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I just bought this magnet off of brute magnetic's  For magnet fishing and I hope I find some neat finds i will keep you guys informed on how it goes and if i find anything! https://brutemagnetics.com/collections/top-mount/products/brute-box-500-lb-magnet-fishing-bundle-2-95-magnet-rope-carabiner-threadlocker

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My son sent me a magnet fishing setup last year for my birthday, I’ve only tried it once for a few minutes I didn’t find much but carry it in the Jeep just in case I find myself someplace I want to look. Depending where you live I’d imagine water crossings in historically rich area would A good place? They’ed probably kick me out of the Bellagio if I try it there, lol. 880# magnet should hang on pretty good, happy hunting show us what you find.

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Around my area(Wisconsin )I have a lot of old brides and And lakes Where i can go magnet fish. I can go out to the rivers but ill have to wait till the spring when the lake thaws out to go to them

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2 hours ago, Old Farm Hunter said:

Around my area(Wisconsin )I

Some people say that Hoffa was dumped in a barrel up that direction, you might get lucky and find him.

Lake Michigan is also a good place to look also, there are a lot of things out there.

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Magnet fishing showing up here is ironic to me by the very fact it will attach to the same metal that metal detectorists try so hard to discriminate out, iron.  Since gold, silver, copper, and nickel will not attach to it, it has never really intrigued me (except when I was a kid and bought one out of a magazine ad).  That's not to say that there are not interesting iron and steel things to be recovered, but especially attempting to recover those things from the water, you know they are going to be pretty corroded.

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11 hours ago, Chase Goldman said:

Magnet fishing showing up here is ironic to me by the very fact it will attach to the same metal that metal detectorists try so hard to discriminate out, iron.  Since gold, silver, copper, and nickel will not attach to it, it has never really intrigued me (except when I was a kid and bought one out of a magazine ad).  That's not to say that there are not interesting iron and steel things to be recovered, but especially attempting to recover those things from the water, you know they are going to be pretty corroded.

  • Some of the videos on YouTube are pretty fun to watch you get to cherry pick the finds, pulling out a gun would be a little rush kinda like finding a little nugget, might even help solve a crime, one of the videos over in Eastern Europe guy pulled an old ww2 machine gun out of a river. Find a place going through the old records and maps where you think a long abandoned river crossing might have been and bring your detector too, once you pull out all the old iron you can cherry pick the high tones. Might even find A safe full of gold, but that might take more than one magnet😀.

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Magnet Fishing is hot in the Uk. lots of canals and channels that are hundreds of years old. Lots of cool stuff is being brought up.

 

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Magnet fishing would be more compelling in countries that use ferromagnetic metallic coinage, I suppose and that probably improves its popularity in European countries.  That type of coinage does not exist in the US.

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I am in Canada that has nickel plated, bronze plated steel coins. Magnets work great for plucking them out of your goodie bag.

PROBE2.JPG

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