a couple feet leave today from one beach).

Thank you.  So you're seeing erosion!  Good for you...go get 'em.  You never know where I'll show up and on which coast.  Being retired has its distinct advantage of unrestricted time and travel!  😉

All the best

 

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20 hours ago, ColonelDan said:

As promised, below are my observations of the Equinox update 2.0.1 with concentration on Iron Bias F2 when used on Daytona Beach.  Emphasis is on “MY”observations.  These are mine and mine alone.  You’re observations could very well differ depending on your beach...they’re all somewhat unique.

The beach I hunted was at the Bahama House Hotel in Daytona Beach Shores.  The conditions were sanded in but I did hit it at low tide.  I can’t speak to or test in an environment that some characterize as a “bed of nails”  since we don’t really see such conditions on our beaches.  The junk we routinely have that causes detector problems is bottle caps from a variety of manufacturers, pull tabs, can slaw and aluminum foil with a few tent stakes thrown in now and again.

Primarily I wanted to observe the 2.0.1/F2 function based on detected targets found at an actual beach using various 2.0/F2 settings vs the 1.7.5 FE iron bias function.  You’ll not find any “scientific data” here as these are just my subjective observations….as was always the objective.

Bottom Line Up Front: As fully expected, update 2.0.1 F2 is better at identifying various forms of “junk” alloy than 1.7.5 FE in this beach environment.

Observations:

1. The signals I got from a variety of bottle caps not surprisingly differed depending on the metallurgical composition.  Not all bottle caps are the same although they ring up as junk if they aren’t 100% aluminum.  Some have more aluminum than others while others have more ferrous material.   Success in identifying those signals ranged from “no doubt junk” to “no doubt good targets.”  The all aluminum twist off caps for example still ring up solidly as good targets...same with the ever present pull tab but I have to dig them or risk missing out on gold.  

2.  I once again confirmed the importance of properly “dialing in” the settings appropriate to the environment.   The relationship between sensitivity, recovery speed and F2 made a big difference.    I found that a lower sensitivity (13-18) was best when paired with a recovery speed of around 3-4 and an F2 setting of between 5-7.  Those were the “sweet spots” for me that day at that beach.   Anything lower on the F2 scale than 5 the more the targets sounded like “dig me” targets.  Anything above 7 and I sensed a potential masking issue. Again, just what I saw that day in an environment that had significant EMI I might add.  The sweet spots will differ when EMI is not as much of a problem.  The takeaway however remains...”dial it in” regardless and you’re detecting life will be much improved over the FE settings on the same targets.

3.  I didn’t detect any caps in the surf so my testing was limited to the wet and dry areas.  I did try my test sticks again as well and they confirmed what I was finding in the “real world.”  “Dial me in Colonel and you’ll be rewarded.”

4.  Not many targets that day but I did find a productive coin line...which even yielded an English 20 pence coin.

Conclusion:  I’ll use F2 with a high degree of confidence and be diligent to “dial it in” after noise canceling based on the local conditions.

Any additional thoughts from your beach experience is highly encouraged and most welcome.

Just the view from my foxhole...

 

So a question?  I assume you are hunting in Disc. mode? 

So my question is: When you had a target potentially break threshold did you ever go to all metal to help confirm the target?

Thanks Dave

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I hunted in All Metal...as I always do. F2 was designed for All Metal and that's what I use on our beaches anyway.  I may use Disc in the wet and surf if conditions call for it.   I also use 0 threshold....again, just personal preference.

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With this machine there is so much information LOST hunting a beach in disc ..... especially over iron targets like these bottle caps.   I think its going to take time to  adjust our settings properly...... focusing on sensitivity and depth without loosing targets down deep.  You just dont know what you dont know..... so we tend to assume all is well.   Ive just been to busy having just got home to do much testing.... then left my machine in a buddies car so ... there goes another week lol.   I think ill go the route of trying F2-0 first in a small area to ID targets...... then use the beach default of 6..... then 8 in the same area to see which uncovers what.

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3 hours ago, dewcon4414 said:

With this machine there is so much information LOST hunting a beach in disc ..... especially over iron targets like these bottle caps.   I think its going to take time to  adjust our settings properly...... focusing on sensitivity and depth without loosing targets down deep.  You just dont know what you dont know..... so we tend to assume all is well.   Ive just been to busy having just got home to do much testing.... then left my machine in a buddies car so ... there goes another week lol.   I think ill go the route of trying F2-0 first in a small area to ID targets...... then use the beach default of 6..... then 8 in the same area to see which uncovers what.

Not to rip on anyone. But hunting on a salt beach in all metal is a huge mistake. Unless you really are looking to dig ferrous targets.

I could write a book here but the simple fact is: There is a reason ColonelDan HAS to hunt with the sensitivity between 13-18[ because he is in all metal]. I can hunt this same zone in 20-22 in Disc. Mode.  Without question 20-22 will beat 13-18 every day of the week. My extensive depth testing shows serious trade-offs dropping below 20 on sensitivity.

The NOX is NO Sovereign when it comes to the "all metal mode"

I know because Dan's beach mimic's my conditions with the two modes.  

Dave

 

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Just clarify, I hunted in All Metal on the dry sand and disc in the wet and surf.  Most times in the dry on many other beaches, I can run 18-22 sensitivity.  This weekend I adjusted the sensitivity to suit the local conditions...as I always do in order to smooth out the EQX operation and reported those settings in my OP.  As I reported, there was also more than average EMI in that area at the time.

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