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Yes its funny how we seem to gravitate back to those areas which produced in the past after the punters have gone home during the summer months (same here).  I am always surprised when those areas deliver the goods, scratching at how they were missed.  Well done JP.

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This thread is a place were I can share and continually update pictures of any of my current gold finds, kind of like a gold diary of sorts. Sometimes I’ll include narrative other times it will be jus

Continuing on with the detecting sessions, yesterday was initially a total failure except for my back up little bits patch on the way home. I spent most of the morning chasing big gold in nasty ground

Yesterday was a bit of fun but not very profitable.🤫 I zigged and I zagged but just could not get onto anything of any size so these little tackers were all I could manage for the rattle jar.😬

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impressive as usual…
(I couldn't see which coil you were using :rolleyes:)

 

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Can't go wrong with a day like that in a flogged patch!

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JP back in the mid 1980 My brother in-law, wife and yours truely had a trip to your area. A storm hit us very hard at the time, the tents were nearly blown away. We had permission to hunt on a private claim at the time. No luck for my bother in-law or myself, but Carol (my wife) still won't let us forget that she was the only one that scored gold on that very short trip. Gold is were you find it but 100 yards from a large roundabout in the town section of Clermont showed me you can find gold anywhere someone has not detected. I am not sure but either your gold shop or the Claim owner had a army Name like Sargent or Major.

The high light of the trip for me was that I came across a working Alluvial  Mine, the owner allowed me to go down to the working face. I think it was 90 foot deep and one of the owner was down there with a pick digging out some white pipe clay in a very cramped space. This was winched out in a 44 gallon drum at the entrance shaft that was about 4ft wide and 90 ft deep   

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13 hours ago, geof_junk said:

JP back in the mid 1980 My brother in-law, wife and yours truely had a trip to your area. A storm hit us very hard at the time, the tents were nearly blown away. We had permission to hunt on a private claim at the time. No luck for my bother in-law or myself, but Carol (my wife) still won't let us forget that she was the only one that scored gold on that very short trip. Gold is were you find it but 100 yards from a large roundabout in the town section of Clermont showed me you can find gold anywhere someone has not detected. I am not sure but either your gold shop or the Claim owner had a army Name like Sargent or Major.

The high light of the trip for me was that I came across a working Alluvial  Mine, the owner allowed me to go down to the working face. I think it was 90 foot deep and one of the owner was down there with a pick digging out some white pipe clay in a very cramped space. This was winched out in a 44 gallon drum at the entrance shaft that was about 4ft wide and 90 ft deep   

That would have been Sid Major, from memory he had a lease out near the Airport but am unsure about the round-about one nearer to town, although I have detected gold in there in the long distant past. I first came to Clermont in 1994 so that was well before my time, the first Minelab dealer in Clermont was a guy called Graham Pepper. Gosh there must have been some gold to be had back then!! Clermont was a beast of a place for VLF, so the vast majority of ground went largely undetected till 1995 then it went ballistic. 

JP

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1 hour ago, Jonathan Porter said:

You ever had a day when you just can’t do anything wrong? 

Haven't had one of those in a long time...Awesome, JP!

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On 12/8/2020 at 11:40 AM, Jonathan Porter said:

I prefer it if there has been a few thunder storms to wash away all the tyre tracks and footprints, the myriads of patterned phycological evidence that beta-blocks the feeling of success right out of your very soul before you even start the first swing of the coil. 🥴

JP,

Perhaps your lack of thunderstorms this year kept your ground dry for extra sensitivity to your Zed just as Lunk and Gerry experienced at a dry Rye Patch!

Well done and the follow up was pretty good too.

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On 12/15/2020 at 12:22 AM, mn90403 said:

JP,

Perhaps your lack of thunderstorms this year kept your ground dry for extra sensitivity to your Zed just as Lunk and Gerry experienced at a dry Rye Patch!

Well done and the follow up was pretty good too.

Thunderstorms and unstable weather have been an issue atmospherically for the past few months, but the ground has been bone dry which is good in the more conductive ground types around Clermont. I always try to hit the ground early while the atmosphere is at its most stable, the GPZ is very good for Sferic type noise so is pretty quiet until things really start to heat up. 

In conductive variable ground the signal increases with the moisture, so what was a faint murmur when dry and easily managed by the Semi-Auto G balance become more defined and positive when wet or damp, making it hard to listen for edge of detection signal responses.

JP

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