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JohnnyRox

Is It A Meteorite?

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Found it detecting on a beach on Long Island.  It's got some weight to it but not like if it were made out of iron.  It's not magnetic.

 

I didn't clean out all the sand stuck to it.  

 

 

 

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Johnnyrox, most meteorites will attrack a magnet and they usually don't have holes, but i can't say for sure what you have there, good luck on your id.

ht

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Looks like slag to me.

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Looks like slag,dont think it is a meteorite but i could be 'meteorwrong' 😀 i dont think most folks would be able to tell just by looking at it,a simple test from what i have heard is a magnet should stick but that is not a 100% way of eliminating it.......getting it analysed in a laboratory is the best method i would of thought but then costs would be ultra high.

It could/can be very profitable to find these items but its a real niche area and folks who predominately just hunt for these items are usually well up on the knowledge of location and what they are looking for so they usually are the ones that make top money.Its like most things in life if you are at the top of the game in your chosen expertise then they make top dollars !!

 

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Perhaps take it to a natural history museum to see if someone can identify it for you.

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My guess is vesicular basalt with some sort of cavity filling, possibly calcite. Since you have a lot of glacial deposits there the rocks are quite a variety from all over the area.

When in doubt about rocks checking geologic reports for an area can offer clues.

https://www.geo.sunysb.edu/reports/Boulders paper.pdf

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Hi,

I think slag which is a by-product of smelting (usually steel production) can have both metallic and non-metallic properties. Slag can be almost like opaque to semi-transparent glass and have characteristics of glass like conchoidal fracturing (like the inner surface of a conch shell) which produces rounded slivers like flint arrowhead knapping, similar hardness as glass and slag can also have lots of holes large and small. All of those characteristics are present in your specimen along with some characteristics of molten flowing (first and last photos). I have seen holes in some meteorites. I have NOT seen the opaque glassy appearance however. Tektites and Moldavites do have a glassy appearance but they are not meteorites but instead are the result of the soil being melted and reformed at meteorite craters. You could try to chip off a tiny piece from an inconspicuous spot and see how it breaks. Protect you hand and eyes!!!  Rounded thin, sharp, slivers mean glass.

So, I think you were right to suspect a meteorite due to the specimen's appearance but I believe as others have said that it is very opaque slag glass.  

Jeff

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