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Incredible Gold Coins And Other Artifacts Found With GPX With X-coils And F75 - Updated Regularly

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A superb find. It looks typical of an early stater, produced in the Greece/Turkey region. The metal is a natural gold/silver alloy, hence the pale colour. Probably dates from 500 BC or earlier.
We don't find anything that old here in the UK, that's for sure. Our earliest Roman coins go back to 200 BC, and home-produced ones date to 70 BC.

Some background:
Greek_Coins

And a pretty close match: a winged dog above a tunny fish, dontcha know:
Stater

Google image search: "gold stater tunny fish" and a variety of them come up.

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The back looks like a coin in the British museum called an Electrum coin from turkey. The photo of it is posted below, It weigh's 16.012 gr. It dates to the 6th and 7th century BCE. As Pimento UK said its made of gold and silver. Very awesome coin, History at its best!!

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The alloy of gold and silver for casting these old coins is called Electrum ..
The technology of stamping consisted in the casting of coins and the subsequent stamping of coins with a stamp even when the metal was hot ...

In addition to these gold coins .... ,, ... they were also cast, silver coins were minted...

IMG_20200430_213204.jpg

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Pasted from the last link in PimentoUK's post:

The function of this mount is uncertain it maybe from decorated harness or furniture, or possibly from a sword belt set. An almost identical example of a complete millefiori mount was acquired by Oxfordshire Museum Service in 2006. It is dated to the 2nd or 3rd century AD and although possibly found in Oxfordshire may have emanated from the city of Cologne a specialist glass and enamel working centre in the Roman period. A similar disc with different millefiori decoration is also held by the British Museum (Accession Number: 1891,0327.9), discovered from Chepstow in Monmouthshire and dated to the 2nd-3rd century. A further published example is known from the excavation from Gestingthorpe, Essex (Butcher: 1985 Cat No:15, Fig 8 pp27-29): This example was discovered in a pit alongside the skull and bones of a horse leading to the suggestion that this is a form of bridle decoration. No stratigraphic relationships were recorded and a broad - date was ascribed to the feature. Further, Butcher cites other examples as parallels from Usk (National Museum of Wales), Newstead and other elaborate studs from Pannonia with dates for those examples ranging from the late 2nd - 3rd centuries. PAS has also recorded a number of these mounts including examples from: Nailsea, Somerset (GLO-549164) Claverdon, Warwickshire (WAW-D50D57) Thornham, Norfolk (NMS-40A082), Ludford, Lincolnshire (DENO-FE87A5) Anston, East Yorkshire (DENO-C6BD17), Glanton, Northumbria (NCL-A38DF3), and Chilten, Oxfordshire (BERK-D929C2). Several of these examples have similar projecting shanks or pierced holes which would have enabled them to have been affixed to something. This example is the only one noted to have a white metal solder on the reverse.

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Our friend has been at it again, unbelievable! The GPX with his big X-coil is producing the goods.

95948856_665624517561007_4861319348851048448_n.jpg.72f8e8c1eb3efaec7cf2776b2549ef73.jpg

The detail on these old coins is pretty amazing.

95777683_687188325440738_2226141301101821952_n.thumb.jpg.18324f888e0143c4959c8addbd1d18ed.jpg

95703649_268707510968822_2436819995410300928_n.thumb.jpg.5ee25635b743df88892b3d0877b081b3.jpg

95657661_260057735353805_6955697654676324352_n.thumb.jpg.da4d95888b97dfbc79342b95f5da1435.jpg

a tiny bit lighter than the last one.  I am very jealous.

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Now these ones are very different to the others, very nice coins too.  I wish they still made coins look like these, 3D objects on them 🙂

95415565_240122087243510_8735618757398888448_n.jpg.dd6ff32533130e650edb3b2d38b30eb9.jpg

96016426_556541955257646_1213065348991942656_n.thumb.jpg.688f8dd448faa8d28814b50d69e459fc.jpg

I guess these were less value than the gold coins in their currency? I am unsure how currency used to work.

It makes the coins I find in my locations seem pretty bad when they're lucky to be 100 years old.

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    • By phrunt
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    • By Chet
      Finally got out again with the 15" x 10” X-Coil. It ran really quiet and smooth continually in High Yield, Normal, at Sensitivity at 20. Found 10 small nuggets for a total weight of 4.55 grams. They were between 5 to 8 inches deep in a California pine tree area.
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    • By Mc30
      Picked up my 10 inch x coil during the week, good to get out to my usual spot, picked up these in 2 hours detecting, really impressed with this coil. 

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