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Erik Oostra

Coin To Coin: Gofind 44 Easily Beats Gold Bug Pro

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Coin to Coin: GoFind 44 easily beats Gold Bug Pro

Test objective: to determine which detector can find the most coins over two weeks (to allow each detector a few swings at the title). Although the total coin value is obviously important, the main objective is shooting the most Australian coins – whether they be ‘silver’ 5c, 10c, 20c, 50c or ‘gold’ $1 or $2.       

Test site: The public beach at Horseshoe Bay on Magnetic Island, North Queensland.

Local conditions: Narrow white sand beach with a thin layer (about 30cm deep) of newly introduced sand covering an older deeper layer. The beach slopes steeply into the Coral Sea and sits along a pub, restaurants, cafes and water-sports places, so there should be plenty of tourists dropping their coins (I just hope plastic cards won’t bugger up our coin count). Being popular, the beach yields a load of beer bottle tops, aluminium packaging (including a condom wrapper) and rusty crap deeper down.  

Weapons of choice: Erik favours the Gold Bug Pro whilst ‘Matey’ (not his real name) wields his mighty GoFind 44. Whilst Matey had the home bay advantage (Erik’s from another bay) he hadn’t had a looksee for about a year. It was only when he saw Erik on his old stomping ground that he decided to have another swing. The result of the meeting is this very informal ‘coin-shooting’ challenge and bragging rights at the pub.  

Influencing factors: Erik is a total newbie on the GBP. Matey is an old hand with the GoFind and recons Erik’s machine has got too many ‘bells and whistles’ for it to be any good on the beach.

Play-by-Play: As mentioned GBP had already had a few swings before GoFind got into the game. It did so in great style, shooting a handful of gold within half an hour of the glove being thrown down. Not one bit unnerved GBP returned very early Monday morning (counting on huge coin drops over the weekend) and shot some gold and silver. GoFind had a few swings during the first week shooting gold, both large ($1) and small ($2), as well as large silver (20c and 50c). A bit more unnerved, GBP stuck with his game plan and had a good hard swing the following Monday morning, shooting small silver (5c and 10c) at great depth (about 40cm deep) and large silver a lot shallower. GoFind just kept hauling gold. The final epic week saw both detectors shoot a few more coins, but the feeling was that the site had been well and truly over-worked and Lady Luck was playing her hand (usually in GoFind’s favour). By now both detectors had also broadened their search areas, hitting nearby picnic and bbq areas as well as further along the bay where topless sunbakers hangout (yes, local testing conditions were very tough). Swinging around the bus stop and the back of the pub also proved lucrative.   

The Results:

Gold Bug Pro: large gold (2 x $1), large silver (3 x 50c and 7 x 20c) and small silver (6 x 10c and 4 x 5c). Total: 22 coins valued at $5.70

GoFind 44: large gold (16 x $1), small gold (5 x $2) and large silver (5 x 50c and 2 x 20c). Total: 28 coins valued at a massive $28.90

The Verdict: The GoFind 44 is the ‘must have’ detector for both large and small beach gold! It is also handy for large silver but not too hot on the small stuff, shooting none at all. Whilst the Gold Bug Pro is universally recognised for its gold finding ability, on Australian ‘gold’ coins it rates poorly (shooting only large gold on a few occasions and no small gold at all). The GBP is the detector to get if you are after small silver at depth, its ability to find 5c and 10c coins is second to none (at least to the GoFind 44).

Whilst this very newbie detector prospector has obviously got a lot to learn, he is seriously considering adding a GoFind 44 to his ‘beach gold’ arsenal. Until I get it, Matey has promised to keep his GoFind away from my local bay. Afterwards it’s open season on all the island’s beaches and bays, I can’t wait…

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Uh, Chase, I'm almost certain he wasn't kidding. I'm pretty sure he's gonna be buying a 44 if you dont lay down some educational content.

Erik-kidding or not that was a well written entertaining post, thanks!

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This was not Gold Bug Pro versus Go Find 44, but new detectorist versus experienced detectorist. It beautifully illustrates why I always bet on experience and not the machine. Thanks for posting!

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1 hour ago, Lacky said:

Uh, Chase, I'm almost certain he wasn't kidding. I'm pretty sure he's gonna be buying a 44 if you dont lay down some educational content.

Erik-kidding or not that was a well written entertaining post, thanks!

At Steve's site, everything can be learned by reading what's here.  Erik, for what you are trying to do, I highly recommend you consider the versatile Minelab Equinox, it will accomplish everything you want to do and hope to do on the beach with a single detector that can combine the positves of both detectors you mentioned in your post and then some.  Even the forthcoming ML Vanquish 440 could get it done.

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hehe that was a well written post Erik 🙂 

As an owner of the Gold Bug Pro and Go-Find 40 my results couldn't be different to yours, borrow your friends Go-Find, bury some targets and compare the two yourself that way you can test them both on the same targets at the same time, or even do a beach detect with both detectors with you so you can compare on in ground targets.  

The Go-Find however does work remarkably well on beaches, you can have it maximum sensitivity usually no troubles at all.  The Go-Find also only has 4 levels of discrimination which makes your dig decisions easier as it virtually forces you to dig everything.

go-find-44-interface.jpg

Because of this you can bet the user of it was digging everything except the Nail/Horse shoe, and maybe even digging that too if there isn't too much junk around.

If you dig it all you've got the most chance of doing well.  I'm sure with your Gold Bug you were digging it all too however those 5c, 10c, 20c and 50c Aussie coins are cupro nickle, they'll often show up as ferrous and ID numbers all over the place targets on the GBP making them seem highly likely to be junk so it's best you literally do dig every thing that beeps if you want to as well as the Go-Find that lacks ID numbers so has nothing to put you off digging targets.  I do notice you got a number of 5c and 10c coins and Matey got none, smaller coins so harder to detect, Go-Find missed them all and in my experience you find a lot more smaller value coins than coins like the $1 and $2 as people are less protective of them and put them in their pockets more and the higher value coins go in their wallet/purse.

I hope you didn't buy your Gold Bug Pro off Ebay!

The Go-Find isn't bad, but it's by no means as capable as a Gold Bug Pro.  I think in this case it was the user doing better, not the detector 🙂

If you want to leave Matey in the dust buy yourself an Equinox 800, do lots of practice and then go into Mateys Bay and jump in the water with it 🙂  Matey will get a surprise 😮

8750552-3x2-940x627.jpg

How could you not want to be a water detectorist when you live there, and it gets you out of the heat, that inlet is like a nice warm swimming pool, I spent an entire day floating around in there over near the rocks 🙂

 

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Thanks a lot for your thoughts everyone,,

Yes, this post was written tongue in cheek and as Steve says it very much shows the difference between someone who knows what they are doing and someone who doesn't.. This hasn't put me off though.. its only made me keener to learn about detector prospecting (and as i mentioned it really is no great hardship detecting on tropical beaches)..

Phrunt, i did buy the GBP on ebay.. am just reading the  horror stories about fakes on this forum.. crikey! I'd be very pissed off if i've fallen for a scam.. is there a huge difference in performance between a fake and the real thing? could that mean that my detector is not set at 19 kHz? maybe its a lower frequency? but shouldn't that be better for shooting coins? 

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8 hours ago, Erik Oostra said:

Phrunt, i did buy the GBP on ebay.. am just reading the  horror stories about fakes on this forum.. crikey! I'd be very pissed off if i've fallen for a scam.. is there a huge difference in performance between a fake and the real thing? could that mean that my detector is not set at 19 kHz? maybe its a lower frequency? but shouldn't that be better for shooting coins? 

Do you still have the link from the seller when you purchased it, was it from China by any chance? If it was from Australia was it from a dealer (metal detecting shop) or just some person named something like Frank Chan? 

This might be a good read for you.

Best indication of if you got a fake was the price, how much did you pay for it? I was a bit suspicious when you said you've got the 11" coil and the 5" coil, the DP package with both coils is the package the fakes come with most often.  The fakes will be 19khz, they're a cloned copy, the consistency and quality of components is an issue, also how well the Chinese know how to tune them.  They do have trim pots that need adjusted at the factory on the circuit board.

The fakes appear to work to a point, I've heard the coils aren't near as good as the genuine coils, the Chinese appear to have trouble making coils but it maybe why you were beaten by a Go-Find.

I made this video for you of a $1 coin I've had buried for almost 2 years in my front yard, It's at 8"/20cm.  I put the Nel Sharpshooter on the Gold Bug Pro so it was a fair comparison to the Go-Find with the Go-Find having the edge as it's coil is 1.5" wider., the closest coil size to the fixed hard wired coil on the Go-Find 40.  For a bit of fun I ran the Equinox over it too, unfair advantage, bigger coil and a detector that gets way more accurate ID's in my mild soils.

All these VLF's when using the same size coil in my opinion hit the targets pretty close to the same in depth in my mild soils, what changes is how good the Target ID's are.  You'll see the Equinox does well sitting on it's 20/21/22 that the gold coins come up as, the GBP not too badly sitting around 78/79/80/81 and the Go-Find is all over the place even though it only has 4 ID segments it nearly uses them all 😉  On a shallow target the discrimination on the Go-Find is much better but as soon as something gets a bit deep it's lost.

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Phrunt, thanks again for your knowledge and input.. the GBP i bought came from someone in Sydney (at least that was the seller's location according to ebay) and compared to some others i saw on ebay this one was branded Fisher (as opposed to 'unbranded').. It also has manufacture numbers recorded on the box and inside the battery compartment.. i know this ebay seller could easily be selling on a fake but how can i tell? is there any way to check the frequency of this GBP? If it is a fake, i'm at least happy that it could be 19kHz.. I read elsewhere that fakes usually ran much lower at around 7 to 9 kHz.. hence my vain hope that despite it being a fake, i'd ended up with the ultimate ground balancing 'coin-shooter'.. with 'bells and whistles' that old Matey could only dream about..

also thanks for the video.. it reinforces what i thought all along: it won't do me any good moaning about my tools, i have to get out there and gain the experience (and learn as much as i can along the way)..  

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If you have an Airtest range of 2-euro coin around 30-32 cm, and for 1 gram gold brick will be 19-20cm, so this detector Fisher Gold Bug-pro... with 11 "DD coil in discrimination has the right range ..

280126468_JUN6iphone5S2019068_DxO.jpg.755335ae44dce1271b57208f3ac80fe3.jpg

 

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