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flakmagnet

GPZ Suddenly Not Balancing Out The Ferrite

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Has anyone else had this happen? I was using the same settings I use in this area I go to. My tuning process was the same, but the last time I tuned, the ferrite wouldn't balance out. The detector still worked great but I couldn't figure out why it wouldn't balance the ferrite out. 

Should I have done a factory reset or something and just put in all the settings again? 

Suggestions?

Thanks.

 

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Flakmagnet

I have had this problem a few times.

Find some mild ground then try to ferrite balance for 2 to 3 minutes.

If that doesn’t work then RESET ALL settings. 

Then try a long ferrite balance again.

Then restore individual favorite settings and turn on the GPS and WM-12 if you use them.

Have a good day,
Chet
 

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Thank you Chet. That's what I will do, although it is strangely difficult to find mild ground where I detect. Makes me miss Rye Patch even more than usual.

Thank you again...

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Chet,

Hey, I forgot to Thank You!  You seen me way out in the Desert looking for something and not swinging my Coil.  Thanks for giving me your extra Ferrite Ring!  They are a must item in my book!  Somewhere out there, is mine by 3 dug Holes, 2 had nuggets and one had (which was my first hole) heavy Black Sands which I hunt for too!  That’s why, I like to hear my working Threshold you can hear the minerals change.  One I heard that and dug that false signal with a magnet heavy with black sands, I Retuned my machine.  I swung next to that first hole to see if it mild the Minerals down and got a tone.  I was about, to try another retuning trick, but swung a couple feet over and it was perfect!  Slowly swung back to the tone, dug it nugget and the next one was too!  Of course, I started my grid of the area and walked off and left my Ferrite.  Thanks again

Rick

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