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Luis

Video - Finds Made By Le Jag With Pulse Detectors

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I’m not trying to pour cold water on things but it is quite difficult to determine the original depth of the ring....in liquified sand, the ring will continuously sink to the lowest point created by the several attempts to dig it out......just sayin’ 👍

A bit of detective work........If you look at the video at around the 7:35 mark, you will notice that the “likely” maximum depth can be seen where the scoop is buried prior to retrieval....where the steel meets the yellow handle. I would guess the original depth is probably no more than 12” deep and this is allowing for some angle penetration by the point of the scoop but NOT allowing for the likelihood of the ring getting knocked down by all the digging (and some off centre digging too). I  like your enthusiasm PPP...... 😁

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5 hours ago, PPP said:

Oh my GOD!!! what a depth!!! INSANE.  20 gram ring!!!!! you got to be kidding.That was awsome.My deepest targets vwith the Nox is around a 12inches and with my ATX aound 15.I think you recovered those targets between a range of 18 and 20 maybe deeper.Greate jobb LE.JAG with the video and please share more videos if you have any more!!!!!!!!! I WANT AN AQ!!!!!!!

Keep on dreaming  we still have to wait a long time it seams, there is only one production model sold, and we all know who owns it.

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And it’s back with Fisher 😳

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7 hours ago, TerryinHawaii said:

LE,JAG, I noticed that some how you pickup the object found with your rubber boot.  How do you do that?

I don't understand your question Terry
  to point the target ?
I use the edge of the coil / as effective a Pinpointer

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6 hours ago, vive equinox said:

Footing the sand is the faster way to recover the targets... 

We dont ear the comments and the sound of AQ in the vidéo... except " viens voir " " la vache " 😂  

the nox dont have any signal with the ring ? 

Did the AQ was able to take this ring at the initial deep in réject mode ? 

Il y avait trop de vent , c'est dommage , et si on entend bien le Oh la vache , c'est par ce qu'il crie 🤣

pas de son au premier passage pour le nox, il l'a accrocher après un léger coup de pelle

je l'ai pas essayé en discri , j'avais fait plusieurs plomb avant

et le son n'était pas parfait / pas mauvais , mais pas top ... (bague tête en bas , je pense..)

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5 hours ago, PPP said:

Oh my GOD!!! what a depth!!! INSANE.  20 gram ring!!!!! you got to be kidding.That was awsome.My deepest targets vwith the Nox is around a 12inches and with my ATX aound 15.I think you recovered those targets between a range of 18 and 20 maybe deeper.Greate jobb LE.JAG with the video and please share more videos if you have any more!!!!!!!!! I WANT AN AQ!!!!!!!

with good weather conditions, no wind
silence / we can go down to 20 '
there, I'm about 15 or a little more ..

 

 

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2 hours ago, Tony said:

I’m not trying to pour cold water on things but it is quite difficult to determine the original depth of the ring....in liquified sand, the ring will continuously sink to the lowest point created by the several attempts to dig it out......just sayin’ 👍

A bit of detective work........If you look at the video at around the 7:35 mark, you will notice that the “likely” maximum depth can be seen where the scoop is buried prior to retrieval....where the steel meets the yellow handle. I would guess the original depth is probably no more than 12” deep and this is allowing for some angle penetration by the point of the scoop but NOT allowing for the likelihood of the ring getting knocked down by all the digging (and some off centre digging too). I  like your enthusiasm PPP...... 😁

when i put the disc in the water
she just moved / I can't hear her anymore
until then, the sound does not vary / it is still in place

my gamate, from the tip to the yellow handle
is 45 cm = 17.71 '
it's hard to say how much she was
and that’s not the purpose of the video ..
but it was pretty deep

also note, that the ring is a small diameter
it does not pass to my little finger
larger diameter / good weather condition
see a lower carat (18k this one) = easier to detect
  we can largely hope 20 '

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LE.JAG,  in this video after you have pin pointed the object.  I see your foot raising up and then you have the object in your hand.

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1 hour ago, TerryinHawaii said:

LE.JAG,  in this video after you have pin pointed the object.  I see your foot raising up and then you have the object in your hand.

you talk about the button
I don't see it with the mud on the surface
  i hear it
and I point with the disc and the tip of the foot ...

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Translation problems. I see what Terry means. In the video it appears you are lifting your leg up as if you have somehow picked the ring up with your toes. You do not appear to bend over at all, so in the video it looks like your are using your leg and your booted foot to somehow pick the ring up and put it in your hand.

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      Rivers, JM, Nyquist, JE, Terry, D.O., and W. E. Doll. 2004. Investigation into the Origin of Magnetic Soils on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee. Soil Science Society of America Journal, Vol. 68 No. 5 p. 1772-1779.
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