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Steve Herschbach

Chris Ralph Youtube Prospecting Channel

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For those of you more inclined to viewing instead of reading, Chris Ralph has put together an impressive collection of videos here. He is working hard at it adding a new video every week. Chris is very knowledgeable on various aspects of prospecting and mining with in-depth knowledge on geology. Take a few minutes and check it out.

Also check out Chris’ book, Fists Full of Gold

book-fists-full-of-gold.jpg

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Thanks for the info Steve , never miss reading articles by Chris . Now I've got plenty of viewing . Going to a PMAV meeting tonight in the Golden Triangle and will inform the group in general business .

Cheers

goldrat 

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