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67GTA

Help With XP Deus Ground Balance

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Just bought the XP Deus and trying to learn the machine. I've watched all the videos I can find about the XP Deus and ground balancing. They are almost all in the UK, and the dirt here in the US is a little different. I've proven to myself in the test garden that the default GB of 90 will not hit my 9"-10" dime. The tracking and pumping method both come in at 78 and the ground reading is 77. At those numbers the Deus will hit my 9"-10" silver dime, but the coil becomes ridiculously sensitive and falses on the slightest bumps. It is impossible to hunt soybean stubble or tall grass. I can manually set it as high as 86-87 and the dime signal almost disappears, but it stops the falsing. Is there something I've missed regarding GB, or is this just a Deus thing? Any suggestions?

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My ground is about the same as far as your GB numbers go. I run my GB at 85 and it runs just great at that number. Doesn't get the depth of running it lower, but it's stable. I just set it and forget it, unless I go to a different part of the country.

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Probably what I should do also, but with all the adjustments I might go crazy.

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You are on the right track. If you usually get 77 or so just raise it manually 3 or 4 numbers until the coil knock is quieter. I think the Deus has a ground balance point around 77 that makes the coil unstable. I don't know what that is called??????  Hopefully Chase will respond to this topic with the actual reason why this happens. Seems like each number has several fractional increments too. In my bad dirt I have to ground balance a lot even though usually the ground phase is 83 to 85, ground noise gets really noisy if it is set just 1 full number too high or too low.

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Do what Jeff recommends to minimize coil bump sensitivity.  If you are within 5 points or so of the actual ground phase reading you will lose minimal depth.  I don't know why it happens, but you can work around it.

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yup exactly what I do. Do the pump method then add 3 points works like a charm. My machine seems to be really happy with 83 at almost all my sites. Curious what settings you are using and which coil? May still be able to keep your sensitivity settings of 86-87 and turn down the reactivity a bit. Or turn down the Tx gain and bump up sense more. 

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Thanks for the info. Not used to the Deus level of sensitivity. Been used to the pump and go method with other detectors.

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Deus has pumping GB feature.  Works good too.

Take a look at this video.  Where gent uses and talks about ground notch feature.  Use of this will help with noise from bumping coil in fields.  The manual really only talks about ground notch helping with hot rocks, it will help with coil bumping too,

Run down around level 85.

Cheers 

 

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When I do the pumping method it still comes in around 78 with the ground reading around 77. Manually setting it to 85-86 seems to be the best compromise. Never touched the ground notch. Wonder if ground notch at 85 will still give an audible target signal with a VDI of 85, or is that completely different from regular notch?

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5 hours ago, 67GTA said:

When I do the pumping method it still comes in around 78 with the ground reading around 77. Manually setting it to 85-86 seems to be the best compromise. Never touched the ground notch. Wonder if ground notch at 85 will still give an audible target signal with a VDI of 85, or is that completely different from regular notch?

It will give a signal. You can try it out and see.

 

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