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Cal_Cobra

Cal_cobra Meets An Indian Princess On The Spanish Trail

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10 hours ago, Cal_Cobra said:

Thanks Steve! 

I would say that it was easily 7" or so deep, it was two shovels full of dirt to get it out.  I left the hole open so I could examine it the next morning and it wasn't quite as deep as my Garrett pinpointer, so between 7"-8" I'd say, but probably closer to 7".

That's a terrific job, then, for the Equinox to give a good, solid ID like that on such a deep, small target.  Wow!

Again -- just an AMAZING hunt!

And AU-55 on the gold coin?!  WOW...

It IS another really cool side note, as you mentioned, that both of the coins that have more substantial numismatic value are also the ones that happened to be in really nice condition!  While you, like I, don't sell coin finds, it's still pretty amazing that you have a couple with that much worth.

Did your friend tell you what the 1865-S Seated Dime might grade at?  You might have a couple of $3000+ coins there...

Steve

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Good job Brian way to sniff em out...I'd say that spot has more coming your way...

strick

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I'm running out of adjectives for West Coast coin hunters' finds.  Stupendous??  Thanks for the video.  It's always fun to see the sincere reactions with good finds.

You've downplayed the 1863-S dime, and given the competition this time I understand that.  Interestingly the number minted is less than the 1865-S, although the values across the board are less for the 1863-S, so likely there were other occurrences that make the more recently minted one more valuable.  And, yes, condition plays a huge part, but it looks to me that the 1863-S with the *proper* cleaning could turn out to be pretty decent.  (BTW, I commend you for not rubbing your finds in the wild.  You are in the minority.)

So, do you think your friend Tom is going to change his mind about hunting that site now?  And more importantly, will you welcome him back?😁

I agree with Steve H. about the combination of detector and detectorist leading to your success.  I'm going a little deeper on that.  You've hunted this site for 10 years with different detectors.  Yes, the detectors have improved.  But have they improved as much as you have?

People tend to emphasize that sites get cleaned out of the trash along with their reduction of valuable finds, and then assign that cleanup with making it easier by unmasking more valuables.  I agree with that, too.  But look at all the trash you are still cleaning up, and you mentioned that you left some (especially the sheet metal) behind.  I think your perseverance trumps all of these other factors.  I look forward to your future expose's, even though this one will be difficult to exceed.

 

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4 hours ago, steveg said:

That's a terrific job, then, for the Equinox to give a good, solid ID like that on such a deep, small target.  Wow!

Again -- just an AMAZING hunt!

And AU-55 on the gold coin?!  WOW...

It IS another really cool side note, as you mentioned, that both of the coins that have more substantial numismatic value are also the ones that happened to be in really nice condition!  While you, like I, don't sell coin finds, it's still pretty amazing that you have a couple with that much worth.

Did your friend tell you what the 1865-S Seated Dime might grade at?  You might have a couple of $3000+ coins there...

Steve

Thanks Steve.

I didn't ask my friend to look at the dime, only the $1 coin.  There are a few other sites somewhat close to this one, but their in cow pastures, so the silver coins from those sites are typically victims of cow urine, which really does a number on most metals (particularly silver).  I've dug a few semi-key date seateds at those sites and they'd get hammered with "environmental" damage if ever sent in for grading, which is a shame. 

Although we don't have largies and Colonial coins jumping out of the ground out west, what we do have going for us is a high propensity of San Francisco mint coins, which tend to be the lions share of the higher value coins from the 1800's, and gold coins seemed to be used/lost out west much more then back east for whatever reason. 

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3 hours ago, strick said:

Good job Brian way to sniff em out...I'd say that spot has more coming your way...

strick

Thanks Strick!  That territorial gold coin your friend dug is a find of a lifetime, amazing find. 

Need to hit the springs again before the grass and the summer kicks in and the grounds like cement. 

-Brian

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3 hours ago, GB_Amateur said:

I'm running out of adjectives for West Coast coin hunters' finds.  Stupendous??  Thanks for the video.  It's always fun to see the sincere reactions with good finds.

You've downplayed the 1863-S dime, and given the competition this time I understand that.  Interestingly the number minted is less than the 1865-S, although the values across the board are less for the 1863-S, so likely there were other occurrences that make the more recently minted one more valuable.  And, yes, condition plays a huge part, but it looks to me that the 1863-S with the *proper* cleaning could turn out to be pretty decent.  (BTW, I commend you for not rubbing your finds in the wild.  You are in the minority.)

So, do you think your friend Tom is going to change his mind about hunting that site now?  And more importantly, will you welcome him back?😁

I agree with Steve H. about the combination of detector and detectorist leading to your success.  I'm going a little deeper on that.  You've hunted this site for 10 years with different detectors.  Yes, the detectors have improved.  But have they improved as much as you have?

People tend to emphasize that sites get cleaned out of the trash along with their reduction of valuable finds, and then assign that cleanup with making it easier by unmasking more valuables.  I agree with that, too.  But look at all the trash you are still cleaning up, and you mentioned that you left some (especially the sheet metal) behind.  I think your perseverance trumps all of these other factors.  I look forward to your future expose's, even though this one will be difficult to exceed.

 

Hi GB!

I learned long ago not to rub silver and gold coins.  I carry water with me in the field so I can do a quick rinse to get a better idea of what I have without having to rub them.  I've seen Tom scratch two gold coins and numerous silver coins with his "stabbing" recovery technique.  I probably make my holes larger then necessary, but I try to avoid damaging my finds in the the field during the recovery process. 

The 1863-S dime doesn't actually look too bad.  Short of using Ezest (and maybe that's the way to go), any suggestions on how to properly clean it?

Thanks for the kudos on my improving detecting skills.  Ironically I started off park hunting and was pretty good at sniffing out deep old silver in Golden Gate Park and others, but the past ten years or so have spoiled me with some great relic sites, and now I'm afraid if you put me in a trashy park to cherry pick deep silver, I'd be lost.  Tom's very good at that, and is always pestering me to hit old parks when we go on our road trips, but truth be told, it's the same amount of effort to spend all day in a park busting your tail to dig a couple of mercs as it is to work a relic site and have a chance at a seated, cool relics, or maybe even a gold coin.  

There's still plenty of trash at this site.  Ration cans, iron of all types from nails to large pieces of every nature, and the .22 shells and shotgun shells, can be punishing.  There's also an area with those old roofing nails, not sure what their made of, but they can sound pretty good if oriented the right way, and they TID around 22+ on the EQ800, so I dig them. I think the bottom line is that I was guilty of trying to cherry pick a bit, but a few years ago I did an Experiment with my Multi Kruzer and started digging all the .22 shell signals, and was rewarded with some nice buttons and other interesting relics, so it's turned into a dig all site.  Still nice feeling to get a mid to high 20's tight zippy signal on the Equinox there 🙂

I always enjoy this site, even though I only get there once or twice at best a years, but I suspect there's more treasures awaiting for future trips, Tom or no Tom 🤠

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4 hours ago, Cal_Cobra said:

The 1863-S dime doesn't actually look too bad.  Short of using Ezest (and maybe that's the way to go), any suggestions on how to properly clean it?

I'm still studying up on coin cleaning so I'll have to defer.  But I think this is the kind of coin that needs care.  Common (high mintage) coins -- it doesn't matter much what you do.  Key and semi-key dates are where over-zealous cleaning can really affect value.  I realize (since you said) that you aren't going to be cashing them in, but I like to compare to pieces of art -- they deserve to be handled carefully.

4 hours ago, Cal_Cobra said:

There's also an area with those old roofing nails, not sure what their made of, but they can sound pretty good if oriented the right way, and they TID around 22+ on the EQ800, so I dig them.

I have the same issue with roofing nails.  They are simply zinc coated ('galvanized') steel, and as you point out, the head is big enough to give a nice moderately high TID signal.  I suspect the shank contributes, since vertical nails have given me good TID's in air tests in the past.  I just live with them (i.e. dig 'em up) rather than to try and figure out if it's a roofing nail or an Indian Head penny or a piece of jewelry or....

 

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On 2/16/2020 at 5:09 PM, GB_Amateur said:

I'm still studying up on coin cleaning so I'll have to defer.  But I think this is the kind of coin that needs care.  Common (high mintage) coins -- it doesn't matter much what you do.  Key and semi-key dates are where over-zealous cleaning can really affect value.  I realize (since you said) that you aren't going to be cashing them in, but I like to compare to pieces of art -- they deserve to be handled carefully.

I have the same issue with roofing nails.  They are simply zinc coated ('galvanized') steel, and as you point out, the head is big enough to give a nice moderately high TID signal.  I suspect the shank contributes, since vertical nails have given me good TID's in air tests in the past.  I just live with them (i.e. dig 'em up) rather than to try and figure out if it's a roofing nail or an Indian Head penny or a piece of jewelry or....

 

Given I'll never send the 1863-S in for grading, I decided to try a little Ezest for a few minutes, and she cleaned up nicely. Looking at the PCGS Photograde guide, I'd say she's a solid VF25, which puts her right @ $450, not bad at all :biggrin:

9C882814-856B-4F13-B97B-EFB0B3B2BAD0.jpeg

Yeah those roofing nails are a PITA, but I just dig them anyhow. It's fun to try to ID them before digging, but I just dig them.  I figure if I keep stripping the junk out, it'll reveal some squeakers masked by the junk.  

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Awesome Hunt!! Congrats on some great finds! 

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Brian,  Sorry I am late to the show, but was in MX digging gold nuggets.  Then when I returned, I had to get caught up with customers orders and get their detectors shipped out. 

My hats off to you as one of the few folks who takes a detector and becomes one with it, as one of your arms.  Those finds are hearth throbs even without the low mintage.  But to dig like that for a day and then get done and open up the coin value guide and see $$$$ is even more incredible, but well deserved.

I'll say this for sure.  The Equinox has produced more gold coin finds than any other detector I have sold in such a short amount of time.  I probably have 15 gold coins found by my own customers using the NOX.  In fact I have not posted yet, but another was recently found.  I'll get to it later, but your video, finds and story are certainly EPIC.

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