Jump to content

Recommended Posts


That is a pretty cool Token, Calabash.   

I did a google for bread tokens....I never knew bread tokens were so widespread.  I guess they were loyalty rewards?

HH

Mike

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From the Great Depression? Can you still use it? :)

Wonder if Panera accepts them hehe

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice Token Calabash! Here's one I found metal detecting from the Leadville, Colorado area dated around late 1800's to 1900's.

1500071595_100_3527(1468x1660).thumb.jpg.ff942986b279098525e0461ada4b275c.jpg1347939449_100_3528(1596x1817).thumb.jpg.a9f80343662d1d0ccd596f5030e1da52.jpg

  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great tokens everybody.I     remember in a  old Whites magazine add that someone found a token from  the great Ghost town of  Bodie ,California.That is as good as it gets to me.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Those used for general trade or did they come out during the depression for rations?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, kac said:

Those used for general trade or did they come out during the depression for rations?

The token I found was used for general trade, according to Stuart Pritchard's Guide to Colorado Merchant Trade Tokens book there were three different versions for this token which circulated around 1895 to 1905.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Similar Content

    • By Glenn in CO
      What's Your Most Unusual Token Find?
      Recently Calabash had posted a unusual token find for one loaf which I thought was pretty cool token find. Going through some of my token finds from past years I believe this is my most unusual token find to date. The token is from the Delagua Mine which is located in southern Colorado and is good for one cap, 22mm in size and made of brass. The V.A.F. Co. stands for the Victor-American Fuel Company.
      Here is some history on the Delagua Mine:
      Delagua developed around the Delagua bituminous coal mine, opened in 1903 and operated by the Victor American Fuel Company. As of 1922, it was the largest mine in Colorado,and at its peak employed at least 900 men. In October 1917, the Delagua Mine was considered one of the "largest and finest 'mining camps' in the state". By 1916 the saloon and dance hall had been converted into the Delagua Social Club, complete with "three first class pool tables and one billiard table", a soda fountain, , bowling alleys, a stage that featured a motion picture show twice weekly and at least 250 members in 1917. At the Delagua Mine on November 8, 1910, an explosion (loud enough to be heard three miles away in Hastings) killed 76 miners. Safety inspectors later determined that the blast was an explosion of gas and dust, caused by the open flame of a head lamp.

       
    • By Cowkiller
      I got a equinox 800 last week and my first two hunts i got nothing good. Watched you tube til I found the end of coin shooting. I made adjustments and bam one 1943 mercury dime, some wheats a 1967 peso and a cool brass button that reads California Highway Patrol. The picture I took sucks sorry about that. Whats the best way to clean these guys up? youtube is all over the map....

    • By steveg
      ...a pretty good day by Oklahoma standards! 

      These came from a grassy area between an old hospital, and an old church; my hunting buddies managed some other goodies -- including two Mercs, a couple of IHPs, several wheats, and a Buffalo nickel.
      Steve

    • By relicmeister
      This weekend I went to a cool new location with multiple late 19th century cellar holes. Was using my Orx with 9” X35 at 17 KHz   
          A few interesting relics found but by far the best find was this 1864 2- cent piece which is in really nice condition with a great patina. Only my second 2- cent but the first was smoked by the fertilizer used in the park it was found in. Could barely identify it. 
          I’ll be going back to the spot multiple times as I haven’t even explored the area yet.  Also found an 1884 IHP
        Figured I’d post as the XP forum has been a little slow of late. 


    • By Bash
      After a bit of a drought of finding cool coins with the Equinox, I found another V nickel detecting in the neighbors parking strip in between thunderstorms.  It was pretty worn and pitted, and not of any numismatic value, so I cleaned it up a bit.


    • By Againstmywill
      Went to the same location where I had 42 quarters. I used the same settings, but this time I swung the Samurai sword 15" coil. I had a bit more time today (11:20-1:20), but the humidity was really oppressive. No mosquitoes this time because they don't even want to be out in the Florida heat!
      I believe 55 quarters is a first for me in 2 hours. If I were not the one going up and down all those times, I would not believe these coins all came from 2 hours of detecting. Most were within the first few inches, so they were a quick dig. With all the stuff dug, that is an average of about 1 item a minute. I think I know what I can save up for...knee replacemnts!
      I left a scad of dimes in the ground, so there are still plenty of targets for my friend. 😁
      The bracelet was a STRONG 9-10. It looked amazing coming out of the ground, but it was not silver. There was also an iPod Nano, but my son snagged it in hopes of cleaning it up.
      Now, time to focus on the jewelry!
       





×
×
  • Create New...