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Coins & Relics From An Old S. P. Desert Stop

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Wow, two silver dollars! I’ve only ever found one in all my years detecting. And great relic finds also... good for you!

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Sounds like that $1 is pretty special, that horse is pretty good, I'm surprised it's in one piece as everything I find like that is broken!  What are the things that look like a washer with writing on it? Some sort of token?

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Thanks. Yes they are trade and tax tokens.

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I like coins/tokens with the centre cut out.

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Very nice finds, I need to find another place to hunt.

The areas I have been on lately has so much chatter it makes me think there is something wrong with my 800.

If I can't get it to work better I will be sending it in to make sure that it isn't broken.

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Great discoveries!  I'm surprised you didn't find any small denomination coins.  I bet they're still there.  Maybe the difficulty of the ground is hiding them so far.  That padlock in particular is a nice find, with manufacturer and what appears to be usage wording, or is that just the model of the padlock?

I'm not used to that kind of ground so can't help you with your settings.  But you might want to take some coins out there, bury them (I wouldn't go deep, at least at first) and then adjust your settings to maximize the responses.

Thanks for posting and please continue to do so as you pull more goodies out of that site.

 

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Can’t say I’ve really hunted a place like that but if I was Beach Mode would be at the top of my list, and sensitivity down until stable. I have found most people want stable detectors but also will not reduce sensitive far enough to get the for fear of losing depth. It’s generally just a choice... high sensitivity, deal with the chatter, or turn it down and be happy. You will still find stuff.

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GB: Thanks, have found dimes but the condition is so poor that it wasn't worth showing. The lock reads Southern Pacific Co.Roadway and Bridge Department.

Steve: I have been running sensitivity like "low beams in the fog" particularly in difficult conditions, I like stable. The beach 1 mode is the best in the alkali mud for sure as I have toggled back and forth to park 1,the most reliable signal is beach. I am sure this place has been detected multiple times over the years, the Equinox being the advantage. The site is giving my friend with a T2 fits

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    • By GB_Amateur
      You may have noticed the lack of my finds postings lately.  It's been a pretty lean second half of the year.  I'll go into the perceived reasons in my year end wrapup in a couple weeks.  In the meantime, here is a surprise find which I'm hoping is authentic.
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      After getting the dirt soaked off I checked the date, and immediately noticed the imprint above the date -- part of the word LIBERTY spelled backward.  My first question when I get an unusual find (coin, ring, relic, or even gold nugget) is "is this authentic or is it a reproduction/fake?"  Certainly that was a thought that quickly went through my mind.  I'm still not sure but (as you'll see below) there is at least one good sign that it's for real.  Until I can get it looked at by a specialist in numismatic rarities I'm going conservative(?) with 80-20 that it's the real deal.
      Error coin collecting is a special, uncommon branch of numismatics.  I have some books on the subject and there are multiple websites.  I did some digging and came to some conclusions, as always which may not be valid.  One of my conclusions is that if this specimen is authentic then it is quite rare.  Unfortunately 'rare' doesn't always translate to 'valuable' and that is the case with most error coins.  If real, it's an oddity, a curiosity, and a collectible but the demand is small so the value (crossing point of supply and demand if you remember your high school ecconomics) is low.
      Time to look carefully at the photos.  A friend took these pics with his Smartphone and they are better than I could have done, but I still plan on getting better pictures from another friend who has high end photography equipment.  When I do that I'll post them here.  In the meantime look at the obverse (Lincoln's head side).  BTW, I've looked at these by hand with a magnifier and I can get better resolution, so I'll emphasize what I see that way and compare/contrast what you can see in the attached images.  Not the entire word LIBERTY is shown backward.  The 'L' missed the coin, being off the edge when struck.  The 'B' is vertically doubled. In fact I think the rest of word is doubled, too, but not as clearly distinguished.  Another feature occurs at 8 O'clock where the letters 'RUST' are apparent, but also backward.  Now here's clue worth noting:  the location of the 'RUST' (from the word 'TRUST' in the motto 'IN GOD WE TRUST' is not consistent with the location of the backward 'LIBERTY'.  Another feature which is only barely visible in the photo is a ghost rim between 9 O'clock and 11 O'clock.  Finally there is a hollow 'shadow' in front of Lincoln's face (not apparent in the photo) which is consistent with the backward impression of Lincoln's head on the planchet, and consistently located with the 'IBERTY'.
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