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What Do You Make Of These Piles?

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I’m always trying to learn how to correctly identify evidences of the older workings.  These piles caught my attention because they look like old dry washing header piles, but there are no discernible tailings piles. The rock piles are quite flattened, perhaps this means they are old. But, the other mysterious finding is that there are relatively no large rocks found between the piles.  This is in contrast to the surrounding terrain, which is homogeneously strewn with rocks of variable size. This makes me wonder if the piles were formed by detectorists trying to get a more level surface. Then, again, I don’t see any recent evidence of recent diggings due to the flatness of the ground.  Is anybody with more experience willing to share their take on it?

 

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Hard to guess, perhaps someone raked some to detect...

usually the tail piles will be faint but still visible.....

if it was detected there should be shallow dig holes from the old Vlf days...those marks hardly ever disappear completely.

Did you detect any?
fred

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What Fred said. Think if they were dry washing piles were might be more piles of smaller tailings…but only guessing.

 

 

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I would be in cruise mode around the edges of that area.

 

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8 hours ago, fredmason said:

Did you detect any?

Yes. I scanned around with the smallest GM1000 coil followed by the SDC. Nothing yellow. It is sitting right on top of an alluvial fan with gold in it though. 

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50 minutes ago, geof_junk said:

I would be in cruise mode around the edges of that area.

 

I may have to go back and try around a few more of them. They do seem more out of place in person. 

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14 minutes ago, vanursepaul said:

Just rock piles left from the wind erosion.... 

I have wondered that, too. They are just so oddly homogeneous. 

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Maybe natural but it is difficult to be so certain from pics....wind would not do that, I don’t see water doing that.... I vote for very old dry wash headers or pretty old raking...

how you doing, Paul?

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Definitely Gilla Monster dens.  The area should only be detected by a Gilla Monster expert such as myself. Now where did you say this was?

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