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Hi all, hope everyone is ready for dredging . I have a 2" Keene dredge, with the hard floats. Dose anyone how much air to put in the floats? Don't want to blow them up, but need them to float good. Any help would be good, I tried to look on line but could not find how much pressure to put in them.  Thanks  Dean

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If they are "hard" floats, I wouldn't think you would have to put any air in them?  I never did in many years of dredging.....

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They are the hard floats, they have air values on the small ends. with values covers like on a car tire.

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those are rubber floats, black as I recall. Hard floats are made of marlex plastic and don't need air. I trashed mine and got Marlex hard plastic  floats from a place in Oregon instead.Worry free.

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If they are the black semi-inflatable floats inflate until firm and no more. Overinflating could blow the valve out. Another way to gauge is that when inflated properly they fit the curve of the frame perfectly.

I think some of the hard gray floats have valves that are to allow you to deal with either elevation changes or cold water deforming the floats by adding or releasing a little air.

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I never put air in mine and they had plenty of buoyancy. 

More than a pound or two and you could pop them!

good luck👍

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Thanks all, These are the Marlex floats , not the black rubber ones. I just didn't know if they were to have air or not.  They float ok, just thinking, that sometimes get me in trouble. Thanks  Dean

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