Jump to content

Recommended Posts


My very first target that I dug was a full British Crown, I believe a 1937 George VI. Not that old but a large coin and 50% silver. "

The Aust. 1937 Crown is  ‎92.5% silver, 7.5% copper. The Aust 1937 Penny would be the find of the century

Aust1937 penny.pdf

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Steve,

Glad that you had a great hunt and found something as old as you have. I could never hope to ever find anything as great as that. Think about what that axe was used for and who could of it belonged to all those years ago. You have brought their memories back to life.

The bust reminds me of a Caesar's seal which would of had a wooden handle on it with his seal engraved into it.

I may be wrong about that, but it is a possibility.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The bust reminds me of some pictured here but of course smaller and more worn. It could easily have been a handle or mount of some sort, affixed to some other item.

829AE894-5FD8-4E56-84D0-B7B731FC9E57.jpeg

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Steve,love reading about your adventures over to 'good old Blighty' and the artefacts and coins that you find,that BA palstave  is a beauty,but i suggest when you get it back that its treated for Bronze disease as if its not treated it can spread across the whole axe and spoil it,but its worth getting advice from the colchester club on how its done,another thing worth noting about BA finds especially axes and other tools that also its not uncommon to find more in the same area and what i mean by this is that Bronze was a ultra prized commodity in the day,they use to put scrap bronze items either damaged or broken items into a 'pit' in the ground for storage waiting for a new order for a better word for new weapons/tools etc and then the old scrap bronze was smelted down into new items.Also you can find brand new items like axes,spear heads etc in also new pits.Hence when you find something of BA origin its worth checking around for slag or other tell tale signs of a possible furnace or other pits.

That Lizzy 1 coin is in surprisingly good condition as she was not a popular queen and folks use too try and rub her face away from coins hence alot of them the heads are usually worn away but yours is in decent condition,must admit we do tend to take for granted on what we find,but when i see what you have found and how happy you are and what it means finding say a BA palstave axe then i realise how lucky we are and must admit i/we take it for granted and find say roman/silver hammered coins as basically everyday finds.

Outstanding write up about your adventure over to the UK and will look forward to next year with '2020' vision 🤣 🤣

Once again well done on some amazing finds !!

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks Rick. The issue with bronze disease was mentioned to me with some suggestions, and I will look into it more carefully once I have the ax (or axe) back.

What are everyday type finds for you blokes are impossible here. People on the east coast get excited by 1700s coins that get blown off as mere “greenies” on your side of the pond. I was quite happy actually to find a number of 1800s and even early 1900s coins in fairly sharp condition, as I think the artwork on the large English penny is attractive, especially with a nice green patina.  Many of the greenies in the fields are so corroded by fertilizer that I toss them out.

Even as a visitor I have to admit it is a little shocking to me how quickly I adjust to 1200 - 1600 finds as being commonplace. I can’t get overly excited by many of the hammered silver that are cut or fragments. I’d rather have one quality coin than a dozen low quality coins. I did particularly like the little Lizzy coin, one of my last decent finds, due to its sharp condition.

I will not be back in 2020 due to a milestone anniversary with my wife putting detecting adventures aside in favor of some “us” time. I have found a lot of treasure in my life but she is the gem that tops them all. :smile:

Not my find, just so people know what I am talking about, 1861 Penny...

A20A845E-28FB-49E2-9790-A922E5F97C6D.jpeg

  • Like 5
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I did not find that Simon, it’s just an example for people who do not know what an old English penny looks like. Yours looks better than most I found!

  • Like 1
  • Haha 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Steve -

Thanks for your UK trip report. Reading it made for a perfect start to a leisurely Sunday morning. Your discovery of that Bronze Age axe brought about a deep connection with how you must have felt finding something so ancient. Your feeling of a completed bucket list is evident in your "it cannot Ever get better than this perfect moment" expression in the picture of you holding it. A moment of metal detecting nirvana. Then the Roman bust takes you one step farther along history's path. How fortunate for anyone to be able to go someplace where so much world history intersected. I hope you bask in your well-deserved good fortune. And may it last until the items in your "bucket" settle enough to create just enough space for your list to grow by adding to it another perfect find someday.

 

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's good to see you're doing well over here, some rain arrived just in time to soften the summer concrete for you.
A Bronze Age tool is on my wish-list, I've found fragments, casting scrap, but not the full item yet.

For everyone, here's a summary of British coins, with some photos of very choice examples:
Tony Clayton Site
.. the bronze Victoria penny:
bronze penny

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...