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What kind of batteries ya'll use? I used to buy nothing but Duracell rechargeable, then in the last year I couldn't find any. I just bought some Rayovac with a charger, but they don't seem to hold a charge. I charged them, put them in, they showed full charge as I hunted for about an hour, then the next day only see two dots on the power gauge. I recharged them hoping they needed a break in, but they did the same thing. Now I have used them for 3 days, with only two dots showing, they don't seem to be going any lower, but I don't trust them. I just did a search and found a bunch of Duracells, I might of been looking for the same charger I used to have, that died, and couldn't find it. I hate to go spend more on a different brand...I didn't notice until now, the rechargeable's are 1.2 volt, whereas the regular are 1.5 volt, would that make a difference?

 

 I don't want a battery pack, at least not a NiCad...

 

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I have several types of NiMH rechargeables including Duracell. No real preference, half came with detectors I owned or own. VLF detectors are not like some PI detectors. A VLF runs at just below the battery warning level at all times. The power is regulated down to that. When the batteries get down to warning level you get the warning, and then when you get under the operating voltage the unit quits. The bottom line being it does not matter with nearly any VLF whether you use 1.5V alkaline or 1.2V NiMH. As long as you are anywhere over the warning level for as long as possible you are fine.

NiCads sucked and still suck. I can’t believe White’s still sells NiCad packs but they do.

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I use panasonic  Eneloop Pro in my Whites v3i, My Whites Surf P.I Dual Field. They are outstanding even for cameras. Ni- Mh 2450 mAh. They are available world wide. I have been using them for many years  and the Whites v3i is heavy on batteries.  There  is a cheaper Eneloop which is 1900mAh both batteries are 1.2 v .

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There is no better AA or AAA NiMH than Eneloops if you ask me.  The White Eneloops 1900mAh handle more charge cycles than the black Pro's, about 1500 more from memory and work well in most things.  I use the white ones in all of my detectors, I bought some of the black ones too but the white ones have been perfectly fine for VLF's....

I've got a weather station, I've had white eneloops in it for just over 4 years now and it's still sending data to my base station for it that's about 180 feet away.  It sends the weather data every 6 seconds, still on the first batteries.  It has a tiny little solar panel on it to maintain them.

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MX7........very nice detector. I feed mine standard AA alkaline as I can buy a 30 pack of quality cells for less than $10. I always take them for proper recycling/disposal when they are dead. I get 30 to 40 hours of run time on one set.......so that costs me about $2.50. I’m okay with that 👍

Toany

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7 hours ago, Tony said:

I feed mine standard AA alkaline as I can buy a 30 pack of quality cells for less than $10.

Where do you get those, and what is the brand?

 

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Do you get the Aldi batteries Tony?

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I just took the batteries that came in the detector out. It was a brand I had never heard of, Nuon, they are just alkaline, not rechargeable. They held all four dots for along time, then just recently went to two. I haven't been able to use it a lot since I got it, until lately. The Rayovac's I have are 1350 mAh...I have used them about 3 hours, and they are staying the same.

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The batteries are Varta......Made in Germany.

I should mention that I’m in Australia. 30 cells for about $6 US.

Good old Bunnings is where you can get them.

The batteries are always fresh stock too 👍

Tony

 

AB0FF331-97CB-4CDA-B94B-1D55AB5E2775.png

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7 hours ago, phrunt said:

Do you get the Aldi batteries Tony?

Bunnings.......sometimes on special for $5........crazy cheap.

Tony

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